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Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 2 0 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 2 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 159 (search)
mained within 150 yards of the enemy's line until the 27th day of August. On that day my regiment moved in common with the corps to the right, taking part in the general movement upon Jonesborough. We continued to move, as ordered, cautiously to the right till the 31st of August, when we attained close proximity to the enemy. On that day my regiment supported the Ninety-second Ohio, and skirmishing forward in advance of the general line, the two regiments moved across the headwaters of Flint River and took possession of the Atlanta and Jonesborough road before noon, near Seaborn Smith's house. Subsequently the rest of the division came up. We executed this movement with little opposition. In the afternoon Captain Grosvenor, assistant inspector-general of the brigade, asked me for a detail of 100 men and 3 officers to make a scout toward the Atlanta and Macon Railroad. This detail was furnished, Captains Noles and Inskeep accompanying it, and Adjt. Augustus Ward as a mere volunte
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 160 (search)
at any moment. The enemy having intimation of the movement open fire upon us with shell and case-shot, throwing them with great accuracy, but the men, being well protected, were unhurt. Marched at 3 a. m. August 27; camped as guard to the train. 28th, rejoined division; cross West Point railroad, and camp in rear of Second Brigade. 30th, marched at 7 a. m. and took up position about three miles from Flint Creek; threw up works. 31st, advanced a mile; threw up works; at 1 p. m. cross Flint River and threw, up works in woods in view of roads on which enemy's columns were passing; at 6 p. m. the regiment, with the Eighty-second Indiana, move out on the railroad to Morrow's Station, to re-enforce Eighty-ninth Ohio; build works during the night on the railroad and prepare to hold them against any force; the energy displayed by both officers and men in constructing works, and general soldierly bearing of the entire command, was praiseworthy in the highest degree. At 10 a m. on the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 163 (search)
oved toward the Macon railroad. On the evening of the 30th ordered on picket with my regiment; advanced the lines as ordered by you. On the morning of the 31st of August, with my regiment, I was ordered to move forward and build bridges over Flint River and the canal near the river (creek), secure a lodgment on the south bank of Flint, and command the approaches to the bridges. In this move I was ably supported by Colonel Ward, of the Seventeenth Ohio. We passed the canal and the Flint, meeFlint, and command the approaches to the bridges. In this move I was ably supported by Colonel Ward, of the Seventeenth Ohio. We passed the canal and the Flint, meeting with no opposition from the enemy; moved forward and secured a fine position commanding the Atlanta and Jonesborough road. Striking this road at two points, we discovered a column of the enemy east of the road moving south on a by-road between the Jonesborough road and the railroad. Here we secured 12 prisoners. We here awaited the brigade, and with them went into camp at this point. Moving with the brigade, September 1, south on the Jonesborough pike, we went into the second line, the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Patton Anderson of operations of his division from 30th of July to 31st of August, 1864, including the battle of Jonesboro, Georgia. (search)
f shoes by many, and the lack of recent exercise by all, contributed to induce a degree of straggling which I do not remember to have seen exceeded in any former march of the kind. In this plight the division, well closed up on Cheatham's rear, reached the vicinity of Jonesboroa at about 11 o'clock A. M. on the 31st August, and was halted on the railroad, north of and about half a mile distant from the village. The enemy, in apparently strong force, was plainly visible on both sides of Flint river (an inconsiderable stream at this point), in a westerly direction from where we halted, and distant from a thousand to fifteen hundred yards. The column was closed up, faced to the right, skirmishers were thrown forward, and hasty preparations made for commencing, at the proper time, the battle of Jonesboroa, Georgia. The troops were advanced to a position parallel with and about two hundred yards west of the railroad, and immediately began strengthening the line with logs, rails, and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.43 (search)
‘. After consultation with the corps commanders,. determined upon the following operations as the last hope of holding on to Atlanta. A Federal corps crossed Flint River, at about 6 P. M., near Jonesboro‘, and made an attack upon Lewis's brigade, which was gallantly repulsed. This action became the signal for battle. General Hre to form line of battle on Lee's right, near East Point, and the whole force move forward the following morning, attack the enemy in flank, and drive him down Flint River and the West Point railroad. In the meantime the cavalry was to hold in check the corps of the enemy, stationed at the railroad bridge across the Chattahoocheestructions delivered. I impressed upon General Hardee that the fate of Atlanta rested upon his ability, with the aid of two corps, to drive the Federals across Flint River, at Jonesboro‘. I also instructed him in the event of failure — which would necessitate the evacuation of the city — to send Lee's corps, at dark, back to or
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 14: Sherman's campaign in Georgia. (search)
ecause he was nearest Atlanta, and reached the road at Rough and Ready Station, ten miles from that city. Thomas struck it at Couch's, and Howard, crossing the Flint River half a mile from Jonesboroa, approached it at that point. He encountered strong and entirely unexpected opposition, while Schofield felt none. The reason was ces of great guns, caused the chief to order both Thomas and Schofield to the assistance of Howard. At the same time Kilpatrick was sent down the west bank of the Flint to strike the railway below Jonesboroa, and Garrard was left at Couch's to scout the country in the direction of Atlanta. Davis's corps, of Thomas's army, very so appearance of the place when the writer sketched it, late in May, 1866. was found at Lovejoy's, not far distant, strongly intrenched, with the Walnut Creek and Flint River on his flanks. While Sherman was preparing with deliberation to dislodge him, rumors reached that leader that Hood was, indeed, evacuating Atlanta. The truth
rs, I determined upon the following operations, as the last hope of holding on to Atlanta. As General Armstrong had already foreseen, a Federal corps crossed Flint river at about 6 p. m., near Jonesboroa, and made an attack upon Lewis's brigade, which was gallantly repulsed. This action became the signal for battle. General Hare to form line of battle on Lee's right, near East Point, and the whole force move forward the following morning, attack the enemy in flank, and drive him down Flint river and the West Point Railroad. In the meantime, the cavalry was to hold in check the corps of the enemy, stationed at the railroad bridge across the Chattahoochenstructions delivered, I impressed upon General Hardee that the fate of Atlanta rested upon his ability, with the aid of two corps, to drive the Federals across Flint river, at Jonesboroa. I also instructed him, in the event of failure — which would necessitate the evacuation of the city — to send Lee's Corps, at dark, back to or
the 30th it became known that the enemy was moving on Jonesboroa with two corps. I determined, upon consulting with the corps commanders, to move two corps to Jonesboroa during the night, and to attack and drive the enemy at that place across Flint river. This I hoped would draw the attention of the enemy in that direction and that he would abandon his works on the left, so that I could attack him in flank. I remained in person with Stewart's Corps and the militia in Atlanta. Hardee's and Lr, and made a lodgement on the east bank. The preliminaries for the attack were arranged. My corps was formed almost parallel to the railroad, immediately to the right of Jonesboroa, connecting with Hardee's right, his line extending towards Flint river, and making almost a right angle with the railroad. It was found that Hardee's Corps did not cover as much ground as was expected, and I was instructed to extend my troops so as to fill up the interval; and my command was moved almost two div
er of Hood's irruptions, to Rough-and-Ready; Thomas to a point designated as Couch's; while Howard, encountering more resistance, halted at dark: having crossed Flint river, barely half a mile from Jones-borough. Hood had, because of Kilpatrick's recent raid, and to guard his communications, divided his army; sending half, under impel Thomas and Schofield in that direction, leaving Garrard's cavalry to watch our rear toward Atlanta, while Kilpatrick should hasten down the west bank of the Flint and strike the railroad below Jonesborough. Davis's corps, being on Thomas's right, soon closed on to Howard, relieving Blair's (15th) corps, which was at once dr ordered a vigorous pursuit in force of Hardee's beaten column. Hardee was found well intrenched, near Lovejoy's, with his flanks covered by Walnut creek and Flint river — a strong position, which was thoroughly reconnoitered, but Sherman was in no hurry to attack it. Soon, flying rumors, then more trust-worthy accounts, importe
o the utmost the twenty days bread, forty days beef, coffee, sugar, &c., and three days forage, contained in our wagons. Helping the trains across the Ocmulgee and its tributaries, and up the long, steep hills beyond, had been the principal labor of the march; which was intended to average 15 miles per day. Kilpatrick held the laboring oar. Moving south Nov. 15. from Atlanta with Howard, he had been confronted at East Point by Rebel cavalry; with whom he skirmished, driving them to Flint river, which he crossed at Jonesboroa at 7 A. M. next day; following the enemy to Lovejoy's, where they had taken post in the old Rebel works, having two guns. Dismounting Murray's brigade, Kilpatrick attacked and carried the works, capturing 50 prisoners; Atkins's brigade soon after charging the fleeing foe, and taking their guns. Kilpatrick pushed thence by McDonough and Monticello to Clinton; whence he made a dash at Macon, driving in the enemy's cavalry; but was unable to carry the defens
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