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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 16 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 12 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 12 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Frederick (Virginia, United States) or search for Frederick (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address on the character of General R. E. Lee, delivered in Richmond on Wednesday, January 19th, 1876, the anniversary of General Lee's birth (search)
mmense and morally infinite; in seven days absolutely undid what McClellan took six months to do, and by a single combination threw back his enemy from the hills in sight of Richmond to a defensive line in Washington's suburbs. This campaign, for its audacity, its wide combination, its insight into the opponent's character, its self-reliance, its vigor of execution, and its astonishing results, may be safely compared with the best campaigns of the greatest masters in the art of war — with Frederick's Leuthen, to which it bears as much likeness as a campaign of days can bear to a battle of hours, or with that greater feat, the amazing concentration by Washington of contingents from New York and from North Carolina, of new levies from the Virginia Valley, and of a French fleet from the West Indies to besiege and to capture the army of Cornwallis. It is argued that Lee was strong only in defence, and was averse to taking the offensive. Nothing could be more false. He was to prove i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Early's Valley campaign. (search)
all the troops in the vicinity of Washington had been collected, besides which a large number of quartermaster's employees had been improvised as soldiers, thus making the force at hand exceed twenty thousand men, while two corps from the army besieging Richmond and a part of another corps from North Carolina, intended to reinforce that army, had been detached and put in rapid motion for the defence of the Capital. In the face of these odds Early continued his advance into Maryland. At Frederick he found General Wallace, with about ten thousand men, in position to oppose the passage of the Monocacy. Immediate preparations were made to dislodge Wallace and effect a crossing of that stream. Rodes was thrown forward on the Baltimore and Ramseur on the Washington City road, while Gordon and Breckinridge, with a portion of Ransom's cavalry inclining to the right, moved to the fords a mile or two below the railroad bridge. At the same time the heights contiguous to the river were cro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General J. E. B. Stuart of cavalry operations on First Maryland campaign, from August 30th to September 18th, 1862. (search)
oke stirred every Southern heart with renewed vigor and enthusiasm. The main army moving to Frederick, the next day the cavalry resumed their march on the flank, halting at Urbanna, Hampton's brigound in the orders appended to this report, the cavalry was withdrawn to within three miles of Frederick. Lee's brigade having fallen back from New Market and crossed the Monocacy near Liberty, Roplaying any force, except a part of Burnside's corps, and built no camp fires in their halt at Frederick that night. The information was conveyed promptly to the Commanding General, through General s force. With a view to ascertain what the nature of this movement was, I had, before leaving Frederick, sent instructions to Brigadier-General Fitz. Lee to gain the enemy's rear from his position oation toward Crampton's gap up to that time, and apprehending that he might move directly from Frederick to Harper's Ferry, I deemed it prudent to leave Munford to hold this point until he could be r