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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Your search returned 21 results in 9 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
and 22, St. Clair's DefeatNov. 4, 1791 Fort St. ClairNov. 6, 1792 Near Fort St. ClairOct. 17, 1793 Fort RecoveryJune 30, 1794 Maumee Rapids (Fallen Timber)Aug. 20, 1794 TippecanoeNov. 7, 1811 War of 1812-15. Fort MackinawJuly 17, 1812 BrownstownAug. 4, 1812 MaguagaAug. 9, 1812 Chicago (Massacre at)Aug. 16, 1812 Detroit (Surrendered)Aug. 16, 1812 Fort HarrisonSept. 4 and 5, Fort MadisonSept. 4-6, 1812 GananoquiSept. 21, 1812 Queenstown HeightsOct. 13, 1812 St. RegisOct. 23, 181and 22, St. Clair's DefeatNov. 4, 1791 Fort St. ClairNov. 6, 1792 Near Fort St. ClairOct. 17, 1793 Fort RecoveryJune 30, 1794 Maumee Rapids (Fallen Timber)Aug. 20, 1794 TippecanoeNov. 7, 1811 War of 1812-15. Fort MackinawJuly 17, 1812 BrownstownAug. 4, 1812 MaguagaAug. 9, 1812 Chicago (Massacre at)Aug. 16, 1812 Detroit (Surrendered)Aug. 16, 1812 Fort HarrisonSept. 4 and 5, Fort MadisonSept. 4-6, 1812 GananoquiSept. 21, 1812 Queenstown HeightsOct. 13, 1812 St. RegisOct. 23, 181
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brownstown, Mich., battle at. (search)
Brownstown, Mich., battle at. See Van Horne, Thomas B.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maguaga, battle of. (search)
ptain Snelling, of the 4th Regiment. The infantry moved in two columns, about 200 yards apart. The cavalry kept the road in the centre, in double file; the artillery followed, and flank guards of riflemen marched at proper distances. In the Oak Woods, at Maguaga, near the banks of the Detroit, they received from an ambush of British and Indians, under Major Muir and Tecumseh, a terrible volley. This was a detachment sent over from Fort Malden by General Proctor to repeat the tragedy at Brownstown, cut off the communication between the Raisin and Detroit, and capture Brush and his stores. Snelling, in the advance, returned the fire and maintained his position until Miller came up with the main body. These were instantly formed in battle order, and, with a shout, the gallant young commander and his men fell upon the foe. At the same time, a 6-pounder poured in a storm of grape-shot that made sad havoc. The battle soon became general, when, closely pressed in front and rear, the Br
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Miller, James 1776-1851 (search)
Miller, James 1776-1851 Military officer; born in Peterboro, N. H., April 25, 1776; entered the army as major in 1808, and was lieutenant-colonel and leader of the Americans in the battle at Brownstown in 1812. He was distinguished in events on the James Miller. Niagara frontier, especially in the battle at Niagara Falls, or Lundy's Lane, in July, 1814. For his services there he was brevetted brigadier-general, and received from Congress a gold medal. He was governor of Arkansas from 1819 to 1825, and collector of the port of Salem from 1825 to 1849. He died in Temple, N. H., July 7, 1851.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Van Horne, Thomas B. (search)
August, 1812, Governor Meigs sent Captain Brush with men, cattle, provisions, and a mail for Hull's army. At the Raisin River, Brush sent word to Hull that he had information that a body of Indians under Tecumseh was lying in wait for him near Brownstown, at the mouth of the Huron River, 25 miles below Detroit, and he asked the general to send down a detachment of soldiers as an escort. Hull ordered Major Van Home, of Colonel Findlay's regiment, with 200 men, to join Brush, and escort him and The major crossed the Detroit from Hull's forces in Canada, Aug. 4. On the morning of the Thomas B. Van Horne. 5th, while the detachment was moving cautiously, Van Horne was told by a Frenchman that several hundred Indians lay in ambush near Brownstown. Accustomed to alarmists, he did not believe the story, and pushed forward his men in two columns, when they were fired upon from both sides by Indians concealed in the thickets and woods. The attack was sudden, sharp, and deadly, and the tr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), War of 1812, (search)
teers (of which there remained forty or fifty at sea when peace was proclaimed), and omitting those recaptured, was reckoned at 1,750. There were captured or destroyed by British ships 42 American national vessels (including 22 gunboats), 133 privateers, and 511 merchant-vessels—in all 686, manned by 18,000 seamen. Chronology. The following is a record of the chief battles and naval engagements between the United States forces and the combined British and Indian forces: Action at Brownstown, Mich.......Aug. 5, 1812 Action at Maguaga, 14 miles below Detroit......Aug. 9, 1812 Surrender of Fort Dearborn and massacre (Chicago)......Aug. 15, 1812 Surrender of Detroit by Gen. William Hull (Michigan))......Aug. 16, 1812 Frigate Constitution captures British frigate Guerriere ......Aug. 19, 1812 Defence of Fort Harrison, Indiana, Capt. Zachary Taylor commanding......Sept. 4, 1812 Battle of Queenston......Oct. 13, 1812 Sloop-of-war Wasp captures British sloop Frol
rginia & Tennessee Railroad May 10. Princeton May 11-15-16 and 17. Wolf Creek May 15. At Flat Top Mountain till August. Blue Stone August 13-14. Movement to Washington, D. C., August 15-24. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battles of Frederick City, Md., September 12. South Mountain September 14. Antietam September 16-17. March to Clear Springs October 8, thence to Hancock October 9. March to the Kanawha Valley, West Va., October 14-November 17. Duty at Brownstown November 17, 1862, to January 8, 1863. Scout to Boone, Wyoming and Logan Counties December 1-10, 1862. Moved to Buckhannon January 8, 1863, thence to Clarksburg April 26-27, and to Weston May 9-12. Moved to New Creek June 17, thence to Beverly July 2-7, and duty there till November 1. Averill's Raid from Beverly against Lewisburg and the Virginia & Tennessee Railroad November 1-17. Mill Point November 5. Droop Mountain November 6. Elk Mountain near Hillsborough Novembe
uri infantry. David Wendell Yandell, Louisville, Ky., surgeon appointed by the President, October 20, 1861. J. A. Denson, Georgetown, Tex., assistant surgeon Taylor's Nineteenth Texas infantry. December, 1864, board sitting at Washington, Ark.: Leonidas C. Ferrell, Homer, La., surgeon Capers' Fifth Louisiana cavalry. Nicholas Spring, Fort Smith, Ark., (not a graduate), surgeon hospital duty. William R. Wilkes, Springfield, Mo., surgeon hospital at Washington, Ark. James N. Morgan, Brownstown, Ark., surgeon Newton's Arkansas cavalry. Army Medical Board, P. O. Hooper, William M. Lawrence, Joseph T. Scott (George W. Lawrence, resigned), sitting January, 1865, at Marshall, Tex.: William A. C. Sayle, Lewisburg, Ark., surgeon Hill's Arkansas cavalry. Joseph A. McIrwin, Clinton, Mo., assistant surgeon Mitchell's Eighth Missouri infantry. T. M. Colley, Mt. Enterprise, Tex., surgeon First Creek cavalry. February, 1865, Marshall, Tex.: John S. Compton, Alexandria, La. (two cours
ession. Lannigan made the following statement: I was born in Ireland, in the county of Tipperary. I am twenty-three years old; have a mother and seven brothers; no father or sisters living. My mother lives with two of my brothers, near Syracuse. N. Y. Their names are Patrick and David Donovan. My other brothers are named Michael, who is at work in Danville, Pa., Thomas, at Scranton, Luzerne county, Pa., Thomas, at Scranton, Luzerne county, Pa., William, near Pittsburg, Pa., in Brownstown, Allegheny county; Richard, who is in the Fifth United States Artillery, Battery A. stationed at Washington; James, who lives in England, and is a miner in the north part of that island. My brother Patrick, and the youngest one, David, are with my mother at Syracuse. As I have said, I have helped to support my mother from my wages, while at work at the rolling mills and while in the army. Cause for shooting Major Lewis. I had no motive for shooting the Major. I blame the Capt