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the Pontotoc road, and encamped for the night on the plantation of Mr. Sloan; the Second Iowa also moved south from their point of crossing, and encamped about four miles south of the river. The rain fell in torrents all night. The next morning, April nineteenth, I sent a detachment eastward to communicate with Colonel Hatch, and make a demonstration toward Chesterville, where a regiment of cavalry was organizing. I also sent an expedition to New-Albany, and another north-west toward King's Bridge, to attack and destroy a portion of a regiment of cavalry organizing there, under Major Chalmers. I thus sought to create the impression that the object of our advance was to break up these parties. The expedition eastward communicated with Colonel Hatch, who was still moving south parallel to us. The one to New-Albany came upon two hundred rebels near the town and engaged them, killing and wounding several. The one north-west found that Major Chalmers's command, hearing of our close
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 8: the siege and capture of Fort Donelson. (search)
o obstructions were so apparently insurmountable as to deter these messengers of good. They endured all that the army endured-perils, fatigues, and privations. The mail was nearly always in advance of the armies, or moving in a direction to meet them, and yet Colonel Markland never lost one, by capture, over which he had personal control. When Sherman reached tide-water, after his march for the sea, the mail for his army was in readiness for distribution; and the first vessel to reach King's Bridge, on the Ogeechee River, was the mail steamer. Subsequently, when Sherman marched through the Carolinas, and after the hard-fought battle of Bentonville, he met the mail for his army on the evening of the day of that battle. Letter to the author by General Markland, August 20, 1866. In a letter to Colonel Markland, written in May, 1865, General O. O. Howard says: For more than a year the Army of the Tennessee has been campaigning in the interior of the Southern States, a great portio
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 15: Sherman's March to the sea.--Thomas's campaign in Middle Tennessee.--events in East Tennessee. (search)
d Kilpatrick to cross the Ogeechee on a pontoon bridge, reconnoiter Fort McAllister, that commanded it below the railway, and proceeding to Sunbury, open communication with the fleet. Howard had already sent a scout (Captain Duncan) in a canoe down the Ogeechee for the same purpose. Finally, on the 13th, December, 1864. Sherman ordered General Hazen to carry Fort McAllister by assault with his second division of the Fifteenth Corps. That active officer at once crossed the Ogeechee at King's Bridge, and by one o'clock on that day his force was deployed in front of Fort McAllister, a strong inclosed redoubt, garrisoned by two hundred men, under Major Anderson, artillery and infantry, and having one mortar and twenty-three guns en barbette. At about this time Sherman and Howard reached Cheves's rice-mill, used as a signal station, where, for two days the officer in charge had been looking anxiously in the direction of Ossabaw Sound, for a Government steamer. Hazen and Fort McAlli
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), May 2-9, 1862.-expedition from Trenton to Paris and Dresden, Tenn., with skirmish, May 5, near Lockridge's Mill. (search)
am A. Haw and Henning von Minden, Fifth Iowa Cavalry. No. 1.-report of Col. Thomas Claiborne, Sixth Confederate Cavalry. Spring Creek, Tenn., May 9, 1862. Sir: I have the honor to report that I left Trenton on May 2 and encamped at King's Bridge. On the 3d encamped at McKenzie's Station, waiting Jackson, who joined me on the 4th, and we marched (whole force about 1,250) to attack a force reported to be at Paris, 250 to 500 strong. I separated into three columns, to surround it and reported force of 150. At a certain point he obtained some news that the enemy, near 1,000 strong, had encamped at dark 6 miles from Paris, and that they would be joined in the morning by 500 more. I moved at once to cross the Obion before King's Bridge could be seized. (It was the only one.) I encamped last night at McLemoresville, and satisfied myself that the enemy had that morning entered Paris with artillery, foot, and horse, but there he would remain. I left Colonel Pell at or n
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 22 (search)
ard to send a division with all his engineers to King's Bridge, fourteen and a half miles southwest from Savanbove the city, and the right on the Ogeechee, at King's Bridge. The army is in splendid order, and equal to anupplies from Port Royal to Cheeves's Mill, or to King's Bridge above, whence they could be hauled by wagons to once put to work to prepare a wharf and depot at King's Bridge, and the roads leading thereto were corduroyed ihe 16th many steamboats had passed up as high as King's Bridge; among them one which General Grant had dispatcht Savannah. Seagoing vessels can easily come to King's Bridge, a point on Ogeechee River, fourteen and a half t done yet. We find only six feet of water up to King's Bridge at low tide, about ten feet up to the rice-mill, one or two of my personal staff, I rode back to King's Bridge, leaving with Generals Howard and Slocum orders Red Legs, and hastened up the Ogeechee River to King's Bridge, whence I rode to my camp that same night. I th
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 23 (search)
ossession of all property pertaining to his department captured from the enemy, and cause the same to be collected and conveyed to points of security; all the heavy coast-guns will be dismounted and carried to Fort Pulaski. 4. The troops, for the present, will be grouped about the city of Savannah, looking to convenience of camps; General Slocum taking from the Savannah River around to the seven-mile post on the canal, and General Howard thence to the sea; General Kilpatrick will hold King's Bridge until Fort McAllister is dismantled, and the troops withdrawn from the south side of the Ogeechee, when he will take post about Anderson's plantation, on the plank-road, and picket all the roads leading from the north and west. 5. General Howard will keep a small guard at Forts Rosedale, Beaulieu, Wimberley, Thunderbolt, and Bonaventura, and he will cause that shore and Skidaway Island to be examined very closely, with a view to finding many and convenient points for the embarkation o
, just below the mouth of the Camochee, known as King's Bridge. This was reconstructed in an incredibly short er of thirty-pounder Parrott guns having reached King's Bridge, I proceeded in person to the headquarters of Mareak the Gulf Railroad, and secure, if possible, King's Bridge, over the Ogeechee, about a mile above the railry in force at the junction of this road with the King's Bridge and Savannah road. General Osterhaus effected aee, and halted about eight miles from the city. King's Bridge had been burned by the rebels. All the enemy's rse's division, followed by General Hazen on the King's Bridge road, the central column, consisting of General Reese, Chief-Engineer, was instructed to rebuild King's Bridge, which was effected by the morning of the thirteected to hold his division in readiness to cross King's Bridge the moment it was completed, and take Fort McAlln the coast. Until now, our depot had been at King's Bridge, where the army had built a good wharf, and cord
bank of the Ogeechee, which were to force a crossing of the Cannoucher, and sent forward sufficient force to break the Gulf Railroad, and secure, if possible, King's Bridge, over the Ogeechee, about a mile above the railroad, also to reconnoitre with one division between the Ogeechee rivers. The movement on the right bank led; Ge, I found practicable for a pontoon-bridge. General Corse sent forward a reconnoissance which found the enemy in force at the junction of this road with the King's Bridge and Savannah road. General Osterhaus effected a crossing of the Cannoucher with a couple of brigades, as directed. The Seventeenth corps meanwhile moved upve miles from Savannah, sent a detachment which broke the Gulf Railroad. His advance crossed the Little Ogeechee, and halted about eight miles from the city. King's Bridge had been burned by the rebels. All the enemy's force was withdrawn from Osterhaus's front in the morning, except the independent garrison at Fort McAllister,
h. General Osterhaus with the right column, consisting of General Corse's division, followed by General Hazen on the King's Bridge road, the central column, consisting of General John E. Smith's division, followed by General Woods, and the left, Ge the fleet, the Engineer Department under direction of Captain C. B. Reese, Chief-Engineer, was instructed to rebuild King's Bridge, which was effected by the morning of the thirteenth. The work was a remarkable one, being completed in about two to assault the works. General Hazen, of the Fifteenth corps, was directed to hold his division in readiness to cross King's Bridge the moment it was completed, and take Fort McAllister. General Kilpatrick made his reconnoissance on the twelfth, s in all the works on my front, in town, and at the different forts on the coast. Until now, our depot had been at King's Bridge, where the army had built a good wharf, and corduroyed the main road thereto from our front, for the most of the way.
dquarters Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry, near King's Bridge, December 18, 1864. Captain James Beggs, Aion, military division of the Mississippi, King's Bridge, Ga., December 21, 1864. Captain James Beghe regiment from Waynesboro to this point (King's Bridge) is devoid of special interest, and I do nmilitary division of the Mississippi, near King's Bridge, Ga., December 24, 1864. Captain: In co M., and encamped three (3) miles south of King's Bridge. 14th. Marched to Midway, and encamped. 15th and 16th. Moved to King's Bridge, and encamped, where this report was called for. Durvices. The regiment is now in camp near King's Bridge, Georgia. The various reports in detailCorps. Colonel Hamilton's Report. King's Bridge, Georgia, December 23, 1864. Colonel: Iheadquarters Tenth Ohio volunteer cavalry, King's Bridge, near Savannah, Georgia, December 22, 1864utenant and Acting Adjutant. Station, near King's Bridge, Ga. Date, December 23, 1864. Captain [12 more...]
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