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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 2 0 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 2 0 Browse Search
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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 2: early recollections of California--(continued). 1849-1850. (search)
r. As long as the hide was green, the pole was very shaky; but gradually the sun dried the hide, tightened it, and the pole actually held for about a month. This cost us nearly a day of delay; but, when damages were repaired, we harnessed up again, and reached the crossing of the Cosumnes, where our survey was to begin. The expediente, or title-papers, of the ranch described it as containing nine or eleven leagues on the Cosumnes, south side, and between the San Joaquin River and Sierra Nevada Mountains. We began at the place where the road crosses the Cosumnes, and laid down a line four miles south, perpendicular to the general direction of the stream; then, surveying up the stream, we marked each mile so as to admit of a subdivision of one mile by four. The land was dry and very poor, with the exception of here and there some small pieces of bottom-land, the great bulk of the bottom-land occurring on the north side of the stream. We continued the survey up some twenty miles in
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cerro Gordo, battle of (search)
Cerro Gordo, battle of Cerro Gordo is a difficult mountain pass, at the foot of the eastern slope of the Cordilleras, on the great national road from Vera Cruz to the city of Mexico. Santa Ana, by extraordinary efforts after the battle of Buena Vista (q. v.), had gathered a force of about 12,000 men from among the sierras of Orizaba, concentrated them upon the heights of Cerro Gordo, and strongly fortified the position. When the capture of Vera Cruz (q. v.) was completed, General Scott prepared to march upon the Mexican capital, along the national road. He left General Worth as temporary governor of Vera Cruz, with a sufficient garrison for the Castle of San Juan de Ulloa, and moved forward (April 8, 1847) with about 8,000 men, the division of Gen. D. A. Twiggs in advance. Twiggs approached Cerro Gordo on the 13th, and found Santa Ana in his path. Scott arrived the next morning and prepared to attack the stronghold. On the 17th he issued a remarkable general order, directin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Irrigation, (search)
at cañon system and plateau of the Colorado, the meadow-lands of Nevada, the northwest Columbia Basin, and the National Park. 3. A region including about onefourth of the territory of California, and divided into two parts —the foothills of the Sierras and the broad, level valley lying between the Sierras and the Coast Range. In 1900 these divisions taken as a whole contained a population of 9,000,000 people, and over 50,000,000 acres of land under some form of cultivation. About 9,000,0the Sierras and the Coast Range. In 1900 these divisions taken as a whole contained a population of 9,000,000 people, and over 50,000,000 acres of land under some form of cultivation. About 9,000,000 acres of this land have been made available through irrigation, by means of artesian wells in a few cases, but for the most part by the construction of canals and ditches. The national government to some extent has also made experiments in irrigation in various parts of the arid West. Up to 1900 these had been carried on in fifty-three different places. Developments in irrigation, however, have proceeded almost wholly in the building of Sweetwater Dam, Southern California, used in irrig
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Miller, Cincinnatus Heine 1841- (search)
s. Returning to the United States he spent several years in newspaper work in Washington. Since 1887 he has resided in Oakland, Cal. In 1897-98 he was correspondent for the New York Journal in the Klondike. His publications include Songs of the Sierras; Songs of the Sunland; The ship of the Desert; Life among the Modocs; The one fair woman; Shadows of Shasta; Songs of far-away lands; 1849, or the gold-seekers of the Sierras; The life of Christ, etc. He has also written plays, including The sseveral years in newspaper work in Washington. Since 1887 he has resided in Oakland, Cal. In 1897-98 he was correspondent for the New York Journal in the Klondike. His publications include Songs of the Sierras; Songs of the Sunland; The ship of the Desert; Life among the Modocs; The one fair woman; Shadows of Shasta; Songs of far-away lands; 1849, or the gold-seekers of the Sierras; The life of Christ, etc. He has also written plays, including The silent man; 1849; The Danites; Tally-Ho, etc.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, California Volunteers. (search)
rcata, August 21, 1862. Ordered to San Francisco August 28, thence to Stockton and to Camp Union, Sacramento, November 17, and duty there till June, 1863. Ordered to Camp Douglass, Utah, and join Regiment. Regiment at Benicia Barracks till July, 1862. March via Fort Churchill and Ruby Valley to Utah to protect Overland mail route July to November. Scouts from Fort Churchill, Nev., to Honey Lake Valley, Cali., November 3-29, 1862. Expedition from Fort Ruby, Nev., to Sierra Nevada Mountains November 22-27, 1862 (Co. F ). Skirmish on Bear River, Utah, January 26, 1863 (Co. K ). Engagement on Bear River January 29 (Co. K ). Expedition from Camp Douglass to Soda Springs, on Bear River, Idaho, May 5-30, 1863 (Co. H ). Duty at Camp Douglass, Camp Connor and in the District of Utah till July, 1866. Mustered out July 27, 1866. 4th California Regiment Infantry. Organized at Sacramento, Placerville and Auburn September to October, 1861. Attached to D
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 5: sources of the Tribune's influence — Greeley's personality (search)
le banquet, and gave his experience as an editor to a Parliamentary Commission. When he visited Paris in 1855 he was arrested at the instance of a French exhibitor at the Crystal Palace exhibition in New York, who tried to hold him responsible for a statue that was broken there because he was a director in the enterprise, and he was imprisoned for two days in the Clichy prison. His trip across the plains, in 1859, was made a notable event, and the driver of the stage in which he crossed the Sierras was a sort of hero for the rest of his life. Greeley edited the whole Tribune up to the day of his nomination for President. None of its columns escaped his supervision. He was not an easy man to please, as he considered all mistakes likely to be placed on his own shoulders. The style of his own editorial articles was clear, forceful, and concise, without rhetorical adornment, and he expected his assistants to follow his model. Writing to one of these who had gotten out a number o
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
; Two men of Sandy bar (1876); Thankful Blossom (1876); The story of a mine (1877); Drift from two shores (1878); The Twins of table Mountain, and other stories (1879); Flip, and found at Blazing star (1882); In the Carquinez woods (1883); On the frontier (1884); By Shore and Sedge (1885) ; Maruja, a novel (1885); Snow-Bound at eagle's (1886); A Millionnaire of rough and ready (1887) ; The Queen of the Pirate Isle, for children (1887) ; The Argonauts of North liberty (1888); A Phyllis of the Sierras (1888) ; Cressy (1889) ; the Heritage of Dedlow Marsh (1889); A Waif of the Plains (1890); and a second series of Condensed novels (1902). He died at Red House, Camberley, in Surrey, Eng., May 6, 1902. Hawthorne, Nathaniel Born in Salem, Mass., July 4, 1804, of Puritan stock. He was of an imaginative and sensitive temperament, and after graduating from Bowdoin College in 1825, spent twelve years in Salem in retirement, reading and writing continually. His first novel, Fanshawe, ap
ardly adequate, by itself, for a very long voyage over human life. Joaquin (Cincinnatus Heine) Miller, who was born in 1841 and died in 1913, had even less of a formula for the West than Jack London. He was a word-painter of its landscapes, a rider over its surfaces. Cradled in a covered wagon pointing West, mingling with wild frontier life from Alaska to Nicaragua, miner, Indian fighter, hermit, poseur in London and Washington, then hermit again in California, the author of Songs of the Sierras at least knew his material. Byron, whom he adored and imitated, could have invented nothing more romantic than Joaquin's life; but though Joaquin inherited Scotch intensity, he had nothing of the close mental grip of the true Scot and nothing of his humor. Vast stretches of his poetry are empty; some of it is grandiose, elemental, and yet somehow artificial, as even the Grand Canyon itself looks at certain times. John Muir, another immigrant Scot who reached California in 1868, had f
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
boots. In 1870-71 the Oregon Byron, then in London, achieved a popularity as sudden as that of his master. Songs of the Sierras, first published many thousand miles from the Sierras themselves, was widely applauded, and Tennyson, Browning, Swinbuthe Sierras themselves, was widely applauded, and Tennyson, Browning, Swinburne, and Rossetti received this typical American author as a brother bard. Then America, too, discovered him, and he was soon known from London to San Francisco. Although his debt to Byron, Coleridge, and other romanticists is obvious to any readen expense, in London, Pacific poems, which had an astonishing reception before being promptly republished as Songs of the Sierras. Of the many volumes that followed, none fulfilled the promise that readers not unnaturally found in the Songs. He w this 1843-44 expedition did not halt in Oregon. It headed southward into Mexican territory along the eastern edge of the Sierras, hunting for a mythical Buenaventura River that would have made a fine military base had it existed. Not discovering
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
on the bills of credit now passing in New England, 425 Some corrections of My life on the Plains, 160 Some desert Watering places, 150 Some observations on the Bill . . . for granting to his Majesty an Excise upon Wines, 427 Some remedies proposed for Restoring the sunk credit of the Province of Pennsylvania, 427 Song of songs, the, 294 Song of the shirt, the, 603 Songs and sonnets, 38 Songs from Vagabondia, 51 Songs of summer, 45 Songs of the Outlands, 161 Songs of the Sierras, 54, 55 Songster's Museum, the, 493 Sonnenthal, 590 Sonnets (Shakespeare), 482 Sonnichsen, Albert, 166 Son of royal Langbrith, the, 84 Sontag, Karl, 587 Sophocles, 460 Sophocles, Evangelinus Apostolides, 461 Sorma, Agnes, 590 Sothern, E. H., 279 Soul of the Indian, the, 147 South, the, 352 South Atlantic quarterly, 305 South Carolina (University), 184, 342, 433 Southern cross, the, 495 Southern Literary Messenger, 301, 305, 553 n. Southern platform
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