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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 2: some shadows before. (search)
ld have successfully resisted a large force. In my journey through the Southern border counties, I found that a general feeling of confidence prevailed among our friends, because John Brown was near. Over the border the Missourians were remarkably quiet from June until October, from the belief that the old hero was in their vicinity. By the bad faith of Synder the farm was abandoned, and Captain Brown and Kagi came to Mr. Adair's, where I met them. The others were living in Linn and Anderson Counties. I called at the house about ten in the morning, and remained until past three in the afternoon. Another conversation. Captain Brown had been quite unwell, and was then somewhat more impatient and nervous in his manner than I had before observed. Soon after my arrival, he again engaged in conversation as to various public men in the Territory. Captain Montgomery's name was introduced, and I inquired how Mr. Brown liked him. The Captain was quite enthusiastic in praise of him, a
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, John Brown in Southern Kansas. (search)
ng to obtain possession of the land, and Synder agreed to sell. But though a brave, he was not specially an upright man, and, soon after making a bargain with John Brown, having a better offer, he broke the contract. The Captain had, in the interval, with the assistance of Kagi, Tidd, Stephens, Leeman, and another member of his company, prepared a very strong fortification, where they could have successfully resisted a large force. In my journey through the Southern border counties, I found that a general feeling of confidence prevailed among our friends, because John Brown was near. Over the border the Missourians were remarkably quiet from June until October, from the belief that the old hero was in their vicinity. By the bad faith of Synder the farm was abandoned, and Captain Brown and Kagi came to Mr. Adair's, where I met them. The others were living in Linn and Anderson Counties. I called at the house about ten in the morning, and remained until past three in the afternoon.