Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Sullivan (Indiana, United States) or search for Sullivan (Indiana, United States) in all documents.

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one on the East Tennessee and Georgia railroad on Hiawassee River, Bradley County. Five minutes after the guard passed through, the whole bridge was in flames. Two bridges on the East Tennessee and Georgia railroad on Lick Creek, Green County, and another on Holstein River, were also burned. The guard at Lick Creek were unarmed. They were overwhelmed, tied, and carried away and kept during the day. The bridge on Holstein River was not guarded. It was thought unnecessary to guard it, Sullivan County being strongly Southern in feeling. The bridge at Holstein River is at Strawberry Plains. In Jefferson County the bridge was fired, but the fire was put out by the people. The city of Savannah, Ga., was in a state of intense excitement. The news of the capture of the Walker battery on Hilton Head, and the arrival of retreating troops, among them many of the wounded, aroused the intensest feeling. Everybody was in the street, and large crowds collected around the news and telegra
at Tampa Bay, Florida, by the national gunboat Tahoma; about the same time she destroyed the schooner Mary Jane.--A detachment of the First Missouri and Fifth Ohio cavalry under Major Henry, of the Fifth Ohio, four hundred strong, while on a reconnoissance, was surrounded near Fernando, Miss., by General Chambers, with two thousand rebels. They were routed and most of them captured or killed. Major Henry was taken prisoner. Fletcher Freeman, the National enrolling officer of Sullivan County, Indiana, was shot and instantly killed, while riding along a country road.--Chambersburgh, Pa., was evacuated by the rebels under Jenkins, who took up his line of march to Hagerstown.--A company of negroes arrived at Harrisburgh, Pa., from Philadelphia, but their services were declined by General Couch, on the ground that no authority had been granted by the War Department for the muster of colored troops into the service of the United States for a less period than three years.--three hundr