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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 3, 1860., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
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of Fort Crawford, in 1830, sent Lieutenant T. R. B. Gardenier to Jordon's Ferry, now Dunleith, with a small detachment, to prevent trespassing on the lead mines west of the Mississippi River and north to Missouri. In the autumn of 1831, Colonel Morgan died, and Colonel Zachary Taylor was promoted to the command of the First Infantry, who were then stationed at Prairie du Chien. The uneasiness about the Indians increasing, the regiment was ordered to Rock Island. It moved up the river in Mackinac boats, and passed the Dubuque mines en route. The Indians, who had collected in some force in the neighboring country, on hearing of this advance, returned to Iowa, fearing that a larger force might follow. The miners, on hearing rumors of a treaty, moved over to Galena and took possession of the lead mines. The Indians protested; and in consequence of an order from General McComb, Colonel Taylor sent a detachment of troops to remove the miners until the treaty could be signed, and the
warlike people to a few mendicant stragglers, and thus barbarism and natural forces combined to aid the early settlers to drive the Indians not only out of their possessions, but out of existence. Environed by superior numbers on all sides, but inured to hardship and danger, the pioneers pressed forward, their feet red with the blood of both whites and Indians, and acquired acre by acre the lovely country east of the Mississippi. The American Fur Company had their principal post at Mackinac, with outposts scattered at different points on and near the Upper Mississippi. This advance-guard of civilization became wealthy, but took their lives in their hands, and it was an even chance whether they came out with the peltries of animals with which to decorate the potentates and beauties of the old world, or left their scalps to accentuate the figures of a warrior's dance, and their bodies to feed the wild beasts. What these frontiersmen endured is, fortunately, not to be estimated
Md. (Fort McHenry´╝ë41.10 Fortress Monroe, Va.47.04 White sulphur Springs, Va37.54 Gaston, N. C.43.40 Charleston, S. C.43.63 Savannah, Ga.48.32 Key West, Fla.36.23 Fort Myers, Fla.56.55 Mt. Vernon Arsenal, Ala.66.14 Huntsville, Ala54.88 Natchez, Miss.53.55 New Orleans, La51.05 Baton Rouge, La60.16 Fort Brown. Texas33.44 Fort Bliss, Texas9.56 Fort Smith, Ark40.36 Washington. Ark54.50 Springdale, Ky.48.58 Marietta, Ohio42.70 Cleveland. Ohio37.61 Detroit. Mich.30.05 Mackinac, Mich.23.96 Richmond, Ind.43.32 Peoria, Ill41.25 Milwaukee, Wis.30.40 Fort Snelling, Minn.25.11 Muscatine, Iowa42.88 St. Louis, Mo.42.18 Fort Gibson, Ind. Ter.36.37 Fort Towson, Ind. Ter.51.08 Fort Leavenworth, Kan.31.74 Fort Kearney, Neb.25.25 Fort Randall, Dak.16.51 Fort Laramic, Wyoming15.16 Fort Massachusetts, Col.17.06 Fort Garland, Col6.11 Fort Craig, New Mexico11.67 Fort Marcy, New Mexico16.65 Fort Defiance, Arizona14.21 Salt Lake, Utah23.85 Fort Bridger, Utah6.12 Sa
elfare of the escaped slaves and their families congregated there. Receiving aid from friends at the North, she organized a school for them, and spent all her leisure hours in giving them instruction. One of the nurses she had brought thither desired to aid in the work, and obtaining needful books and charts she organized a school for Miss Humphrey at Shiloh. Mrs. Porter was very successful in this work. In her youth she had gathered an infant school among the half-breed children at Mackinac and Point St. Ignace, and understood well how to deal with these minds scarce awakened from the dense slumber of ignorance. The school flourished, and others entered into the work, and other schools were established. Ministering to their temporal wants as well, clothing, feeding, medicating these unfortunate people, visiting their hospitals as well as those of the army, Mrs. Porter remained at Memphis and in its vicinity until June, 1863. Her schools having by that time become well-e
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: the short story (search)
t might have come from the early period of Rose Terry Cooke. But soon one notes a change, a new sense of the value of background and of strongly individualized types for characters. By 1874 she was choosing the West for her materials. Her Solomon is a study of a unique character in an isolated German settlement on One-leg Creek which flows into the Tuscarawas River in Ohio, and her Jeanette and most of the other stories in Castle nowhere (1875) deal with the primitive French habitants on Mackinac and the islands of Lake Superior. She had been reading Harte. Later, in the South, she was stirred by the desolation and the poverty wrought by the war, and now with her heart in her work she wrote the first post-bellum Southern short stories founded upon the contrast between what was and what had been. And still later in Italy she caught again the soul of a people and wrought it into the tales to be collected under the title The front Yard. With each volume there had been an increase
The great gale on the Lakes. Detroit, Nov. 30. --Intelligence is received here of the loss of the schr. Circassian on the White Shoal Straits of Mackinac, in the late gale, with all on board. The propeller Ontonagon, which arrived at Collingswood to-day from Chicago, reports the propeller Kenosha at Mackinac. She has previously been reported ashore at the mouth of Gorgon Bay. The great gale on the Lakes. Detroit, Nov. 30. --Intelligence is received here of the loss of the schr. Circassian on the White Shoal Straits of Mackinac, in the late gale, with all on board. The propeller Ontonagon, which arrived at Collingswood to-day from Chicago, reports the propeller Kenosha at Mackinac. She has previously been reported ashore at the mouth of Gorgon Bay.