Your search returned 48 results in 17 document sections:

1 2
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 4: grand tactics, and battles. (search)
We wish only to cite them here for reference, directing our readers to the various historical or didactic works which might make mention of them. We have already pointed out the nature of the results, often very important, which may be promised from them. The taking of Sizipoli in 1828; the unsuccessful attack of General Petrasch upon Kehl in 1796; the singulor surprises of Cremona in 1702, of Gibralter in 1704, and of Bergen-op-Zoom in 1814, as well as the escalades of Port Mahon and Badajos, may give an idea of the different kinds of coups de main. Some are the effect of surprise, others are made by main force; address, ruse, terror, audacity, are elements of success for these kinds of enterprises. In the present mode of making war, the carrying of a post, however strong it may be from its situation, would no longer have the importance formerly attached to it, unless it offered a strategic advantage susceptible of influencing the results of a great operation. The taking
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 3: Fortifications.Their importance in the defence of States proved by numerous historical examples (search)
pen trench. Ciudad Rodrigo in 1810 sustained a siege of two months. Almeida in 1810 sustained a siege of more than a month. Tortosa in 1810 sustained a siege of six months. Tarragona in 1811 sustained a siege of nearly two months. Badajos in 1811 sustained a siege of more than forty days open trench. Lerida in 1811 sustained a siege of two weeks open trench. Saguntum in 1811 sustained a siege of a month. Valencia in 1811-12 sustained a siege of two months. Ciudad Rodrigo in 1812 sustained a blockade of several months, and a close siege of two weeks. Badajos in 1812 sustained twenty-one days of open trenches. Burgos in 1812 sustained thirty-three days of open trenches. St. Sebastian in 1813 sustained a siege and blockade of nearly three months, with fifty-nine days of open trenches. Pampeluna in 1813 sustained a siege of more than four months. Monzon in 1813-14 also sustained a siege of more than four months, This list might be increased w
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 11: army organization.—Artillery.—Its history and organization, with a brief Notice of the different kinds of Ordnance, the Manufacture of Projectiles, &c. (search)
y. Hutton--(Hutton's Tracts.) Des bois propres au service Des Arsenaux. Herbir de Halles. Instruction sur le service de l'artillerie. Hulot. Manoeuvres de force. Bigot. Balistique. Obenheim. Treatise on artillery. German. Scharnhorst. (Translated into French, 1840.) Essai sur l'art de pointer. Poumet. Reflexions sur la fabrication des bouches à feu Lamartilliere. Memoire sur la planchette du canonnier. Obenheim. Aide-Meimoire. Gassendi. Observations on the use of artillery at the sieges of Badajos, St, Sebastian, &c. Treatise on artillery. Lallemand. Elemens de pyrotechnic. Ruggieri Nouvelle force maritime. Paixhans, Dictionnaire d'artillerie. Cotty. Recherches balistiques. Coste. Poudres fulminantes. Vergnaud. Maniel de la metallurgie du fer. Culman. Pyrotechnie militaire, (traduit de l'allomand, par R. do Peretsdorff:) Journal des sciences Miilitaires. Pyrotechny. Catbush. Traite élementaire d'artillerie. Decker. Fusees de guerre. Montgory. Documens sur la matiere à canons. Herve.
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 12: army organization—Engineers.—Their history, duties, and organization,—with a brief discussion, showing their importance as a part of a modern army organization. (search)
lonel J. T. Jones writes in nearly the same terms of the early sieges in the Peninsula, and with respect to the siege of Badajos, adds in express terms, that a body of sappers and miners, and the necessary fascines and gabions, would have rendered t 523 1019 Tortosa, 43 429 32 381 472 413 Tarragona, 50 681 46 701 731 747 Olivensa, 10 106 -- -- 116 186 1st Badajos, 25 707 41 699 732 740 Tarifa, 12 235 17 148 247 165 Peniscola, 13 138 9 183 151 192 2d Ciudad Rodrigo, 3 12 8 160 15 168 2d Badajos, 9 256 -- -- 265 268 Burgos, 4 124 3 126 128 129 Castio Udiales, 5 68 8 197 73 205 St. Sebastian, 13 248 7 166 261 173 From this table it appears that the ratio of the two arms at these sieges, making the compa In the pursuit of Massena, in 1810, it was important to the English to cross the Guadiana, and attack the French before Badajos could be put in a state of defence. Beresford was directed by Wellington to pass this river at Jerumina, where the Port
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 13: permanent fortifications.—Historical Notice of the progress of this Art.—Description of the several parts of a Fortress, and the various Methods of fortifying a position (search)
xon, wrote on fortification in 1671. He was a man of great experience, having served at the sieges of Candia, Phillipsburg, Bonn, Riga, Bremen, Dansburg, Bommeln, &c. He fell at the siege of Vienna in 1683. His writings are said to contain the groundwork of Montalembert's system. In Italy, after the time of Tartaglia, Marchi, Campi, &c., we find no great improvement in this art. Several Italians, however, distinguished themselves as engineers under the Spaniards. The fortifications of Badajos are a good example of the state of the art in Italy and Spain at that epoch. The citadel of Antwerp, built by two Italian engineers, Pacciotti and Cerbelloni, in 1568, has become celebrated for the siege it sustained in 1832. The age of Louis XIV. effected a great revolution in the art of fortification, and carried it to such a degree of perfection, that it has since received but slight improvement. The years 1633 and 1634 are interesting dates in the history of this art, as having gi
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
ike the 2d, 20th, and 24th Massachusetts, and the 1st Massachusetts Cavalry. Even the 44th and the 45th, nine-monthers, behaved with credit; though there was this drawback in them, that the privates were too familiar with the officers, having known them before. However, perfection does not exist anywhere, and we should be thankful for the manifold virtues our soldiers do pre-eminently possess. I see much to make me more contented in reading Napier, before referred to. After the taking of Badajos, the English allowed their own wounded to lie two days in the breach, without an attempt to carry them off.. This is the nation that now gives us very good lectures on humanity. As to old Wellington, I suspect he was about as savage an old brute as would be easy to find. August 8, 1864 What do you think of filling up with Germans? you ask. Now, what do you think of a man who has the toothache — a werry, werry big molar!--and who has not the courage to march up and have it out, but tri
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
15, 128. Annoy, use of word, 247. Appleton, Nathan, 72, 127, 169. Appomattox campaign, 803; High Bridge, 352. Armistice, 154, 170, 201. Armstrong house, 114. Army, on the march, 29, 55; reinforcing, 31, 177; intercourse with enemy, 106, 153, 181; formation of, 263. Assaults, effect of too many, 148n. Atlanta, capture of, 228. Atlanta, iron-clad, 161, 163. Avery, Martin P., 171. Ayres, Romeyn Beck, 234, 236, 242, 331. Babcock, Orville Elias, 161, 314. Bache, —, 204. Badajos, English at, 207. Badeau, Adam, 314. Baldwin, Briscoe G., 125. Barlow, Francis Channing, 109, 117, 135,157, 215, 216; described, 107, 158, 189; at Cold Harbor, 144; at Petersburg, 186. Barnard, Daniel P., 343. Barnard, George, 91n. Barnard, John Gross, 248, 290. Barnes, Joseph K., 248. Barney, Hiram, 249. Barrows, William Eliot, 350. Barstow, Simon Forrester, 7, 48, 64, 232, 289. Bartlett, Joseph Jackson, 72. Battle, a great, 101. Beauregard, Pierre Gustave Toutant, 173
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 62.-Hoisting the Black flag — official correspondence and reports. (search)
record in the case is plainly made up, and I leave it. You justify and approve it, and appeal to history for precedents. As I have said, history furnishes no parallel. True, there are instances where, after a long and protracted resistance, resulting in heavy loss to the assailing party, the garrison has been put to the sword, but I know of no such instance that did not bring dishonor upon the commander that ordered or suffered it. There is no Englishman that would not gladly forget Badajos, nor a Frenchman that exults when Jaffa or the caves of Dahra and Shelas are spoken of. The massacre of Glencoe which the world has read of with horror for nearly two hundred years, pales into significance before the truthful recital of Fort Pillow. The desperate defence of the Alamo was the excuse for the slaughter of its brave survivors after its surrender, yet that act was received with just execration, and we are told by the historian that it led more than anything else to the indepe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
follow. But there comes no response befitting the stern grandeur of the scene — no trampling charge — no rolling drums of Austerlitz — no fierce shouts of warlike joy as burst from the men of the Light division when they mounted the breach of Badajos, or from Frazer's Royals as they crowned the crimson slopes of St. Sebastian. No, none of this is here. But a straggling line of the men of the Second brigade, First division, uttering a mechanical cheer, slowly mounts the crest, passes unmointo the ravine between Cemetery Hill and the drunken battalions of Ferrero, a stern array of silent men, clad in faded gray, resolved with grim resolve to avert from the mother-town a fate as dreadful as that which marked the three days sack of Badajos. Lee, informed of the disaster at 6.10 A. M., The hour is taken from the note-book of the staff-officer who delivered the message from Beauregard to Lee, and who noted the exact time at the moment. This note-book was kindly placed at my d<
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alvarado, Pedro de, 1485- (search)
Alvarado, Pedro de, 1485- A, Spanish conqueror in America; born in Badajos, Spain, about 1485. Sailing from Spain to Cuba, in 1518, he accompanied Grijalva on his exploring expedition along the Gulf coasts. Alvarado made explorations and discoveries on the coast of California, and was killed in a skirmish with the natives in New Galicia, June 4, 1541.
1 2