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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Frankland, state of. (search)
Frankland, state of. In 1784, North Carolina ceded her western lands to the United States. The people of east Tennessee, piqued at being thus disposed of, and Dec. 14, 1784, they resolved to form an independent State, under the name of Frankland. A provisional government was formed; Sevier was chosen governor (March, 178of oblivion as to all who should submit. But the provisional constitution of Frankland, based upon that of North Carolina, was adopted (November, 1785) as a permanety sent a delegate to the legislature of that State. Party spirit ran high. Frankland had two sets of officers, and civil war was threatened. Collisions became frhe latter were defeated, and finally arrested, and taken to prison in irons. Frankland had received its death-blow. The Assembly of North Carolina passed an act of oblivion, and offered pardon for all offenders in Frankland in 1788, and the trouble ceased. Virginia, alarmed by the movement, hastened to pass a law subjecting t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of Tennessee, (search)
l Valley and began a settlement in the southwest corner of State seal of Tennessee. Virginia. These early settlers were known as the Watauga Association from 1769 to 1777. The territory was represented in the North Carolina legislature as the District of Washington. In 1785 the State of Frankland (q. v.) was organized, but was reunited with North Carolina in 1788, and the next year that State ceded the territory to the national government. John Sevier (q. v.), first governor of Frankland, stands out as one of the most prominent and picturesque figures in the early and formative history of Tennessee. He was called the greatest of Indian fighters, having fought against the savage Creeks, Choctaws, and Cherokees— the bravest, most warlike, and most blood-thirsty of all the native tribes east of the Mississippi. The settlers were constantly menaced by them, and nothing had saved the stouthearted pioneers from total extermination except their rude log forts and the sleepless
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
at the Court of George III.......June 1, 1785 Don Diego Gardoqui, minister from Spain to the United States, recognized by Congress......July 2, 1785 Treaty of amity and commerce concluded between the King of Prussia and the United States, and signed by Thomas Jefferson at Paris, July 28, Benjamin Franklin at Passy, July 9, and J. Adams at London......Aug. 5, 1785 Franklin returns to Philadelphia from France, after an absence of nine years, landing......Sept. 13, 1785 State of Frankland formed from western lands of North Carolina......November, 1785 Eleventh Continental Congress adjourns; 298 days session......Nov. 4, 1785 Twelfth Continental Congress meets at New York......Nov. 7, 1785 John Hancock, of Massachusetts, chosen president of the Continental Congress......Nov. 23, 1785 [Did not serve owing to illness.] James Rumsey succeeds in propelling a boat by steam and machinery on the Potomac......March, 1786 First spinning-jenny in the United States
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Louisiana, (search)
s his commission as governor......June 2, 1786 Gen. James Wilkinson reaches New Orleans in June with a small cargo of tobacco and other goods. Perhaps to advance mercantile schemes he has interviews with Governor Miro and professes accord with him in seeking a rupture between the western and eastern United States, and increase of Spanish power in America. He returns to Philadelphia......September, 1787 Settlers from western North Carolina arrive, after failure to erect the State of Frankland......March, 1789 French refugees from Santo Domingo reach New Orleans, and a few of them open the first regular theatre in the city......1791 Don Francois Louis Hector, Baron de Carondelet, succeeds Miro as governor and intendant of Louisiana......January, 1792 Publication of the first newspaper in Louisiana, Le Moniteur de la Louisiane......1794 Genet, the French ambassador to the United States, plans an expedition against the Spanish dominions, and a society of French Jacobin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Carolina, (search)
y meets at Jonesboro, chooses John Sevier president, and forms a constitution for the State of Frankland......Dec. 14, 1784 Constitution for the new State of Frankland accepted by a convention of Frankland accepted by a convention of the people, which meets at Greenville and chooses John Sevier to be governor of the State......November, 1785 Governor Caswell, of North Carolina, by proclamation denounces the revolt of FranklaFrankland as usurpation, and warns all to return to their allegiance to North Carolina......April 14, 1786 State of Frankland continues to exist under difficulties for about two years, courts being held Frankland continues to exist under difficulties for about two years, courts being held by both governments, military officers appointed, and taxes levied which people pay to neither, until the legislature of Frankland at Greenville authorizes the election of two representatives to the Frankland at Greenville authorizes the election of two representatives to the legislature of North Carolina, members of Assembly are elected by the people, and the new State is reabsorbed......September, 1787 William Blount, Richard Dobbs, Spaight, and Hugh Williamson sign
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tennessee, (search)
sboro, choose John Sevier president, and form a constitution for the State of Frankland......Dec. 14, 1784 Governor Caswell, of North Carolina, pronounces the revolt of Frankland usurpation......April 14, 1785 Constitution for Frankland, or the State of Franklin, accepted by a convention of the people at Greeneville, whichFrankland, or the State of Franklin, accepted by a convention of the people at Greeneville, which chooses John Sevier as governor......Nov. 14, 1785 Capt. James White and James Connor settle on the site of Knoxville......1786 At a conference upon the legality of the State of Frankland it is agreed that the inhabitants are at full liberty and discretion to pay their public taxes to either the State of North Carolina or the State of Frankland ......March 20, 1787 Legislature of Frankland meets for the last time at Greeneville, and government reverts to North Carolina......SepteFrankland meets for the last time at Greeneville, and government reverts to North Carolina......September, 1787 Deed conveying to the United States territory west of the Alleghany Mountains accepted by act of Congress, approved......April 2, 1790 William Bloun
0, 12/10, 13/10, 15/10 of an inch in diameter respectively. The Bude burner has two or three concentric Argand rings. The Winfield-Argand has a metallic button above the annulus to deflect the central current laterally. A contraction of the chimney above the jet has a similar effect upon the exterior envelope of air. Gas-burners. Leslie's Argand has a series of small tubes arranged in a circle, which eject the gas in a conical form just below the contraction of the chimney. Frankland's burner e is an Argand with two chimneys, the outer one standing on a plate so as to be closed at bottom, and the air passing between the two for the supply of the flame. Faraday's ventilating burner f removes the products of combustion, and prevents their mingling with the air of the apartment. It is shown in vertical and horizontal section, the arrows indicating the course of the air, and s being the exit-pipe for the effete air and gases. g is a three-slit burner. h is a soap
commercial distress of the States after the Revolution. how New England suffered. the South then reckoned the seat of future empire. the people and strength of America bearing Southwardly. emigration to the South. Kentucky and the vales of Frankland. Virginia's prosperity. her early land system. the Chesapeake. Alexandria. George Washington's great commercial project. two pictures of Virginia: 1789 and 1829. an example of the decline of the South in material prosperity. this declin There was the prosperous agriculture to tempt him that had made Virginia the foremost of the British colonies. There were the fertile and undulating prairie lands of Kentucky to invite and reward his labours. There were the fruitful vales of Frankland — a name then given to the western district of North Carolina--to delight his vision with the romances of picturesque prosperity. To these regions the Northern emigration flowed with steady progress, if not with the rapidity and spirit of a ne