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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 35 5 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 8 4 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 4 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 23, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 17, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 20, 1860., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Stonington (Connecticut, United States) or search for Stonington (Connecticut, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 11 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
tony CreekJune 6, 1813 Hampton (Defence of)June 13, 1813 Craney IslandJune 22, 1813 Beaver DamsJune 23, 1813 Near Fort GeorgeJuly 8, 1813 Black RockJuly 11, 1813 Fort George (Defence of Outworks)July 17, 1813 Fort StephensonAug. 2, 1813 Stonington (Bombardment of)Aug. 9-11, 1813 Fort MimsAug. 30, 1813 ThamesOct. 5 1813 French CreekNov. 1 and 2, TallasehatcheNov. 3, 1813 TalladegaNov. 9, 1813 Chrysler's FieldNov. 11, 1813 Hillabee TownNov. 18, 1813 AuttoseNov. 29, 1813 Fort Niagtony CreekJune 6, 1813 Hampton (Defence of)June 13, 1813 Craney IslandJune 22, 1813 Beaver DamsJune 23, 1813 Near Fort GeorgeJuly 8, 1813 Black RockJuly 11, 1813 Fort George (Defence of Outworks)July 17, 1813 Fort StephensonAug. 2, 1813 Stonington (Bombardment of)Aug. 9-11, 1813 Fort MimsAug. 30, 1813 ThamesOct. 5 1813 French CreekNov. 1 and 2, TallasehatcheNov. 3, 1813 TalladegaNov. 9, 1813 Chrysler's FieldNov. 11, 1813 Hillabee TownNov. 18, 1813 AuttoseNov. 29, 1813 Fort Niag
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Custom-house, (search)
Custom-house, The place where commercial shipping is reported on its arrival from a foreign port, and receives its clearance papers on departure; also where foreign goods, liable to duty, are inspected on their arrival. The following is the location of the principal customhouses in the United States: Alabama—Mobile. Alaska—Sitka. California—Eureka, San Diego, San Francisco, Wilmington. Colorado—Denver. Connecticut—Fairfield, Hartford, New Haven, New London, Stonington. Delaware—Wilmington. District of Columbia—Georgetown. Florida—Appalachicola, Cedar Keys, Fernandina, Jacksonville, Key West, Pensacola, St. Augustine, Tampa. Georgia—Atlanta, Brunswick, St. Mary's, Savannah. Illinois—Chicago, Galena. Indiana—Evansville, Indianapolis, Michigan City. Iowa—Burlington. Dubuque. Kentucky—Louisville, Paducah. Loulsiana—Brashear, New Orleans. Maine—Bangor, Bath, Belfast, Castine, Eastport, Ellsworth, Houlton, Kennebunk,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Denison, Frederic, 1819- (search)
Denison, Frederic, 1819- Clergyman; born in Stonington, Conn., Sept. 28, 1819; graduated at Brown College in 1847; ordained to the Baptist ministry; chaplain of the 3d Rhode Island Heavy Artillery for three years in the Civil War. His publications include History of the 1st Rhode Island cavalry; Westerly and its witnesses for 250 years; History of the 3d Rhode Island heavy artillery Regiment; Picturesque Rhode Island, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hinman, Elisha 1734-1807 (search)
Hinman, Elisha 1734-1807 Naval officer; born in Stonington, Conn., March 9, 1734; went to sea at the age of fourteen years, and was a captain at nineteen, sailing to Europe and the Indies. He entered the navy of the Revolution, under Hopkins, in 1776, and was one of the first captains appointed by Congress. He was a very active officer. Captured when in command of the Alfred, thirty-two guns, he was taken to England, whence he escaped to France, and cruised successfully after his returolution, under Hopkins, in 1776, and was one of the first captains appointed by Congress. He was a very active officer. Captured when in command of the Alfred, thirty-two guns, he was taken to England, whence he escaped to France, and cruised successfully after his return, in 1779-80. President Adams offered him the command of the Constitution in 1798, but on account of his age he declined. From that time until 1802 he was engaged in the revenue service. He died in Stonington, Aug. 29, 1807.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stonington, bombardment of (search)
Stonington, bombardment of On Aug. 9, 1814, Sir Thomas Hardy appeared off Stonington, Conn., with a squadron consisting of the Ramillies,Stonington, Conn., with a squadron consisting of the Ramillies, seventy-four guns (flag-ship); Pactolus, forty-four guns; bomb-ship Terror; brig Despatch, twenty-two guns; and barges and launches. He ancoast-towns and ravage the country. The depth of the water before Stonington would not allow the flag-ship to approach nearer the town than a ng to destroy the unoffending inhabitants residing in the town of Stonington, one hour is granted them, from the receipt of this, to remove ou doing serious damage. During that bombardment some brave men in Stonington cast up a sort of redoubt on the extremity of the peninsula on which the city now stands, and placed upon it a Stonington flag. battery of two cannon—a 6-pounder and an 18-pounder — and from these they hurer consorts withdrew to the larger vessels. Some men gathered at Stonington the next day, but they were of little service; but a few from Mys
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trumbull, James Hammond 1821-1897 (search)
Trumbull, James Hammond 1821-1897 Philologist; born in Stonington, Conn., Dec. 20, 1821; educated at Yale College; settled in Hartford in 1847, and held political offices till 1864; librarian of the Watkinson library of reference in Hartford in 1863-91. He was the author of The colonial records of Connecticut (3 volumes); Historical notes on some provisions of the Connecticut statutes; The defence of Stonington against a British squadron, August, 1814; Historical notes on the Constitutirecords of Connecticut (3 volumes); Historical notes on some provisions of the Connecticut statutes; The defence of Stonington against a British squadron, August, 1814; Historical notes on the Constitution of Connecticut; Notes on forty Algonquin versions of the Lord's prayer; The Blue laws of Connecticut and the false Blue laws invented by the Rev. Samuel Peters; Indian names of places in and on the borders of the Connecticut, with interpretations, etc. He died in Hartford, Conn., Aug. 5, 1897.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
les......Dec. 2-16, 1839 Robert M. T. Hunter, of Virginia, Whig, elected speaker of the House on the eleventh ballot, receiving 119 votes out of 232. Whig National Convention at Harrisburg, Pa.......Dec. 4, 1839 [First ballot, Clay, 103; Harrison, 94; and Scott, 57. Fifth ballot, Clay, 90; Harrison, 148; and Scott, 16. The nomination of Harrison was made unanimous, and John Tyler nominated for Vice-President.] Steamer Lexington burned on Long Island Sound, between New York and Stonington, 140 lives lost......Jan. 13, 1840 Lieut. Charles Wilkes discovers the antarctic continent, 66° 20′ S. lat., 154° 18′ E. long......Jan. 19, 1840 [He coasted westward along this land 70 degrees.] Washingtonian Temperance Society founded in Baltimore......1840 Democratic National Convention at Baltimore, Md. Martin Van Buren nominated for President, leaving the States to nominate for Vice-President......May 5, 1840 Sub-treasury or independent treasury bill passed and approved<
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Connecticut, (search)
ecticut sells to the Connecticut Land Company, of 320 citizens, 3,200,000 acres, the remainder of the tract between Lake Erie and lat. 41° N..1795 [The price, $1,200,000, was made a State school fund.] Connecticut through Governor Trumbull, executes surrender to the United States of jurisdiction over the Western Reserve, Ohio......May 30, 1800 Connecticut opposed to war of......1812 New London blockaded by Sir Thomas Hardy with British ships for twenty months......June, 1813 Stonington bombarded by Sir Thomas Hardy's fleet......Aug. 9-12, 1814 Delegates from the several New England legislatures meet in convention at Hartford to consider the grievances caused by the war, and to devise measures for its termination......Dec. 15, 1814 Connecticut adopts a State constitution in place of the royal charter, by a vote of 13,918 to 12,361......Oct. 5, 1818 Washington College (Episcopal) chartered at Hartford......1823 [Name changed to Trinity, 1845.] Wesleyan Unive
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Rhode Island, (search)
r, of yellow fever, on the United States schooner Nonesuch in the harbor of Port Spain, island of Trinidad; buried with military honors at Newport......Dec. 4, 1826 Act establishing public schools throughout the State......January, 1828 Race riot in Providence begins between sailors and negroes, military aid is called in and the riot act read......Sept. 21-24, 1831 City of Providence incorporated......Nov. 22, 1832 Company incorporated to construct a railroad from Providence to Stonington in 1832, and railroad building commenced......1835 Fort Adams in Newport Harbor, begun in 1824, is completed......1839 Convention of delegates elected by friends of extension of suffrage, without regard to the law regulating the right of voting, at Providence, Oct. 4, 1841, forms a people's constitution, and declares it adopted by a vote of the people......Dec. 27-29, 1841 Thomas W. Dorr elected governor under the people's constitution......April 18, 1842 Dorr government attem
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), War of 1812, (search)
ly 5, 1814 Battle of Lundy's Lane, or Bridgewater, Upper Canada......July 25, 1814 Congress appropriates $320,000 for one or more floating batteries, designed by Robert Fulton; one finished......July, 1814 [This was the first steam vessel of war built.] Expedition from Detroit against Fort Mackinaw fails......Aug. 4, 1814 British troops land at Pensacola, Fla.......Aug. 4, 1814 British troops, 5,000 strong, under General Drummond, invest Fort Erie......Aug. 4, 1814 Stonington, Conn., bombarded by the British fleet under Commodore Hardy......Aug. 9-12, 1814 British fleet, with 6,000 veterans from Wellington's army under General Ross, appears in Chesapeake Bay......Aug. 14, 1814 Midnight assault by the British on Fort Erie repulsed......Aug. 15, 1814 Battle of Bladensburg, the Capitol at Washington burned......Aug. 24, 1814 Nantucket Island stipulates with the British fleet to remain neutral......Aug. 31, 1814 Sloop-of-war Wasp sinks the British sloop
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