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The Daily Dispatch: may 6, 1861., [Electronic resource], Gen. Harney's account of his arrest and subsequent Adventures in Virginia. (search)
Orange County, Va. -- A correspondent writes: Little Orange county has done its duty so far nobly in sending troops to the field to defend the rights of the Old Dominion. With a voting population of about eight hundred, she has already in the field three well drilled companies — the Montpelier Guards, Captain S. B. Williams, Jr., the Gordonsville Grays, Captain W. C. Scott, and the Barboursville Guards, Captain Parson, mustering altogether about two hundred and fifty men, and two other companies just organized, and ready and willing to march at a minute's warning.-- They are the "Pisenfield" Rangers, Captain George Pannill, Jr., and the Browning Troop, Captain G. J. Browning. Each of the last named companies will number from seventy-five to one hundred and twenty-five men.
Arrested on suspicion. --A young man named Collins, a Virginia refugee, was arrested at Camp Curtin on Friday, on suspicion of being a spy. He was handed over to the civil authorities, and had a hearing before Mayor Kepner. His statement was that he is a miller by trade, from Pomeroy, Ohio, but for some time past has been working in Orange county, Va., which place he left because he would not serve in the military or take the test oath. He was twice arrested before he got out of Virginia. His intention was to go from here to visit an uncle in Cumberland county, but while here he had partially made up his mind to enlist. On the way from camp to the city on Saturday he informed persons that every person in Virginia was enlisting, and that the troops of Pennsylvania would have a stronger enemy to contend against than they had any idea of. For these remarks he was placed under military arrest. At the suggestion of District Attorney Herr, he took the oath of allegiance, and was p
ce is made up of sums borrowed in the name of the State and for which no account was made.--The laws of Vermont give the Treasurer authority to borrow to an unlimited extent — so great has been their reliance upon individual honesty up there. It was only discovered, therefore, that the ex-Treasurer had created any debt when a note of $9,000 at the Brattleboro' Bank fell due. Mr. Bates then looked for, had deeded away his property and fled!--The principal notes now discovered, going to make up the sum of $51,500, are: $15,000 with Lawrence Brainerd, of St. Albany; $9,000 with Abel Underwood; $4,500, Orange County Bank; $3,300, Lamoille County Bank; and lesser sums with seven other banks. Of course the State cannot dodge payment, as the Treasurer's name bound the State under the law. There is a further, and, it is feared, a larger defalcation in the Treasurer's settlement with the towns. Investigation shows that some of the towns have receipts in full and are credited only in part.
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.the military spirit in Orange, Orange C. H., July 16, 1861. All hall the little patriotic county of Orange, in the State of the glorious Old Dominion, the county that gave birth to a Madison, Barbour and Taylor. She has, according to population, more men in the field than any other county in the State. According to the last report of the Commissioner of the Revenue, she has a voting population of 1,000. She has now 600 volunteers in the field, and when her militia leaves, which will be in a few days, she will then have 850 or 900 as good men as ever pulled a trigger. What county in this any other State can beat it? Let us hear. H.
The Daily Dispatch: August 24, 1861., [Electronic resource], Contributions for the sick and wounded. (search)
Contributions for the sick and wounded. To the Editors of the Dispatch:--Please acknowledge through your paper the following contributions to the sick and wounded soldiers: Ladies of Grinald, Miss, through Mrs. Elizabeth Bew, Mrs. R. O. Ragsdale, Mrs. Kate Donkin, Committee, $68.50. Thos. M. Farish, late of Orange county, Va., now of New Orleans, $50. Mrs. M. J. Demelman, of Richmond, $5. Wyndham Robertson, of Richmond, $100. Col. C. R. Barksdale, $10.25. Mrs. W. T. Fourqueran, of Halifax, $5.00. Col. W. T. Fourqueran, of Halifax, $20.00--through Williams & Carrington. A small sum of money found in the purses of my two children after their death, (they loved the soldiers in their lives,) and small as it is, I send it to them by Mrs. Ann Malone, $1.60. Sundry citizens of Henrico, through Jonah Dobbs, $10. From visitors to Alleghany Springs, $64. Ladies of Rough Creek, Charlotte county, Va., through R. N. Andrews, one box containing valuables. Ladies of
of the Relief Association, of Charleston, S. C., through Richard Caldwell, Esq.100.00 Also, nine large boxes, baskets, &c., containing everything useful to the hospital. From Mrs. Dr. Wilburn, Mrs. William C. Eggleston, Misses Towns, Mrs. Mary Cocke and Miss Randall, ladies of Yallowbusha county, Mississippi, one box containing bed clothes, dried peaches, dried apples, wine, jelly, cordial, &c., &c. From Mrs. A. B. Miller, Junction S. S. R., Nottoway, one coop of chickens and one box of eggs; from Mrs. William Robertson, of Iberia, Louisiana, one box of clothing, bandages, &c.: from Mrs. Philip B. Jones, Orange county, Virginia, one bucket of butter; from Mrs. Eliza Fourqueran, of Halifax, Virginia, fifty chickens through Williams & Carrington; from Mrs. John W. Lampkin and other ladies, of Russell county, Virginia, box of clothing, &c.; from A. H., of Martinsville, two boxes and one barrel, wine, cordial, soap, &c., &c. Isaac. W. Walker, Chairman Committee on Collections.
To the voters of the 8th Congressional District, composed of the counties of Culpeper, Madison, Greene, Orange, Louisa, Spotsylvania, Caroline, Stafford, and King George. --Calls having been made upon one by a portion of you, to know whether I would serve you in the Confederate Congress if elected, he reply: Whilst none, through a vain ambition, should seek a seat in the councils of the country, diffidence should not prevent any one from taking a position to which the people may call him. The attention of the public is so absorbed in the conflict which is to decide the destiny of nations, that I regard it neither consistent with the wishes or tastes of the people to canvass the district, did time and engagements permit. I therefore concur in the example set by a distinguished candidate for your favor, in declining one. Should it be your pleasure to elect me, I shall endeavor to devote my humble abilities to the service of the country. I tender my thanks to those of my
Receiver's Notice. --sequestration of the property and Effects of alien Enemies.--I, the undersigned, Receiver for the counties of Orange, Stafford, Spotsylvania, (including the town of Fredericksburg.) Caroline, King George, Westmoreland, Richmond, Northumberland, Lancaster, Essex, Middlesex, Matthews, King & Queen, and Gloucester, de hereby notify each and every attorney agent, former partner trustee, corporation or officer thereof, or other person holding or controlling any lands, tenements, or hereditaments, goods or chattels, rights or credits, or any interest therein within the counties and town aforesaid of or for any alien enemy of the Confederate States of America, speedily and without delay to give information of the same to me, the undersigned, Receiver as aforesaid, and to render an account of the same, and, in so far as it be practicable, to place the same in my hands or under my control, which said several matters and things they and every one of them are hereby war
The Daily Dispatch: October 26, 1861., [Electronic resource], By the Governor of Virginia.--a Proclamation. (search)
The patriotism of the ladies. Orange C. H., Oct. 13, 1861. Editors Dispatch: The many noble deeds performed by the ladies of the State of Virginia towards our soldiers, who are battling for their country's cause, has been heralded in your valuable journal, not only editorially, but also through your numerous correspondents; but as yet I have never seen a word of praise awarded to the ladies of Orange Court-House and county of Orange, who justly deserve a portion of that honor you have so generously bestowed upon others. I hope, therefore, you will give this a place in your columns, as a proof that their kindness is fully appreciated, at least, by have been the recipients of their philanthropic acts. Since the battle of Bull Run there have been at least from four to five hundred sick and wounded soldiers in Orange Court-House and vicinity, the principal part of whom have been taken to private houses, and there nursed by the ladies with that assiduous care which they
Receiver's notice.--sequestration of the property and effects of alien enemies. --I, the undersigned, Receiver for the counties of Orange, Stafford, Spotsylvania, (including the town of Fredericksburg,) Caroline, King George, Westmoreland, Richmond, Northumberland, Lancaster, Essex, Middlesex, Matthews, King & Queen; and Gloucester, do hereby notify each and every attorney, agent, former partner, trustee, corporation, or officer thereof, or other person holding or controlling any lands, tenements, or hereditaments, goods or chattels, rights or credits, or any interest therein within the counties and town aforesaid of or for any alien enemy of the Confederate States of America, speedily and without delay to give information of the same to me, the undersigned, Receiver as aforesaid, and to render an account of the same, and, in so far as it be practicable, to place the same in my hands or under my control, which said several matters and things they and every one of them are hereby
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