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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 15 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 4 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 10 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 6 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox. You can also browse the collection for Orange County (Virginia, United States) or search for Orange County (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 12: Halleck and Pope in Federal command. (search)
Chapter 12: Halleck and Pope in Federal command. Centres of Activity gravitate towards Orange and Culpeper Counties Pope's unsoldierly preliminary orders Jackson's and Pope's encounter at Cedar Mountain confidence in and esteem for General Lee the Confederate commander's plans for cutting off Pope miscarry capture of Captain Fitzhugh with important orders Longstreet puts General Toombs under arrest General Pope withdraws. The Federals had by this time organized the Army of Virginia from the independent forces in the State,the First Corps under General Sigel, the Second under General Banks, the Third under General McDowell, commanded by Major-General John Pope, brought from the West for that object and appointed June 26. This army reported July 31, 46,858 strong, for field service. On the 23d of July, General H. W. Halleck assumed command of the Federal armies as general-in-chief, by order of the President of July 11. The quiet of General McClellan's army
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
n successful. Further testimony to this effect comes from another source: In East Tennessee, during the winter of 1863-64, you called me into your quarters, and asked me to read a letter just received from General Lee in which he used the following words: Oh, general, had I but followed your advice, instead of pursuing the course that I did, how different all would have been! You wished me to bear this language in mind as your correspondence might be lost. Erasmus Taylor. Orange County, Va. A contributor to Blackwood's Magazine reported,-- But Lee's inaction after Fredericksburg was, as we have called it, an unhappy or negative blunder. Undoubtedly the greatest positive blunder of which he was ever guilty was the unnecessary onslaught which he gratuitously made against the strong position into which, by accident, General Meade fell back at Gettysburg. We have good reason for saying that during the five years of calm reflection which General Lee passed at Lexington,