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at New York.--Western Virginia almost unanimously voted in favor of a division of the State.--The funeral of Col. Edward D. Baker, who was killed at the battle of Ball's Bluff, took place at Washington, D. C. The remains were deposited in the congressional burying ground.--Reports were circulated throughout the country that Gen. Banks had been killed and his army slaughtered, that Gen. Sickles' brigade had suffered a similar fate, and that the Confederates had crossed the Potomac, both above and below Washington.--Baltimore American, October 25. This night a skirmish occurred between Gen. Ward's pickets and a scouting party of about one hundred rebels in Green County, to the southwest of Campbellsville, Kentucky. The captain of pickets unfortunately was taken prisoner, but the National forces suffered no other loss, though there were several of the rebels killed and wounded. A Tennesseean who was attached to the Federal forces killed two of them.--Louisville Journal, October 26.
t the third managed to escape by jumping out and wading to the shore with a bag of letters.--(Docs. 132 and 138.) Five railroad bridges were burnt in East Tennessee by Unionists. Two on the Georgia state road, two on Chickamange Creek, Hamilton County, and one on the East Tennessee and Georgia railroad on Hiawassee River, Bradley County. Five minutes after the guard passed through, the whole bridge was in flames. Two bridges on the East Tennessee and Georgia railroad on Lick Creek, Green County, and another on Holstein River, were also burned. The guard at Lick Creek were unarmed. They were overwhelmed, tied, and carried away and kept during the day. The bridge on Holstein River was not guarded. It was thought unnecessary to guard it, Sullivan County being strongly Southern in feeling. The bridge at Holstein River is at Strawberry Plains. In Jefferson County the bridge was fired, but the fire was put out by the people. The city of Savannah, Ga., was in a state of intens
mmitted depredations on public and private property.--Columbia, Pa., was placed under martial law, and Captain Samuel J. Randall, of the Philadelphia City Troop, was appointed Provost-Marshal; the citizens of the town were seized and sent to work on the intrenchments.--Wrightsville, Pa., was evacuated by the rebels.--the Forty-fifth regiment of Massachusetts volunteers, returned to Boston from Newbern, N. C.--National troops enforced the enrolment, and arrested deserters, in Sullivan and Green counties, Ind.--Captain Jones, with a detachment of the First New York cavalry, had a sharp engagement with a party of rebel horsemen belonging to the command of General Imboden, at McConnellsburgh, Pa., defeating them and driving them out of the town.--(Doc. 85.) General Bragg abandoned his fortifications on the north side of Duck River, Tenn., and made a hasty retreat toward Tullahoma.--the rebels approached to a point on the Reistertown road seven miles from Baltimore, Md., creating a gre
that oath. By order of the Commander-in-Chief, the corps of the Army of the Potomac were reduced to three, namely, the Second, Fifth, and Sixth corps. The First and Third were temporarily reorganized and distributed among the Second, Fifth, and Sixth. Major-General G. K. Warren was assigned to the command of the Fifth corps, General W. S. Hancock continued to command the Second corps, and Major-General Sedgwick the Sixth. A daring rebel raid was made into the southern part of Green County to within five or six miles of Springfield, Mo., by a band of rebels numbering from eight to twelve, yesterday. Among the number were Louis Brashears and William Fulbright, (youngest son of Ephraim Fulbright,) both formerly of that county. The citizens collected and drove them out of the county to-day, and in a little fight with them killed Fulbright. In their flight southward the rebels killed Elijah Hunt and one Dotson, both of whom had formerly been in the rebel service.--Missouri D
leading different regiments into action, and his presence gave confidence everywhere. I have the honor to be, sir, Your obedient servant, Ben McCulloch, Brigadier-General Commanding. Missouri Democrat narrative. Springfield, Green County, Mo., Sunday, August 11, 1861. Night before last, a little army of fifty-two hundred men moved in two columns on a march of twelve or fifteen miles, to attack a body of rebels twenty-two thousand strong. In a military point of view the move a late hour last evening, bringing away our wounded, reports our men comparatively few with those of the enemy, whose dead were lying thick under the trees. --St. Louis Democrat, August 15. New York Tribune narrative. Springfield, Green Co., Mo., Sunday, August 11, 1861. We have passed through one of the most terrible battles ever fought upon the continent, and, though we drove the enemy from his stronghold and successfully repulsed his repeated attempts to retake it, forced him t
leading different regiments into action, and his presence gave confidence everywhere. I have the honor to be, sir, Your obedient servant, Ben McCulloch, Brigadier-General Commanding. Missouri Democrat narrative. Springfield, Green County, Mo., Sunday, August 11, 1861. Night before last, a little army of fifty-two hundred men moved in two columns on a march of twelve or fifteen miles, to attack a body of rebels twenty-two thousand strong. In a military point of view the move a late hour last evening, bringing away our wounded, reports our men comparatively few with those of the enemy, whose dead were lying thick under the trees. --St. Louis Democrat, August 15. New York Tribune narrative. Springfield, Green Co., Mo., Sunday, August 11, 1861. We have passed through one of the most terrible battles ever fought upon the continent, and, though we drove the enemy from his stronghold and successfully repulsed his repeated attempts to retake it, forced him t
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 3: Missouri, Louisiana, and California. 1850-1855. (search)
bts, but none to us. He is now in Peru, living like a prince. With Meiggs fell all the lumber-dealers, and many persons dealing in city scrip. Compared with others, our loss was A trifle. In a short time things in San Francisco resumed their wonted course, and we generally laughed at the escapade of Meiggs, and the cursing of his deluded creditors. Shortly after our arrival in San Francisco, I rented of a Mr. Marryat, son of the English Captain Marryat, the author, a small frame-house on Stockton Street, near Green, buying of him his furniture, and we removed to it about December 1, 1853. Close by, around on Green Street, a man named Dickey was building two small brick-houses, on ground which he had leased of Nicholson. I bought one of these houses, subject to the ground-rent, and moved into it as soon as finished. Lieutenant T. H. Stevens, of the United States Navy, with his family, rented the other; we lived in this house throughout the year 1854, and up to April 17, 1855.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3.27 (search)
war commenced); Thomas B. Monroe, Jr., of Frankfort, Major; Joseph L. Robertson, of Montgomery county, Adjutant; Griff. P. Treobald, of Owen county, A. Q. M. (now of Louisville); George T. Shaw, of Louisville, A. C. S.; Dr. B. T. Marshall, of Green county, Surgeon; Dr. B. B. Scott, of Greenburg, Assistant Surgeon; Company A, Captain Joseph P. Nuckols, of Glasgow; Company B, Captain James Ingram, of Henderson; Company C, Captain James M. Fitzhenry, of Uniontown; Company D, Captain Willis S. Robended with Captain Scott, of McLean, Scott being made First Lieutenant; Company E, Captain Benjamin I. Monroe, of Frankfort, which blended with Captain Steele, of Woodford, Steel being made First Lieutenant; Company F, Captain John A. Adair, of Green county; Company G, Captain Tandy L. Trice, of Trigg county; Company H, Captain William P. Bramlette, of Nicholas; Company I, Captain Thomas W. Thompson, of Louisville, which blendid with Blanchard, of Mason (Blachard sought other service, and Samuel
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
, recalled to the valley the column which was marching on Gen. Johnston's flank — are all of deep historic interest, but will be omitted from these sketches, as we had not yet joined the valley army. It was, indeed, uncertain, whether Ewell would be sent to join Jackson, or be ordered to Richmond, and even after ordered to the valley there was a doubt as to what point we would go, until finally it was decided by our falling back to Gordonsville, and marching thence to Stanardsville, in Green county, where we had for a few days a very delightful camp-ground. On the afternoon of the 30th of April, Ewell entered Swift Run Gap, which Jackson had just left, to fulfill his plan of uniting with Gen. Ed. Johnson, then posted twenty miles west of Staunton, to strike Fremont's advance under Milroy. Ewell's division at this time, consisted of Gen. R. Taylor's Louisiana brigade, Gen. Trimble's brigade (consisting of the Twenty-first North Carolina, the Twenty-first Georgia, the Sixteenth M
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiseences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
headquarters. Colonel Munford pushed his advance down to New Market, and the Federal army immediately retreated to Strausburg, where they were busily engaged in fortifying against Jackson at the very time when the foot cavalry were thundering on McClellan's flank before Richmond. Our march was so secretly undertaken and so secretly executed that our higher officers, as well as the men, were in profound ignorance of our destination. At Charlottesville we expected to turn off through Green county to meet a rumored move of the enemy across the mountains. At Gordonsville I was told by the Presbyterian minister, at whose house Jackson made his headquarters, as a profound secret, not to be breathed, that we would move at daybreak on Culpeper Courthouse. We moved instead on Louisa Courthouse, where again we were deceived into thinking that we should move across by Spottsylvania Courthouse to meet McDowell's column coming down from Fredericksburg. At Frederick's Hall, Beaver Dam depo
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