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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 10: the last invasion of Missouri.--events in East Tennessee.--preparations for the advance of the Army of the Potomac. (search)
everywhere showed, by their boldness and activity, a determination to repossess the State, if possible. Their cavalry roamed at will over all the region below the Arkansas, after Steele retreated to Little Rock, plundering and overawing the Unionists. Nor did they confine themselves to that region. Late in June 1864. Shelby, with a considerable body of Confederate cavalry, dashed across the Arkansas eastward of Little Rock, and pushed on to the White River, on the eastern border of Arkansas County, where they were attacked and thrown back, in the vicinity of St. Charles, by four regiments under General Carr, with a loss of about four hundred men, of whom two hundred were made prisoners. Carr's loss was about two hundred. Shelby was speedily re-enforced by Marmaduke, when Carr was pushed northward to Clarendon, when he, in turn, was re-enforced, and the Confederates retreated southward. This bold movement was followed by others in that section of the State. In July about fou
rst Wisconsin battery, Capt. Foster commanding, and a section of the Illinois Mercantile battery, under Lieutenant Wilson, were with Col Lindsey. The cavalry were disposed in the rear, under orders to force stragglers to return to their ranks. Such was the disposition of the forces under my command on the eve of the battle of the Arkansas. On the other hand, the position of the enemy, naturally strong, was one of his own choosing. Post Arkansas, a small village, the capital of Arkansas county, is situated on elevated ground above the reach of floods, and defining for some miles, the left bank of the river. It was settled by the French in 1685, is fifty miles above the mouth of the river; one hundred and seventeen miles below Little Rock, and is surrounded by a fruitful country, abounding in cattle, corn, and cotton. Fort Hindman, a square full-bastioned fort, is erected within this village upon the bank of the river, at the head of a bend resembling a horseshoe. The ext
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.10 (search)
g when a crisis might arise. Personally, I was not yet wrought up to this fine susceptiveness, though, probably, I had as quick a spirit as any fire-eater in Arkansas County. What I might do if my patience was abused, or how much bullying would be required to urge me to adopt the style in vogue, was, however, as yet undetermined. which hitherto I had regarded as being only fit for merchants and bearded men. Thus stimulated to think that the events of the time affected the people of Arkansas County, even youths like myself, I began to read the Pine Bluff paper, and to be more inquisitive; and it was not long before I had a vague conception that the countle Rich, of Richmond Store, gave in his name. Henry Parker, the boy nephew of one of the richest planters in the vicinity, volunteered, until it seemed as if Arkansas County was to be emptied of all the youth and men I had known. About this time, I received a parcel which I half-suspected, as the address was written in a femini
apt. Donelson McGregor, of Pine Bluff; Company E, Saline county, Capt. William A. Crawford, of Benton; Company F, Pulaski county, Capt. William F. Martin, of Little Rock; Company G, Jackson county, Capt. A. C. Pickett, of Augusta; Company H, Arkansas county, Capt. Robert H. Crockett, of DeWitt; Company I, Drew county, Capt James Jackson, of Monticello; Company K, Arkansas county, Captain Quertermous, of DeWitt. The regiment was immediately ordered to Richmond, and on the road attracted much aM. Duffie (promoted captain and major), Second Lieut. Nick Ketchum, Third Lieut. Robert A. Lea. Company D, Ouachita county, Capt. J. W. Kingswell, First Lieut. J. H. Scroggins, Second Lieut. E. N. Hill, Third Lieut. J. H. Croxton. Company E, Arkansas county, Capt. Sam G. Smith (promoted colonel), First Lieut. William F. Douglas, Second Lieut. J. T. Armstrong, Third Lieut. Charles Notrebe. Company F, LaFayette county, Capt. Sam H. Dill, First Lieut. E. B. Rutherford, Second Lieut Thomas Brown,
The steamer H. D. Mears arrived yesterday afternoon from Vicksburg, having on board tour military companies from Arkansas, as follows: Etonia Guards, Capt. Martin, from Pulaski county, numbering 70 men; Crockett Guards, Capt. Crockett, Arkansas county, numbering 116 men; DeWitt Guards, Capt. Quartermans, Arkansas county, numbering 70 men; Monticello Guards, Capt. Jackson, Drew county, numbering 103 men. These companies make a handsome and imposing appearance, and are en route for Lynchbur The steamer H. D. Mears arrived yesterday afternoon from Vicksburg, having on board tour military companies from Arkansas, as follows: Etonia Guards, Capt. Martin, from Pulaski county, numbering 70 men; Crockett Guards, Capt. Crockett, Arkansas county, numbering 116 men; DeWitt Guards, Capt. Quartermans, Arkansas county, numbering 70 men; Monticello Guards, Capt. Jackson, Drew county, numbering 103 men. These companies make a handsome and imposing appearance, and are en route for Lynchburg.
ey are only so many triumphs, each for the time unparallel, and each rising in dignity and importance above the other. But the other day we beat them badly in the field at Murfreesborough and Vicksburg. They have made themselves amends, after their fashion, by a great victory at Arkansas Post. With regard to the details of this exploit, as published by as yesterday from the New York Herald, we must say that we are utterly incredulous. Arkansas Post is an old French settlement in Arkansas county, on the Arkansas river, about one hundred miles above the mouth. It was a post during the existence of the United States, and was held by a small force, never more, we believe than two or three companies. There were no fortifications there, and, as far as we can learn from the most diligent inquiry at the proper source, no considerable body of troops. At the utmost it is not believed that there were more than four or five hundred. Yet the Yankee paper victory calls for 7,000 prisone
The Daily Dispatch: April 22, 1864., [Electronic resource], Capture of Plymouth, N. C.--Twenty-five hundred prisoners and thirty pieces of artillery taken. (search)
seen lurking about wharves, boats, or boat-yards, are to be arrested, and all ferrying is prohibited. Miscellaneous The U S gunboat Chenango exploded her boilers at the Brooklyn Navy-Yard on Friday last, tearing the boat to pieces and causing a fearful less of life. Out of thirty-five men injured by the explosion 22 had died up to Sunday evening, and three others were not expected to live until morning. The officers of a New Orleans steamer, arrived at Cairo, report that the rebel forces under Gen Wirt Adams drove the Yankee troops from the Big Black river a week ago, and took several hundred prisoners Mr. Nixon, State Representative from Franklin Co., Ark, has been murdered, and the representative from Arkansas county "kidnapped," as nothing had been heard from him. Deserters from Johnston's army reported to the Federals that Hardee's corps had gone to Virginia. The celebrated guerilla, Reynolds, is reported to have been captured near Knoxville, Tenn.