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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment 4 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Seacoast defences of South Carolina and Georgia. (search)
ts northern extremity extends to within a few miles of the Charleston and Savannah Railroad. The main road from Port Royal to Pocotaligo crosses the channel at this point. The evacuation of Hilton Head, on the southwestern extremity of Beaufort island, followed the capture of Port Royal. This exposed Savannah, only about twenty-five miles distant, to an attack from that direction. At the same time, the Federals having command of Helena bay, Charleston was liable to be assailed from north Edisto or Stono inlet, and the railroad could have been reached without opposition by the road from Port Royal to Pocotaligo. Such was the state of affairs when General Lee reached Charleston, about the first of December, 1861, to assume the command of the departments of North Carolina, Georgia and Florida. His vigorous mind at once comprehended the situation, and with his accustomed energy he met the difficulties that presented themselves. Directing fortifications to be constructed on the Sto
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Torpedo service in Charleston harbor. (search)
Torpedo service in Charleston harbor. General G. T. Beauregard. On my return to Charleston, in September, 1862, to assume command of the Department of South Carolina and Georgia, I found the defenses of those two States in a bad and incomplete condition, including defective location and arrangement of works, even at Charleston and Savannah. Several points — such as the mouths of the Stono and Edisto rivers, and the headwaters of Broad river at Port Royal — I found unprotected; though, soon after the fall of Fort Sumter, in 1861, as I was about to be detached, I had designated them to be properly fortified. A recommendation had even been made by my immediate predecessor that the outer defenses of Charleston harbor should be given up, as untenable against the iron-clads and monitors then known to be under construction at the North, and that the water line of the immediate city of Charleston should be made the sole line of defense. This course, however, not having been authorize
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Chapter 7: up the Edisto. (search)
n. And there were, certainly, in the early adventures of the colored troops in the Department of the South, some of the same elements of picturesqueness that belonged to Marion's band, on the same soil, with the added feature that the blacks were fighting for their personal liberties, of which Marion had helped to deprive them. It is stated by Major-General Gillmore, in his Siege of Charleston, as one of the three points in his preliminary strategy, that an expedition was sent up the Edisto River to destroy a bridge on the Charleston and Savannah Railway. As one of the early raids of the colored troops, this expedition may deserve narration, though it was, in a strategic point of view, a disappointment. It has already been told, briefly and on the whole with truth, by Greeley and others, but I will venture on a more complete account. The project dated back earlier than General Gillmore's siege, and had originally no connection with that movement. It had been formed by Capt
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Chapter 10: life at camp Shaw. (search)
Chapter 10: life at camp Shaw. The Edisto expedition cost me the health and strength of several years. I could say, long after, in the words of one of the men, I'se been a sickly person, eber since de expeditious. Justice to a strong constitution and good habits compels me, however, to say that, up to the time of my injury, I was almost the only officer in the regiment who had not once been off duty from illness. But at last I had to yield, and went North for a month. We heard much said, during the war, of wounded officers who stayed unreasonably long at home. I think there were more instances of those who went back too soon. Such at least was my case. On returning to the regiment I found a great accumulation of unfinished business; every member of the field and staff was prostrated by illness or absent on detailed service; two companies had been sent to Hilton Head on fatigue duty, and kept there unexpectedly long: and there was a visible demoralization among the rest,
where your labors and struggles culminated at Savannah, and the old Starry Banner waved once more over the wall of one of our proudest cities of the seaboard. Scarce a breathing spell had passed when your colors faded from the coast, and your columns plunged into the swamps of the Carolinas. The suffering you endured, the labors you performed, and the successes you achieved in those morasses, deemed impassable, form a creditable episode in the history of the war. Pocataligo, Salkahatchie, Edisto, Branchville, Orangeburgh, Columbia, Bentonville, Charleston, and Raleigh are names that will ever be suggestive of the resistless sweep of your columns through the territory that cradled and nurtured, and from whence was sent forth on its mission of crime, misery, and blood, the disturbing and disorganizing spirits of secession and rebellion. The work for which you pledged your brave hearts and brawny arms to the Government of your fathers you have nobly performed. You are seen in the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of torpedo service in Charleston Harbor by W. T. Glassel, Commander Confederate States Navy. (search)
ng the first ship ever blown up by a torpedo boat. I do not think this failure was from any fault or want of proper precaution of mine. The man who backed his oar and stopped the boat at the-critical moment declared afterwards that he had been terrified so that he knew not what he was doing. He seemed to be ashamed of his conduct, and wished to go with me into any danger. His name was James Murphy, and he afterwards deserted to the enemy by swimming off to a vessel at anchor in the Edisto river. I think the enemy must have received some hint from spies, creating a suspicion of torpedoes, before I made this attempt. I got back to Charleston after daylight next morning, with only the loss of one torpedo, and convinced that steam was the only reliable motive power. Commodore Tucker having been ordered to command the naval forces at Charleston, torpedoes were fitted to the bows of ironclad rams for use should the monitors enter the harbor. My esteemed friend, Mr. Theodo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Torpedo service in the Harbor and water defences of Charleston. (search)
Southern Historical Society Papers, so ably conducted by you. I remain, dear sir, yours very truly, G. T. Beauregard. Narrative by General Beauregard. On my return to Charleston in September, 1862, to assume command of the Department of South Carolina and Georgia, I found the defences of those two States in a bad and incomplete condition, including defective location and arrangement of works, even at Charleston and Savannah. Several points-such as the mouths of the Stono and Edisto rivers, and the headwaters of Broad river at Port Royal — I found unprotected; though soon after the fall of Fort Sumter, in 1861, as I was about to be detached, I had designated them to be properly fortified. A recommendation had even been made by my immediate predecessor that the outer defences of Charleston Harbor should be given up as untenable against the ironclads and monitors then known to be under construction at the North, and that the water-line of the immediate city of Charleston sh
an the rebel batteries at Cockpit and Shipping Points, on the Potomac, this morning, and reached the open sea without having been touched by shot or shell. A Reconnoitering party under command of Lieutenant W. T. Truxton, U. S. N., left St. Helena Sound, S. C., day before yesterday, and visited Bailey's Island, but found it entirely deserted, though well stocked with cattle, sheep, and horses. They visited many fine plantations, and yesterday marched to Bailey's Landing on the North-Edisto River, but met with no adventures. They returned to the Sound this afternoon. The advance of General Burnside's Expedition to the coast of North-Carolina, sailed from Fortress Monroe, Va. The Twenty-fourth regiment of Kentucky Volunteers, under the command of Colonel Grigsby, passed through Louisville, on the way to the seat of war.--Louisville Journal, January 13. Brigadier-General Sigel issued an address to the officers of his command in camp near Rolla, Mo., instructing them
to Ossabaw, and the Passaic to Warsaw, and at that time it was understood the Fingal, which had now been remodelled and rebuilt, and was christened the Atlanta, would make an attempt to go to sea notwithstanding the iron-clads. But, in fact, she was not ready, and only wanted completion to make the attempt. The iron-clad Weehawken has been lying in this harbor since the fight at Charleston, and on Saturday was ordered to Warsaw. Sunday morning the iron-clad Nahant left her anchorage in Edisto for the same destination. This morning, after so long waiting, the attempt was made with all rebel assurance, and resulted in a grand failure. The news was received here at ten o'clock this forenoon, and at four o'clock P. M., the steamer, with the officers and the wounded men, came into the harbor, and alongside the store-ship Vermont. The officers, numbering thirteen, and the men, numbering one hundred and thirty-seven, had been amply provided for on the Vermont. The wounded consiste
Doc. 28.-expedition up the South-Edisto, S. C. Official report of Colonel Higginson. on board steamer John Adams, July 11, 1863. Briyadier-General Saxton: General: I have the honor to submit a report of an expedition <*> the South-Edisto River, undertaken with your consent and that of General Gillmore, commanding department. I left Beaufort on the afternoon of the ninth, with the armed steamer John Adams, the transport Enoch Dean, and the small tug Governor Milton. I had with me two hundred and fifty officers and men of my regiment, and a section of the First Connecticut battery, under command of Lieutenant Clinton. By four o'clock the next morning we anchored before Wiltown, twenty-one miles up the river, and engaged a three-gun field-battery there stationed. After three shots they ceased firing, and, landing with Lieutenant West and thirty men, I took possession of the bluff, where the clothing, equipments, and breakfast-fires left behind betrayed a very hasty d
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