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ing morning. Captain Wetmore's Ninth Ohio Battery was also ordered to have one section (two Parrott guns) in readiness to accompany the command. The whole force amounted to some 2,300 men. Proper guards were left at this place and in the several camps. On the morning of the 21st we marched toward Cumberland Gap, with the hope of arriving there before the return of the rebel troops. But when we arrived within 2 miles of the Gap I was overtaken by a messenger (who had been sent to Claiborne County) with information that the rebels had made a forced march, and were by that time within their encampment. Asmyforcewasmuch too small to makean attack on their strong intrenchments, protected byheavy redoubts, I determined to remain in front of their works for a day or two, and make as complete an examination of their works as practicable. We advanced on the enemy's right and drove in their pickets; moved close to their right line of defense, and bivouacked for the night. On the mo
Madison Rifles, Madison county, Capt. Jos. R. Davis. Company D, Lowndes Southrons, Lowndes county, Capt. W. T. Wade. Company E, Bahalah Rifles, Copiah county, Capt. Octavius Gibbs. Company F, Southern Avengers, Columbus, Capt. George H. Lipscomb. Company G, Hill City Cadets, Vicksburg, Capt. Jesse E. White. Company H, Rankin Rifles, Rankin county, Capt. Geo. M. Miller. Company I, Yazoo Rifles, Yazoo county, Capt. S. M. Phillips, H. Powell, H. P. Garrison. Company K, Port Gibson Rifles, Claiborne county, Capt. William McKeever. The Ninth and Tenth, the Castor and Pollux of the Mississippi regiments of volunteers, rose and fell with the Confederacy, fighting side by side from start to finish, and, only because their ranks had been thinned in battle, were consolidated at Smithfield, North Carolina, in April, 1865, standing after consolidation as the Ninth Mississippi regiment, officered as follows: W. C. Richards, colonel; S. S. Calhoun, lieutenant-colonel; T. H. Lyman, major. Acc
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical. (search)
r comrades by the gallant manner in which they rushed through the blinding storm of lead to fill the gap on Ramseur's right. In the last fight at Petersburg the men of Harris' Mississippi regiment formed part of the force of 250 men who so long and stoutly held Fort Gregg, repulsing three assaults of Gibbon's division. After the war General Harris lived a while in Mississippi and then removed to California. Brigadier-General Benjamin G. Humphreys was born in Mississippi in 1808, in Claiborne county, where he grew up to manhood. When old enough he entered the United States military academy at West Point, but did not complete his course there. He became a planter in Sunflower county, and this was his occupation when the war began. He immediately raised a fine company which was assigned to the Twenty-first Mississippi. His commission as captain of this company was dated May 18, 1861. On the 11th of September, 1861, he was commissioned colonel of the Twenty-first. He led this re
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
the war in this enterprise, and we beg the warm sympathies, wise counsels, and active help of all lovers of the Truth of History. In Memoriam General B. G. Humphreys. Port Gibson, December 28th, 1882. At a called meeting of the Claiborne county branch of the Southern Historical Society, held at the Courthouse in Port Gibson, on this date, the following memorial was unanimously adopted: Memorial. I. When a noble citizen dies, it becomes the community in which he lived to stop ife that were relentless even amidst the infirmities of age, he wrapped his mantle about him, ready to be gathered unto his fathers, and his spirit passed calmly and peacefully into the audience chamber of the blest. He was born in Claiborne county, Mississippi, in 1808, of a house and lineage, to the honor of which no word need be spoken before this assembly. As a youth he evidently manifested a precocity that encouraged his father to give him special educational advantages, which at tha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), In Memoriam General B. G. Humphreys. (search)
In Memoriam General B. G. Humphreys. Port Gibson, December 28th, 1882. At a called meeting of the Claiborne county branch of the Southern Historical Society, held at the Courthouse in Port Gibson, on this date, the following memorial was unanimously adopted: Memorial. I. When a noble citizen dies, it becomes the community in which he lived to stop for awhile the hum of business and pursuit of pleasure, to consider the lesson taught by his life-work, and to bear testimony to his virtues. The late Benjamin G. Humphreys was such a citizen. As a son, he was obedient and affectionate; as a brother, social and kind; as husband and father, loving and considerate; as a friend, steadfast and true; as legislator and ruler, wise in counsel, prudent in action; as a soldier, brave and zealous; in all the relations of life pure and without reproach; in all things setting an example worthy of universal imitation. II. As brothers-in-arms with him, in a cause dearer to his loyal
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Life and character of Ex-Governor B. G. Humphreys of Mississippi. (search)
r. Benjamin G. Humphreys, a native of your own soil, your friend and neighbor, a man of unblemished character, an actor in many scenes, the hero of many battles, is no more. As if conscious that his end was near, and weary of the struggles of life that were relentless even amidst the infirmities of age, he wrapped his mantle about him, ready to be gathered unto his fathers, and his spirit passed calmly and peacefully into the audience chamber of the blest. He was born in Claiborne county, Mississippi, in 1808, of a house and lineage, to the honor of which no word need be spoken before this assembly. As a youth he evidently manifested a precocity that encouraged his father to give him special educational advantages, which at that early day were purchased at great expense and inconvenience. He passed through a preparatory course in a classical school at Morristown, New Jersey, a State long ago famous for its educational facilities, and afterwards received an appointment of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of Fredericksburg.—From the morning of the 20th of April to the 6th of May, 1863. (search)
back against and blinding for the time my left eye. This attracted my attention to Marye's Hill, and though I could only go one eye on it, I saw enough to satisfy myself that I was cut off from the brigade, with the enemy on my right flank. I attempted to change front, and form on the plank road facing Marye's Hill, but soon found that road enfiladed by a battery near Mary Washington's monument, which forced us to retreat. Lieutenant Price Tappan, of Vicksburg, and Frank Ingraham, of Claiborne county, both accomplished soldiers and gentlemen, were killed and left on the hill. Lieutenant Mills, of Leake county, lost his leg, and was captured. The third company of the Washington Artillery lost its gun and some of the men. The fourth company lost its two guns. Lieutenant De Russy was knocked down by a fragment of shell and badly contused. Privates Lewis and Maury killed, and several captured. The whole story of the 3d of May, 1863, at Marye's Hill, was fully told, though not ami
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.49 (search)
where they remained in camp for about a week, and then removed to Corinth, Miss. There, in May, 1861, the 12th Mississippi Infantry Regiment was organized, composed of the following companies: Charles Clark Rifles, from Jefferson county; Raymond Fencibles, from Hinds county; Sardis Blues, from Panola county; Pettus' Relief, from Copiah county; Natchez Fencibles, from Adams county; Vicksburg Sharpshooters, from Warren county; Lawrence Rifles, from Lawrence county; Claiborne Guards, from Claiborne county; Sartartia Rifles, from Yazoo county, and Durant Rifles, from Holmes county. Richard Griffith, who was adjutant of Jeff Davis' Mississippi Regiment during the Mexican war, was elected colonel; W. H. Taylor, lieutenant-colonel; Dickinson, major; W. M. Inge, adjutant; J. H. Capers, sergeant-major; M. S. Craft, surgeon, and Rank Dickson, quartermaster. From Corinth, Miss., the regiment was transferred to Union City, Tenn., in May, 1861. There we camped until the 18th of July, losing a
iable authority, that a prominent member of the Convention, and a leading Unionist in East Tennessee, states there are four in the Convention for rebellion where there is one against it; if so, we may expect warm times in East Tennessee. A large majority of the Unionists in East Tennessee would be willing to submit to the action of the State, if let alone by their leaders; but Johnson, Nelson, Maynard & Co., seem determined upon our destruction.--A terrible retribution awaits them. Nelson and Maynard are the controlling spirits of the Convention — they can direct it for weal or woe; we wait the result. If they decide for war against Tennessee, they shall have it to their heart's content. Johnson has gone into Kentucky, via Cumberland Gap. On his route, he told the Union men of Claiborne county to hold out; he would have them arms and men to help them in a short time. What his plans are, we can only surmise; but rest assured our party in East Tennessee is wide awake. J. N. S.
their services to assist in nursing the sick at the military hospital in that place, and are rendering valuable aid in that way. The Nashville Gazette states that the powder mills of Mr. Whiteman, in Coffee county, is now turning out 2,000 pounds of powder per day. It is said to be of the best quality for military purposes. The Lincolnites are in strong force in the adjoining Kentucky counties, whence, in considerable numbers, they make frequent raids into Campbell, Scott and Claiborne counties, Tenn., stealing negroes and horses, and sometimes capturing citizens. The Knoxville Register says these nests will soon be broken up. Order from Gen. Huger concerning Letters sent to Yankee land. For the information of the public, we inert the following order: Headq's Department of Norfolk, Norfolk, Va., Dec. 26, 1861. Hereafter no letter exceeding one page of or tinary-sized letter paper will be sent to the United States by flag of truce. Benj. Huger, Jr.,
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