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Legislature of Virginia. Senate. Monday, Dec. 16, 1861. The Senate was called to order at 12 o'clock. Prayer by the Rev. Dr. Read of the Presbyterian Church. The Salt Supple. A communication was received from the House of Delegates, announcing the adoption of a joint resolution for the appointment of a committee to visit the Salt Works in Smyth and Washington counties, and asking the concurrence of the Senate therein. The resolution was laid on the table, with a view to awaiting a report from the committee already appointed to open a correspondence with the proprietors of the Salt Works. Railway Connections. The President laid before the Senate a communication from the Executive, calling the attention of the General Assembly to the importance of extending the Covington and Ohio Railroad, and of forming a connection between the Orange and Alexandria, Manassas Gap, and Richmond and Fredericksburg Railroads. Laid on the table and ordered to be printed
Defences of Western Virginia. --The capacities of the Salines in Smyth county, for the production of salt, are equal to four millions of bushels a year for all time. The consumption of the South is about three millions and a half bushels of salt per annum; so that we have in a single depository of that mineral a capacity for more than supplying the entire Confederacy. The lead mines of Wythe, the county adjoining that of these salines, are among the richest and most productive in the world.--The lead is of a most rare good quality, and the limit to the production is only that which results from the amount of labor employed.--The Confederate Government obtains nearly its whole supply of lead from these mines.--The value of the se lead veins is only second to that of the depositories of salt hard by. One of the largest iron foundries in Western Virginia is a furnace in full operation in this same county of Wythe. We have already stated the fact that the Confederate Gove
The Daily Dispatch: January 21, 1862., [Electronic resource], Terrible affair in Franklin county, Ky. (search)
air. Prayer by Rev. Mr. Duncan. Several Senate bills were read and committed. The House bill to amend and re-enact the act providing for the issue of small notes was reported from the Senate with amendments, and was referred to the Committee on Banks. Mr. Robertson, of Richmond, from the Committee on Banks, reported "a bill concerning bank directors." Mr. Anderson, of Rockbridge, from the joint committee to confer with the lessees of the salt works in Washington and Smyth counties, made a report, which (it was not read by the Clerk) was ordered to be printed. The following resolutions of inquiry were referred to the appropriate committees: By Mr. Gatewood: Of remunerating Hill & brothers, of Woodstock, for merchandize furnished to the Virginia forces. By Mr. McCamant: What negotiation is necessary to protect the holders of negotiable paper, payable out of this State. Mr. Robinson, of Richmond, presented the petition of the Board of Commissioner
Virginia Legislature.Senate. Richmond, Jan. 22, 1862. The Senate was called to order at 12 o'clock, and the Rev. Henry A. Wise offered prayer. Mr. Dickinson, of Prince Edward, from the Joint Committee, charged with the duty of corresponding with the lessees of the Washington and Smyth county Salt Works, submitted a report, with the following resolutions: 1. Resolved by the General Assembly, That the provisional contract made by the joint Committee of the Senate and House of Delegates, for the purchase on behalf of the State, of four hundred thousand bushels of salt, to be furnished by Stuart, Buchanan & Co., be approved, and the same is hereby ratified and confirmed. Resolved, That the Committee be instructed to report a bill to carry into effect the provisions of said contract, and a proper distribution of said salt. On motion of Mr. Hall, these resolutions, with the report, were laid upon the table and ordered to be printed. [The report in substance
Salt for the people. Richmond, 27th Jan., 1862. Editors of Dispatch: I learn that a proposition is before the Legislature for the purchase of the salines lying on the line of Washington and Smyth counties at Saltville, in this State. I believe that the two contiguous estates, embracing these salines, and the lease under which they are now operated, can be procured for one million of dollars. I have some acquaintance with this property, and am persuaded that the purchase ought to be made at that price, if it can be done. The property is worth more than is demanded for it. It is in danger of passing into the hands of a joint stock company at a higher price than the State would be required to give, viz: at twelve hundred thousand dollars; to the capital of which company upwards of three hundred thousand dollars is already subscribed. Corporations have no souls, and if the works pass into a corporate ownership, they pass into the hands of a monopoly, having the single
er the resolution: Messrs. Wynne, Steger, Thomas, Payne, and Cazenove. Mr. Rutherford offered a resolution that the Committee on Courts of Justice be instructed to inquire what in their judgment, is the number required to constitute a vote of the House, which was adopted. The hour for the order of the day having arrived, the House took up the consideration of the report of the majority of the joint committee appointed to confer with the l ces of the Salt Works in Washington and Smyth counties. Mr. Anderson, of Rockbridge, moved that the report of the minority of the committee be substituted for that of the majority, and proceeded at some length to discuss the merits of the two reports. Mr. Crockett moved that, in view of the absence of several gentlemen interested in this section, the reports be laid on the table, which was adopted. On motion of Mr. Prinon, the House took up the bill to amend and re-enact the act of the Convention providing for the enrollment o
do so. Objection being made to the resolutions, they laid over a day under the rule. The following resolution of inquiry into expediency was referred to the appropriate commitee: By Mr. McKenney--Of furnishing horses to those who volunteer in the cavalry service of the State, retaining the 40 cents per diem until the purchase money is refunded. On motion of Mr. Crockett, the House took up the report of the joint committee appointed to confer with the lesses of the salt works in Washington and Smythe counties. After remarks by Messrs. Crockett and Baskervill, the subject was laid on the table. Mr. Woodson made an ineffectual effort to call up the question of filling the vacancies in the General Assembly from Northwestern Virginia. The following bills were passed: An act to amend section 14 of chapter 163 of the Gode, relative to the removal of records and papers of courts. An act concerning Treasury notes. The House then adjourned.
and call out certain military forces for the defence of the State" The bill to prevent the unnecessary consumption of grain by distillers and other manufacturers of spirituous and malt liquors was called up, and, a discussion ensuing, a substitute was offered by Mr. Collier, which was ordered to be printed, and the bill was laid on the table. The bill "to amend an ordinance of the Convention to provide for the organization of the Provisional Army for the State of Virginia," was communicated from the House, having passed that body. The joint resolution for the purchase of the sa t Works, in Smythe and Washington counties, by the State, was called up and discussed and finally made the order of the day for Saturday. Mr. Cazenove, from the House, informed the Senate of the passage by the former body of the bill authorizing field artillery to be made and small arms purchased for the State, with certain amendments. The latter were pending at the hour of adjournment.
r. Dickinson, of Prince Edward, the Senate proceeded to consider the question of a supply of salt. Two reports from committees were presented for consideration. The majority report favored the buying of the Preston estate and the salt works, in Smythe and Washington counties, at $300,000. The minority report advocated the purchase of 400.000 bushels of salt at seventy-five cents per bushel; which latter proposition was adopted after a lengthy debate. The Senate took up the reports on the of salt. Two reports from committees were presented for consideration. The majority report favored the buying of the Preston estate and the salt works, in Smythe and Washington counties, at $300,000. The minority report advocated the purchase of 400.000 bushels of salt at seventy-five cents per bushel; which latter proposition was adopted after a lengthy debate. The Senate took up the reports on the Washington and Smythe county salines, which were debated till the hour of adjournment.
harlotte, Prince Edward, Appomattox, Nottoway, Amelia, Cumberland, Buckingham, Powhatan, Chesterfield, Dinwiddie, Greensville, Sussex, Southampton, Surry, Jele of Wight, Nansemond, Norfolk, Princess Anne, Prince George, and the city of Petersburg. To report to Gen. J. B. Magruder, at Williamsburg: The forces from the counties of Charles City, Sew Kent, James City, King William, King and Queen, Essex, Middlesex, Gloucester, Mathews, Elizabeth City, Warwick, and the city of Richmond. The Militia of the following counties will not report at present, but will hold themselves in readiness to obey orders when issued by Gen. H. Heth, or Gen. H. Marshall: The counties of Giles, Monroe, Greenbrier, Mercer, Pocahontas, Tazewell, McDowell, Smythe, Wythe, Wyoming, Washington, Russell, Wise, Buchanan, Scott, and Lee. The Enquirer, Whig, and Dispatch, publish daily for one week, and all the country papers in the State will publish this proclamation three times. mh 10--1w
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