Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for King's Bridge (Alabama, United States) or search for King's Bridge (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fortifications. (search)
in the committee of the whole, the opening a negotiation, in order to accommodate the unhappy disputes existing between Great Britain and the colonies, and that this be made a part of the petition to the King. But more determined spirits prevailed, and a compromise was reached late in May (25th), when directions were given to the Provincial Congress at New York to preserve the communications between that city and the country by fortifying posts at the upper end of Manhattan Island, near King's Bridge, and on each side of the Hudson River, on the Highlands. They were also directed to establish a fort at Lake George and sustain the position at Ticonderoga, on Lake Champlain, which the Green Mountain boys (q. v.) and others had seized a fortnight before. The first bill for the fortification of American harbors was reported in Congress, March 4, 1794, by a committee of one from each State, while the bill for the construction of a navy was under consideration. The act authorized the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), King's Bridge, (search)
King's Bridge, Spanning Spuyten Duyvil Creek, New York City, was first erected in the year 1691, and called the King's bridge. An unsuccessful attempt was made by Washington to cut off a force of the British at this place on the night of July 2, 1781. See New York City. King's Bridge in 1860. King's Bridge, Spanning Spuyten Duyvil Creek, New York City, was first erected in the year 1691, and called the King's bridge. An unsuccessful attempt was made by Washington to cut off a force of the British at this place on the night of July 2, 1781. See New York City. King's Bridge in 1860.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McAllister, Fort, capture of (search)
McAllister, Fort, capture of As Sherman's army, marching from Atlanta to the sea, approached Savannah, they found Fort McAllister, at the mouth of the Ogeechee River, a bar to free communication with the ocean, and on Dec. 13, 1864, General Hazen was ordered to carry it by assault. With a division of the 15th Corps Hazen crossed the Ogeechee at King's Bridge, and at 1 P. M. that day his force was in front of the fort—a strong enclosed redoubt, garrisoned by 200 men under Major Anderson. Sherman and Howard repaired to a signal-station where, with glasses, they could see the movements against the fort. Hazen's bugles sounded and the division moved to the assault. A little before a National steamer appeared below the fort, to communicate with the National army, but her commander was not sure whether Fort McAllister was still in the hands of the Confederates. All doubt was soon removed. Hazen's charging troops, after a brief but desperate struggle, fighting hand-to-hand over
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washington, Fort, capture of (search)
Washington, Fort, capture of On the day of the battle of White Plains in 1776, General Knyphausen, with six German regiments, crossed the Harlem River and encamped on the flat below Fort Washington and King's Bridge. That fort was a strong work, supported by outlying redoubts. It was on the highest point of land on Manhattan Island. When Washington heard of the peril that menaced it, he advised General Greene, in whose charge both it and Fort Lee, on the top of the palisades on the westved up from the flats along the rough hills nearest the Hudson. At the same time Lord Percy led a division of English and German troops to attack the lines on the south. General Mathews, supported by Lord Cornwallis, crossed the Harlem near King's Bridge, with guards, light infantry, and grenadiers; while Colonel Sterling, with Highlanders, crossed at a point a little above the present High Bridge. The outworks of the fort were defended on the north by Colonel Rawlings, with Maryland rifleme