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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McKinly, John 1780- (search)
McKinly, John 1780- ; jurist; born in Culpeper county, Va., May 1, 1780; admitted to the bar of Kentucky in 1801; removed to Huntsville, Ala.; was United States Senator in 1826-31; Representative in Congress in 1833-35. President Van Buren appointed him justice of the United States Supreme Court in 1837, which office he held until his death, in Louisville, Ky., July 19, 1852.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Morgan, William 1775- (search)
Morgan, William 1775- Freemason; born in Culpeper county, Va., in 1775; died by violence, Sept. 19, 1826. Was in the battle of New Orleans; and was a brewer in Toronto, Canada, in 1821. He was a resident, in 1826, of Batavia, N. Y., where he was seized, carried to Fort Niagara, and, as many persons have since believed, was drowned in Lake Ontario, because it was reported that he was about to publish an exposure of the secrets of Freemasonry. This affair created intense excitement and a new political party. See Anti-Masonic party.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Russell, William 1758-1825 (search)
Russell, William 1758-1825 Military officer; born in Culpeper county, Va., in 1758; entered the army of the Revolution at sixteen years of age; was a lieutenant in Campbell's regiment in the battle of King's Mountain; rose to the rank of captain in the war; and in 1793 commanded the Kentucky mounted volunteers, under. Wayne, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel. He was also in the War of 1812-15, and served, altogether, in about twenty campaigns. He was a representative in the legislature of both Virginia and Kentucky. He died in Fayette county, Ky., July 3, 1825.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stevens, Edward 1745-1820 (search)
Stevens, Edward 1745-1820 Military officer; born in Culpeper county, Va., in 1745; commanded a battalion of riflemen at the battle of Great Ridge, and was soon afterwards made colonel of the 10th Virginia Regiment, with which he joined the army under Washington and fought in the battle of Brandywine, saving a part of the army there from capture by his skill and bravery. After the battle of Germantown he was made a brigadier-general. He was distinguished in the battle near Camden and at Gu from capture by his skill and bravery. After the battle of Germantown he was made a brigadier-general. He was distinguished in the battle near Camden and at Guilford Court-house, and was highly commended by General Greene for his services. At the latter battle he was severely wounded. He was also distinguished at the siege of Yorktown. General Stevens was a State Senator from the organization of the State government in Virginia until 1790. He died in Culpeper county, Va., Aug. 17, 1820.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stevenson, Andrew 1784-1857 (search)
Stevenson, Andrew 1784-1857 Legislator; born in Culpeper county, Va., in 1784; became early distinguished in the profession of law; was first elected to the State House of Delegates in 1804; served there several terms and was speaker of that body; was a Democratic Representative in Congress in 1823-34, and during the last seven years was speaker. In 1836 he was appointed minister to England, where he remained till 1841, and then became rector of the University of Virginia, which he served during the remainder of his life. He died in Blenheim, Va., Jan. 25, 1857.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Swayne, Noah Haynes 1804- (search)
Swayne, Noah Haynes 1804- Jurist; born in Culpeper county, Va., Dec. 7, 1804; admitted to the bar in 1823; and began practice in Coshocton, O., in 1825; elected to the Ohio legislature in 1829; United States district attorney for Ohio in 1831-41. He became widely known in 1853 through his connection with the trial to secure insurance for the owners of the steamboat Martha Washington, which was destroyed by fire. He was a justice of the United States Supreme Court in 1862-81. He died, in New York City, June 8, 1884.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Thompson, Richard Wigginton 1809- (search)
Thompson, Richard Wigginton 1809- Statesman; born in Culpeper county, Va., June 9, 1809; admitted to the bar in 1834; began practice in Bedford, Ind.; member of Congress in 1841-43 and in 1847-49, and Secretary of the Navy in 1877-81. He resigned in the latter year and became chairman of the American committee of the Panama Canal Company. His publications include The papacy and the Civil power; History of the tariff; Footprints of Jesuits; and Recollections of sixteen Presidents from Washington to Lincoln. He died in Terre Haute, Ind., Feb. 9, 1900.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trimble, Isaac Ridgeway 1802- (search)
Trimble, Isaac Ridgeway 1802- Military officer; born in Culpeper county, Va., May 15, 1802; graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1822, and was assigned the duty of surveying the military road from Washington to the Ohio River; resigned in 1832 and became a civil engineer; was with various railroads as chief engineer till the outbreak of the Civil War, when he took command of the nonuniformed volunteers recruited to defend Baltimore from Northern soldiers. In the same year he was made colonel of engineers in Virginia and directed the construction of the field works and forts at Norfolk; was promoted brigadier-general on finishing that work, and then took charge of the location and construction of the batteries at Evansport on the Potomac River. With these batteries he blockaded the river against United States vessels during the winter of 1861-62. He also participated and won distinction in various battles, including Gaines's Mills, Slaughter's Mountain, Second Bul
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 5: Bible and colportage work. (search)
of John. He said, I have but one more step to take, and I shall be over the Jordan of death, and soon, in perfect peace, he passed away. I commit all into the hands of my Father in Heaven, and go forth to tell of Jesus' dying love. We must return to God and restore that of which we are robbing Him, if we would be blessed. Say to our Congress, restore to God His Sabbath by stopping the transportation and opening of the mails on the day of the Lord. Rev. A. M. Grimsley writes, from Culpeper county: God is blessing us up here. Many of our brave boys have professed conversion. God grant that the work may spread. Rev. C. F. Fry: The past month I have spent in Winchester, Woodstock, and Staunton. Several have expressed themselves as being anxiously concerned about the great salvation. It was, of course, a delightful work to point them to the sinner's Friend. I also found many truly devoted Christians, who seemed rejoiced to have a colporter come among them. They are eager to
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 4: country life at Groton. (1833-1836.) (search)
gene, who was her nearest companion, was now absent. Eugene and I, she writes in a later diary, were near of an age, and loved to wander out together, over the streams and through the woods, walking and talking or oftener silent. Ms. Diary, 1844. Eugene Fuller was not the most intellectual of her brothers, but the most winning and attractive; he had graduated at Harvard in 1834, and was at this time private tutor at the plantation of my uncle, Colonel Samuel Storrow, at Farley, Culpeper County, Virginia. This explains an allusion in the following letter, written by Margaret Fuller to her father during a temporary visit in Cambridge,--which I give to show how cordial a tie really united them, in spite of her criticisms. The dearest and most affectionate mean a good deal. Boston, June 2, 1835. Dearest father,--I was very glad to receive your letter although 't was but brief. You have of late omitted to write to me when I was absent, and I have felt as if you thought of me le
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