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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 19: observations upon matters connected with the War. (search)
ed that the States in rebellion should be divided into territories held under military control for a sufficient length of time to teach them that the lost cause and the lost Confederation was utterly obliterated and to be forgotten. I advised that those territories should be given specific names. For instance, Virginia should be the territory of Potomac; North Carolina, the territory of Cape Fear; South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, the territory of Jackson; Louisiana, the territory of Jefferson; Texas, the territory of Houston, and Arkansas, the territory of Lincoln. I believed that the lines of those territories should be so drawn as to cut up the boundaries of the original-States so that there should be nothing of State pride left. By their proceedings the people of these States had forfeited all honorable mention, and when they should be fit to come back into the Union,--which they would have been at an early day,--they should come in with the boundaries and names given, and
k the next morning, when they were awakened, and as soon as it was daylight, we were on our way. We arrived at Decatur at half-past 6 o'clock A. M., bringing back every member of my regiment that went with us. I wish to say a word relative to the condition of these people. They are mostly poor, though many of them are, or rather have been, in good circumstances. They outnumber nearly three to one the secessionists in portions of Morgan, Blount, Winston, Marion, Walker, Fayette and Jefferson counties; but situated as they are, surrounded by a most relentless foe, mostly unarmed and destitute of ammunition, they are persecuted in every conceivable way, yet up to this time most of them have kept out of the way sufficiently to avoid being dragged off by the gangs that infest the country for the purpose of plunder and enforcing the provisions of the rebel conscription act, but their horses and cattle are driven off in vast numbers. Every public road is patrolled by guerrilla bands, an
t's corps, embracing Anderson's, Jones's, Kemper's, Whitney's, and Evans's divisions, are located in the woods back of Waterloo Bridge; thinks Hill's division at Jefferson, Jackson's corps somewhere above Longstreet's. He appears truthful, and I credit his story. The entire district from Jefferson to Culpeper, Sperryville, and as on our arrival to be in good order, and strongly defended by the enemy. While we were taking position on the north side, the enemy began to break up his camp at Jefferson, and to mass his troops on the south side of the bridge. By noon, twenty-eight regiments of infantry, six batteries, and several regiments of cavalry of the enest have exploded several thousand rounds, and in all, so well sheltered were we, our killed did not reach twenty. That evening Jackson's whole force moved up to Jefferson, in Culpeper County, Longstreet close to him. The enemy was completely deceived, and concluded that we had given the thing up. Now comes the great wonder. St
t's corps, embracing Anderson's, Jones's, Kemper's, Whitney's, and Evans's divisions, are located in the woods back of Waterloo Bridge; thinks Hill's division at Jefferson, Jackson's corps somewhere above Longstreet's. He appears truthful, and I credit his story. The entire district from Jefferson to Culpeper, Sperryville, and as on our arrival to be in good order, and strongly defended by the enemy. While we were taking position on the north side, the enemy began to break up his camp at Jefferson, and to mass his troops on the south side of the bridge. By noon, twenty-eight regiments of infantry, six batteries, and several regiments of cavalry of the enest have exploded several thousand rounds, and in all, so well sheltered were we, our killed did not reach twenty. That evening Jackson's whole force moved up to Jefferson, in Culpeper County, Longstreet close to him. The enemy was completely deceived, and concluded that we had given the thing up. Now comes the great wonder. St
was formerly the headquarters of General Banks's division. Here the First Maryland, First Vermont, First Michigan, First Virginia, and Fifth New-York regiments of cavalry were consolidated into one brigade of cavalry, under the command of Brig.-General J. P. Hatch. Accompanied by one battery of six pieces and one regiment of infantry, the brigade advanced on Saturday, the twelfth instant, to Culpeper Court-House. They met the enemy in various places, dispersed about the neighborhood of Jefferson and other small towns and villages. During the various skirmishes on this advance several of our men were wounded, and one of the First Vermont cavalry killed. In all, eleven secesh soldiers were taken prisoners, and sent to Warrenton. On the arrival at Culpeper Court-House it was found that the cars had left a short time before with two hundred secesh soldiers. Scouting parties were immediately despatched in different directions to find the enemy. Major James M. Deems was sent with
ankee lieutenant. Didn't the Yanks dread him and his men more than they did the regular rebel cavalry? How did they (the prisoners) like his style of fighting? and a hundred such remarks, that indicated the man as being more of a braggart than a hero. He was, in the mean time, engaged in gathering his men with the avowed intention of attacking Captain Gere's force at daylight, and, if possible, of cutting it to pieces. His followers live in the farm-houses of Loudon, Clarke, and Jefferson counties, and are either rebel soldiers or Union citizens, as the case may require. He would ride up to a house, call Joe or Jake, and tell them that he wanted them at such an hour at the usual place; to go and tell Jim or Mose. Almost every farm turned out somebody in answer to his call, proving that these men, with the certified oath of. allegiance in their pockets, and with passes allowing them to come in and go out of our lines at will, are not only in sympathy with the enemy, but are the
e we commenced tearing up the track of the Georgia Central Railroad. We tore up about half a mile, and then were sent out as pickets for the brigade, after which we returned to Tennille, where we encamped for the night. November 27.--Marched eighteen miles east, to Davisboro, Station No. 12, Georgia Central Railroad. Crossed Williamson Swamp Creek. November 28.--Marched eleven miles east, to Spiers Station No. 11, tearing up and destroying about half a mile of track. Passed into Jefferson County. November 29.--Marched eight miles east, to Bostwick, tearing up and destroying about half a mile of track, also destroyed a large lumber yard of bridge timber; thence one mile to camp. November 30.--Marched eight miles north-west to near Louisville; crossed Ogeechee River, and encamped three miles south-east of the town of Louisville. December 1.--Marched thirteen miles east to near Janes's Mill Creek, crossing Dug Spring, Baker's and Camp Creeks, passed into Burke County.
, with the main portion of Robertson's brigade, except the Seventh Virginia cavalry, (Jones's,) and Lee's brigade, except the Third Virginia cavalry--say about fifteen hundred men, and two pieces of artillery. Proceeding through the village of Jefferson, part of the command crossed the Rappahannock at Waterloo bridge, and the remainder at Hart's Mill, a few miles below, and took the direct road to Warrenton. Reaching that place in the afternoon, I halted to close up and obtain information. N leave my small division in the immediate presence of a very strong force of the enemy, and, while it would be engaged in destroying the aqueduct, in a most exposed and dangerous position. I therefore determined to rejoin General Lee by way of Jefferson and Middletown, as previously instructed by him. Before marching, however, I received instructions to cross the Potomac at Cheek's Ford and proceed toward Harper's Ferry, and cooperate with Major-Generals Jackson and McLaws in the capture of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General J. E. B. Stuart of cavalry operations on First Maryland campaign, from August 30th to September 18th, 1862. (search)
. The enemy's account, subsequently published, admits the repulse of their force and the capture of the gun. After this repulse the enemy made no further efforts to annoy our rear. The brigade retired slowly, bringing off the prisoners captured, and bivouacked that night at Middletown--Lieutenant-Colonel Martin having been left with his command and two pieces of artillery to hold the Catoctin mountain. Munford was in the meanwhile ordered to occupy the gap in this range near the town of Jefferson. The force under his command consisted at this time of only the Second and Twelfth Virginia cavalry--the Sixth Virginia having been left at Centreville to collect arms, etc., the Seventeenth battalion detached before crossing the Potomac on an expedition into Berkely, and the Seventh Virginia cavalry having been ordered a day or two before to report to General Jackson for operations against Harper's Ferry. Every means was taken to ascertain what the nature of the enemy's movement was, wh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General I. R. Trimble's report of operations of his brigade from 14th to 29th of August, 1862. (search)
n, which being attacked by the enemy who had crossed the Rappanannock, I had an engagement of two hours with a superior force, and drove it across the river with great slaughter. General Hood's brigade coming up, relieved me, but took no part in the action. See my report of this battle to Lieutenant-General Jackson by his order. August 23d Marched to near Warrenton Springs. August 24th Remained stationary. Heavy artillery engagement with the enemy. In the evening marched to Jefferson and bivouacked. August 25th Marched up the river, crossed and halted at Salem — distance, thirty miles. August 26th Marched to Bristoe--twenty-seven miles. Trains attacked. At 10 P. M. General Jackson sent me word, if I thought proper, I could attack Manassas Junction that night. Set out to do it with two regiments of near five hundred men in all. Made the attack about 12 M., captured two batteries of four pieces each with all their horses and equipments, over three hundred p
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