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ted States-having been fairly paid a full and just compensation for their improvements, crops, and all such property as they left through necessity or choice. This single measure, says Dr. Starr, relieved the frontier of the entire east, carried forward the settlements at least one hundred miles, and gave to our citizens permanent occupancy of a region not surpassed in fertility and all the elements for successful agriculture by any portion of the State. The counties of Rusk, Cherokee, Anderson, Smith, Henderson, Van Zandt, Wood, Upshur, Hunt, Kaufman, Dallas, and others, were subsequently formed from territory which could not be safely peopled by whites till these treacherous Indians were expelled. The counties named above contained in 1870 a population of 116,370, with property assessed at $15,857,191. The faults charged against the white race in its dealings with inferior races must, in this case, be laid at the door of the United States, if anywhere, and not of Texas. The sa
ere taken there about December 1. Owing to the confinement of several hundred Confederate officers by us under fire on Cummings Point, Morris Island, the Confederates removed most of the Federal prisoners from the city of Charleston by the middle of October. This we heard of Oct. 13 from a Federal officer who escaped from Charleston and reported, Our prisoners, with the exception of the colored soldiers captured at Wagner, have been removed from Charleston. Florence Prison, Anderson County, South Carolina, was a stockaded enclosure surrounded by a ditch, comprising about twenty-three acres, some two miles from the town of Florence. Through the enclosure ran a stream of water the banks of which were bordered by a swamp. From the upper point of this stream water for drinking was obtained; the lower part carried off the filth. The prisoners had no other shelter than they themselves constructed,—generally little dirt huts partly built of wood, some covering holes in the ground. N
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 2: some shadows before. (search)
ld have successfully resisted a large force. In my journey through the Southern border counties, I found that a general feeling of confidence prevailed among our friends, because John Brown was near. Over the border the Missourians were remarkably quiet from June until October, from the belief that the old hero was in their vicinity. By the bad faith of Synder the farm was abandoned, and Captain Brown and Kagi came to Mr. Adair's, where I met them. The others were living in Linn and Anderson Counties. I called at the house about ten in the morning, and remained until past three in the afternoon. Another conversation. Captain Brown had been quite unwell, and was then somewhat more impatient and nervous in his manner than I had before observed. Soon after my arrival, he again engaged in conversation as to various public men in the Territory. Captain Montgomery's name was introduced, and I inquired how Mr. Brown liked him. The Captain was quite enthusiastic in praise of him, a
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, John Brown in Southern Kansas. (search)
ng to obtain possession of the land, and Synder agreed to sell. But though a brave, he was not specially an upright man, and, soon after making a bargain with John Brown, having a better offer, he broke the contract. The Captain had, in the interval, with the assistance of Kagi, Tidd, Stephens, Leeman, and another member of his company, prepared a very strong fortification, where they could have successfully resisted a large force. In my journey through the Southern border counties, I found that a general feeling of confidence prevailed among our friends, because John Brown was near. Over the border the Missourians were remarkably quiet from June until October, from the belief that the old hero was in their vicinity. By the bad faith of Synder the farm was abandoned, and Captain Brown and Kagi came to Mr. Adair's, where I met them. The others were living in Linn and Anderson Counties. I called at the house about ten in the morning, and remained until past three in the afternoon.
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
lliam Anderson Lowery, who was born in Anderson county, S. C., May 12, 1839. Just as he entered upoanburg, S. C., was born at Old Pendleton, Anderson county (now Pendleton), S. C., in 1831. His fatilitia before the war and who was born in Anderson county in 1804, was a farmer and died in 1857. ded at Williamsburg. After practicing in Anderson county for two years after the close of the war,lliam Eskew James William Eskew, of Anderson county, S. C., was born in Pickens district, March 2 John Eskew John Eskew was born in Anderson county, S. C., four miles west of where he now resid. Eskew Joseph A. Eskew was born in Anderson county, S. C., where he now resides, June 7, 1845. William D. Hall William D. Hall, of Anderson county, S. C., was born in that county, February 14,y in which he resided. He was born in Anderson county, S. C., October 30, 1837, being the son of Revolutionary soldier. Enoch was reared in Anderson county and was going to school in Anderson when [21 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
B, James M. Perrin, captain; Company C, J. J. Norton, captain; Company D, F. E. Harrison, captain; Company E, Miles M. Norton, captain; Company F, Robert A. Hawthorn, captain; Company G; G. McD. Miller, captain; Company H, George M. Fairlee, captain; Company K, G. W. Cox, captain; Company L, J. B. Moore, captain. The regiment was composed of the ten companies of one hundred men each—Companies B and G from Abbeville county; Companies A, C, E, F, Pickens county; Companies D, K and L, Anderson county; Company H, Marion county. On July 20th the regiment was mustered into Confederate service for three years, or during the war, being the first, I believe, to enlist for the war. Few, if any, thought that the war would continue for three years. The general impression was that six to twelve months would end the war and secure our independence. Some of us were afraid it would all be over before we reached the front. The drills and camp duty we thought very hard. In a few weeks a majo
Fires at the South Fort Gaines, Ga., Nov. 7. --A fire here to lay consumed the agency of the Bank of Columbus, and several stores and dwellings.--Loss $40,000. Charleston, Nov. 8. --A fire occurred yesterday, at Williamston's Springs, in Anderson county, destroying the hotel and furniture, valued at $60,000 and R. F. Marsden's store and goods. Insured in Northern companies for $10,000; loss $12,000.
The funeral of Kelly Low, a colored minister at Augusta, Ga., on Sunday last, was attended by over four thousand persons, black and white. Rev. Basil Manly, of Ala., has accepted the pastorate of the Baptist Church at Montgomery, Ala. In Anderson county, Ga., on the 31st ult., snow fall eight Inches deep, to the utter surprise of the "oldest inhabitant." Sales in New York, January 8, of $6,000 Va. 6's at 76; $5,000 do, at 75 ½, and $4,000 Tenn, 6's at 75.
Horrible Outrages by the Yankees in Anderson county, Ky. --The Louisville (Bowling Green) Courier, of the 1st inst., says: In Anderson county, we are informed the Federals are committing such excesses as have never been witnessed in this State since the savages were driven from its borders, Arson, robbery, plunder, violence, every species of lawlessness is perpetrated by them. The other day the house of Capt. Utterback was burned by them. A young gentleman named Thompson was tied to a tree, and whipped terribly, when his persecutors left him, bleeding, suffering, and helpless, to perish, as he would have done but for the timely assistance of a gentleman who accidentally found him. Stock is driven off, granaries emptied, hay and wheat stocks burned, and a fine bridge across one of the leading turnpike roads there was burned the other day in pure wantonning. This is a fair of Lincolnism in Kentucky.
Wanted-- Forty Negroes, To be employed at Tredegar Iron Works; and fifth to sixty to be employed at the Iron Mines, in batetourt county. J. R. Anderson -- Co. mh 21--5t
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