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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
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have tried to preserve every possible analogy to the Hebrews; and this memorable migration out of Egypt to the promised land has enabled them to indulge it. Utah reproduced to their imaginations a new and enlarged type of Canaan. As they emerged from the defiles of the Rocky Mountains they beheld a vast basin, in which lay a Dead Sea, with a shore-line of 290 miles, in a frame of treeless mountains, its sullen waves lapping a snow-white beach. From a second sea of Galilee — the beautiful Utah Lake-another Jordan poured down, along whose green banks the Mormon, in his mind's eye, saw set the cities of the Lord. Brigham Young looked beyond these types, and perceived himself posted in a stronghold where he thought he could bid defiance to the armies of the world. Lofty and inaccessible mountains girdled it, to whose few and narrow gateways he would hold the key. His new city would be a Tadmor of the desert, a city of refuge, a holy place, and a prison whose door he would keep — a
s Valuation of his citizenship. a fleet-footed Indian. the Japanese. a quartermaster-general appointed. Reunion with his family. 1860. the crisis of American destiny. assignment to command in California. Camp Floyd, the headquarters of the Army of Utah, was situated at the north end of Cedar Valley, midway between Salt Lake City and Provo, about thirty-six miles distant from each. The valley was about eight miles wide and twenty-five miles long, and situated three miles west of Utah Lake, with a low range of mountains intervening. The population of the Territory was located chiefly at the western base of the Wahsatch range, and along the eastern rim of the Great Salt Lake Basin. The position selected for the camp was a commanding one, as the valley debouched in the direction of Salt Lake City by two routes, toward Provo by two, and also into Tintic Valley in the direction of Fillmore City. The grass of Cedar Valley, and of Tintic and Rush Valleys, which communicated wit
tal, Salt Lake City. Franciscan friars Silvestre Velez de Escalante and Francisco Atanasio Dominguez, looking for a route from Santa Fe to Monterey, Cal., reach Utah and Sevier lakes......September, 1776 Great Salt Lake discovered by James Bridger......1825 One hundred and twenty men, under William H. Ashley, come to UtUtah Lake from St. Louis through South Pass, and build Fort Ashley......1825 Jedediah S. Smith and fifteen trappers march from Great Salt Lake to Utah Lake, and thence to San Gabriel Mission, Cal., 1826; return to Utah......1827 J. Bartleson and twenty-seven emigrants for California proceed from Soda Springs to Corrine and thenUtah Lake, and thence to San Gabriel Mission, Cal., 1826; return to Utah......1827 J. Bartleson and twenty-seven emigrants for California proceed from Soda Springs to Corrine and thence into Nevada......August, 1841 Marcus Whitman and A. L. Lovejoy, on their way from Oregon to the United States, pass through Utah......1842 Col. John C. Fremont, with Kit Carson and three others, explores Great Salt Lake in a rubber boat......Sept. 8, 1843 Brigham Young and 142 Mormons, in search of a location for their
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
w well known. The transit to the new home across the wide and unsettled plains and mountains was a huge undertaking and entailed much hardship. T. L. Kane, a non-Mormon, accompanied the famous hand cart expedition and tells about it in The Mormons (1850). The literature connected with the Mormons is voluminous. One of the latest, most comprehensive, and most exact general books is W. J. Linn's Story of the Mormons (1902). Spanish Trail to Utah and breaking through the Wasatch east of Utah Lake. His Report of the exploring expedition to the Rocky Mountains in the year 1842 and to Oregon and Northern California in the years 1843–;44 (1845) was a revelation to most of the world. Ten thousand copies were printed by the government, and it was reprinted by professional publishers, minus the scientific matter, in their regular lists. The very day Fremont handed in this report, I March, 1845, the United States flung the gauntlet in the face of Mexico by admitting Texas and assuming