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g division of the railroad, had meditated a descent on Wheeling; but, finding themselves anticipated and outnumbered, they obstructed and destroyed the railroad west of them, so that the Unionists did not reach Grafton till the morning of the 30th. On the 31st, both tracks having been repaired, a force of seven or eight thousand men was collected at this point, under the immediate command of Gen. Morris; the Rebels having been pushed back, without resistance, to Philippi, the capital of Barbour county, some fifteen miles southward, and entirely off the line of the railroad. From this place, Col. G. A. Porterfield, as commander of the Virginia Rebel forces, issued the following proclamation: fellow-citizens: I am in your section of Virginia, in obedience to the legally constituted authorities thereof, with the view of protecting this section of the State from invasion by foreign forces, and to protect the people in the full enjoyment of their rights — civil, religious, and politic
nbrier River, and therefore seventeen miles west of the scene of the battle on Friday last. The troops of the enemy were supposed to number about five thousand, and supposed also to be under the orders of Gen. Reynolds, the same who commanded at Greenbrier. The troops on our side consisted of two Georgia regiments, Col. J. B. Baldwin's regiment of Virginia troops, and two Virginia battalions — the one commanded by Lieut.-Col. Hansbrough, of Taylor County, the other by Maj. Rogers, of Barbour County. There were also two field-batteries — the one commanded by Capt. Anderson, the other the battery of Capt. Rice. Our whole force numbered about two thousand, and were under the command of Col. Edward Johnson, of the Georgia troops, a native of Chester-field County, Va. It has already been stated that our army had fallen back from their entrenched camp at Greenbrier River, the scene of their former glory, and that a portion of our troops had been transferred elsewhere. Encouraged by
of Marion county, Capt. W. W. Arnett, afterward lieutenant-colonel Twentieth cavalry, succeeded by Capt. W. P. Thompson, promoted to colonel Nineteenth cavalry; B, of Highland county; C, of Harrison county, Capt. U. M. Turner, Lieuts. W. P. Cooper, Norval Lewis; D, of Gilmer county, Capt. J. S. K. McCutcheon, afterward lieutenant-colonel and wounded at Cedar Mountain, and Lieut. John Campbell; E, of Highland county; F, of Randolph county, Captain Harding; G, of Pocahontas county; H, of Barbour county, Capt. Thomas Bradford, Lieut. I. V. Johnson; I, of Lewis county, Capt. Alfred Jackson, of Weston, afterward lieutenant-colonel and wounded at Cedar Mountain, Lieut. Nathan Clawson. Col. William L. Jackson was the first in command, and early in 1862 was succeeded by John S. Hoffman, of Clarksburg. John G. Gittings, adjutant of the regiment two and a half years, was afterward adjutant-general of Jackson's cavalry brigade. These two regiments, the Twenty-fifth and Thirty-first, fought
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
nveyed over the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, some from Wheeling, but the greater part from Parkersburg, and at the little town of Philippi, the county seat of Barbour county, twelve miles south of the Parkersburg branch of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, on the third day of June, 1861, is where the van of General McClellan's vastkersburg pike, when you reach Beverley, that was the county seat of Randolph county. There you take Philippi pike, and you reach Philippi, the county seat of Barbour county, at a distance of thirty-one miles, and from Philippi to Grafton, over the Fitterman pike it is eighteen miles to Grafton. All of these roads were made by tfrom Highland county. Two companies of infantry from Pendleton county—one under Captain Anderson and the other under Captain Moorman: Two companies from Barbour county—one under Captain Reger and the other under a Captain Strums. One company from Upshur county, under Captain Higginbotham. And all other volunteer forces
A venerable volunteer. --In the ranks of the Louisville Blues, now at Montgomery, from Barbour county, is the Rev. Alexander McLenan, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, who with his two sons have enlisted with the company for the term of twelve months in the service of the Confederate States. In a speech made by him at Clayton on their way to Columbus, he remarked that "our cause was honored of God, and He would crown it with success." Mr. McLenan is upwards of sixty years of age, and the greater part of his manhood has been dedicated to the service of the ministry. Equality and justice to the South is a motto to which he has always been religiously devoted.--Columbus Sun.
List of Virginia Bank notes Unbankable in Richmond. Bank of the Valley and branches, save at Staunton and Christiansburg. Bank of Wheeling. Wheeling. Manufacturers' and Farmers' Bank of Wheeling and branches. Northwestern Bank of Virginia, Wheeling, and branches. Merchants' and Mechanics' Bank of Wheeling and branches. Bank of Charleston Malden, Kanawha. Bank of Berkeley, Martinsburg. Branch of Bank of the Old Dominion at Pearisburg. Bank of Phillippi, Phillippi. Barbour county. Bank of Winchester, Winchester. Fairmont Bank, Fairmont. The notes of the foregoing Banks are bought by the brokers of this city at 1½@2 per ct. discount. Virginia Bank notes that are at twenty-five per cent. Discount. The notes of the following Banks are at 25 per cent. discount: Bank of Manassas, Front Royal. Bank of Weston, Lewis county. Trans-Alleghany Bank of Jeffersonville, Tazewell. There are probably few, if any, of the notes of the last named Ba
List of Virginia Bank notes Unbankable in Richmond. Bank of the Valley and branches, save at Staunton and Christiansburg. Bank of Wheeling. Wheeling. Manufacturers' and Farmers' Bank of Wheeling and branches. Northwestern Bank of Virginia, Wheeling, and branches. Merchants' and Mechanics' Bank of Wheeling and branches. Bank of Charleston, Malden, Kanawha. Bank of Berkeley. Martinsburg. Branch of Bank of the Old Dominion at Pearisburg. Bank of Phillippi, Phillippi. Barbour county. Bank of Winchester. Winchester. Fairmont Bank, Fairmont. The notes of the foregoing Banks are bought by the brokers of this city at 1 per cent discount. Virginia Bank notes that are at Twenty-five per cent. Discount. The notes of the following Banks are at 25 per cent; discount: Bank of Manassas. Front Royal. Bank of Weston, Lewis county. Trans-Alleghany Bank of Jeffersonville, Tazewell. There are probably few. if any, of the notes of the last named Bank afloat,
t of Virginia Bank notes Unbankable in Richmond. Bank of the Valley and branches, save at Staunton and Christiansburg. Bank of Wheeling, Wheeling. Manufacturers' and Farmers' Bank of Wheeling and branches. Northwestern Bank of Virginia, Wheeling, and branches. Merchants' and Mechanics' Bank of Wheeling and branches. Bank of Charleston, Malden, Kanawha. Bank of Berkeley, Martinsburg. Branch of Bank of the Old Dominion at Pearisburg. Bank of Phillippi, Phillippi. Barbour county. Bank of Winchester, Winchester. Fairmont Bank, Fairmont. The notes of the foregoing Banks are bought by the brokers of this city at 1 per ct. discount. Virginia Bank notes that are at twenty-five per cent. Discount. The notes of the following Banks are at 25 per cent. discount: Bank of Manassas. Front Royal. Bank of Weston, Lewis county. Trans-Alleghany Bank of Jeffersonville, Tazewell. There are probably few, if any, of the notes of the last named Bank a
0 Protested Notes1,504.761,400.48 Interest due by James River Company219.00 Permanent Expenses1,140.001,140.00 Due from Banks and B'krs44,469.6776.08 Gold, Silver, &c10,092.479,441.46 Specie Funds, at agency5,082.3610,688.48 Checks and Cash Items32.16249.48 Virginia Bank Notes, (this Bank and others)2,777.001,991.00 Foreign Bank Notes625.00 $206,203.82$166,811.35 We, the undersigned Directors, have examined the above statement, and believe the same correct. L D. Morrall, Directors Samuel Woods, Directors. Jas. W. Haines, Directors. J. R. Williamson, Directors. Lewis Wilson, Directors. State of Virginia--Barbour County, to wit: This day. J. W. Payne, Cashier of the Bank of Philippi, personally appeared before me, J. N. B. Crim, a Justice of the Peace in and for said county, and made oath to the correctness of the above statement to the best of his knowledge and belief. Given under my hand this 1st day of January, 1861. J. N. B. Crim, J. P.
Scouting in Barbour County. A correspondent of the Lewisburg Chronicle, writing from Camp Garrett, Barbour county, Va., June 20, gives an interesting account of scouting expeditions in that neighborhood. It appears that Capt. Moorman, with twenty of his command, went close to the enemy's camp on the night of the 18th, and met with some exciting adventures. Says he letter: We passed the enemy's scouts all along the road, but they had not even the courage to fire upon us from the roadside, though they were concealed by the darkness and the bushes, which were as thick as the hairs on a dog's back. We come back in a walk, after firing a salute of twenty guns immediately by the towardly devils. On the next day, the 19th, squads of four of our company took possession of the pike, within four miles of Phillippi, and waited patiently, in ambush, for the enemy's scouts and spies. Calvin Renick. Cyrus Creigh, Chas. McClung, Lewis Peyton and Addison Bell composed the advanced gu
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