Your search returned 29 results in 11 document sections:

1 2
flower, and landed at Plymouth Rock, on that memorable 22d of December, 1620. The fourth in descent from Peter the pilgrim, was John Brown, born in 1728, who was captain of the West Simsbury (Connecticut) train-band, and in that capacity joined the Continental Army at New York in the Spring of 1776, and, after two months service, fell a victim to camp-fever, dying in a barn a few miles north of the city. His grandson, John Brown, of Osawatomie, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born in Torrington, Conn., May 9, 1800. On his mother's side, he was descended from Peter Miles, an emigrant from Holland, who settled at Bloomfield, Conn., about 1700; and his grandfather on this side, Gideon Mills, also served in the Revolutionary war, and attained the rank of lieutenant. When John was but five years old, his father migrated to Hudson, Ohio, where he died a few years since, aged eighty-seven. He was engaged, during the last war, in furnishing beef cattle to our forces on the northern fro
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brown, John, 1744- (search)
In August, 1776, he was made lieutenant-colonel, and, on the morning of Sept. 18, 1776, he surprised the outposts of Ticonderoga, set free 100 American prisoners, captured four companies of British regulars, a quantity of stores and cannon, and destroyed a number of boats and an armed sloop. He left the service because of his detestation of Benedict Arnold, but continued to act with the militia. He was killed by Indians in the Mohawk Valley, Oct. 19, 1780. abolitionist; born in Torrington, Conn., May 9, 1800; hanged in Charlestown, Va., Dec. 2, 1859; was a descendant of Peter Brown of the Mayflower. His grandfather was a soldier of the Revolution, and perished in that war. When John was five years of age, his father moved to Ohio; and in 1815-20 he worked at the trade of a tanner. He became a dealer in wool; visited Europe on business; and in 1855 he emigrated to Kansas, where, as an anti-slavery champion, he took an active part against the pro-slavery party, engaging in som
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Connecticut, (search)
9, 1891 P. T. Barnum, born 1810, dies at Bridgeport......April 7, 1891 Superior Court decides in favor of Governor Bulkeley......June 24, 1891 Both claimants to governorship agree to take the matter into the State Supreme Court......Oct. 1, 1891 Ex-Gov. Hobart B. Bigelow dies at New Haven......Oct. 12, 1891 In the suit of Morris, Democrat, v. Bulkeley, Republican, the Supreme Court holds Bulkeley to be governor......Jan. 5, 1892 Daniel Grant, one of the famous triplets of Torrington, dies, aged seventy-one years, his two brothers surviving......Oct. 5, 1892 Celebration of the 250th anniversary of the founding of Stamford......Oct. 16, 1892 Governor Morris recommends constitutional revision......March, 1893 Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom's cabin, dies at Hartford......July 1, 1896 President Dwight, of Yale, resigns his office......Nov. 17, 1898 Arthur T. Hadley elected president of Yale University......May 25, 1899 Sons of the Revolution
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wolcott, Oliver 1747-1797 (search)
Conn., Jan. 11, 1760; a son of the preceding; graduated at Yale College in 1778, and was a volunteer to repel the British and Hessian marauders on the Connecticut coast towns in 1779. He became a volunteer aide to his father, and was afterwards a commissary officer. Admitted to the bar in 1781, he was employed in the financial affairs of Connecticut; and in 1784 was appointed a commissioner to settle its accounts with the United States. He was comptroller of national accounts in 1788-89, auditor of the United States treasury front 1789 to 1791, comptroller from 1791 to 1795, and Secretary of the Treasury from 1795 to 1800, when he was appointed United States circuit judge. In 1802 he engaged in mercantile business in New York City, in which he continued until the breaking out of the War of 1812-15, when, with his son, he established an extensive manufactory of textile goods at Wolcottville, Conn. He was governor of Connecticut in 1818-27. He died in New York City, June 1, 1833.
erby--Captain, E. S. Kellogg; 1st Lieutenant, T. S. Gilbert; 2d Lieutenant, Geo. Ager. Company C, from Suffield--Captain, R. S. Burbank; 1st Lieutenant, W. S. Pomeroy; 2d Lieutenant, Wm. Soby. Company D, from New London--Captain, J. C. Dunford; 1st Lieutenant, G. B. Cook; 2d Lieutenant, T. J. Mills. Company E, from New Haven--Captain, Oscar Dennis; 1st Lieutenant, T. I. Rockwood; 2d Lieutenant, E. F. Hendricks. Company F, from New Haven--Captain, N. S. Hallenbeck; 1st Lieutenant, E. C. Dow; 2d Lieutenant, G. M. Harmon. Company G, from Middletown--Captain, R. G. Williams; 1st Lieutenant, E. W. Gibbons; 2d Lieutenant, E. C. Beman. Company H, from Middletown--Captain, C. C. Clark; 1st Lieutenant, John A. Turner; 2d Lieutenant, D. R. Hubbard. Company I, from Wolcottville--Captain, S. H. Perkins; 1st Lieutenant, A. F. Brooker; 2d Lieutenant, E. 11. Mix. Company K, from Hartford--Captain, D. W. Siprell; 1st Lieutenant, Oliver Burke; 2d Lieutenant, A. S. Dickinson.--N. Y. Tribune, June 12.
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
hild, married Owen Brown, the father of our hero. John Brown born. The town records of Torrington supply these dates: Owen Brown, now of Torrington, late of Simsbury, was married at SimsTorrington, late of Simsbury, was married at Simsbury, on the 11th day of February, A. D. 1793. Anna Ruth Brown, daughter of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born in the town of Norfolk, the 5th day of July, 1798. John Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born in Torrington, the 9th day of May, 1800. Salmon Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born on the 30th day of April, 1802. Oliver Owen Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was bornth day of October, A. D. 1804. John Brown, therefore, was born in the year 1800, at Torrington, Connecticut, where he lived, about a mile north-west of the meeting house, until the age of five, wg his moderate capacity; & still more moderate acquirements. John was born May 9th 1800, at Torrington, Litchfield Co, Connecticut; of poor but respectable parents: a defendant on the side of his f
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 1: the child and his ancestors. (search)
f whom Ruth, the eldest child, married Owen Brown, the father of our hero. John Brown born. The town records of Torrington supply these dates: Owen Brown, now of Torrington, late of Simsbury, was married at Simsbury, on the 11th day of Torrington, late of Simsbury, was married at Simsbury, on the 11th day of February, A. D. 1793. Anna Ruth Brown, daughter of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born in the town of Norfolk, the 5th day of July, 1798. John Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born in Torrington, the 9th day of May, 1800. Salmon Brown, sonTorrington, the 9th day of May, 1800. Salmon Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born on the 30th day of April, 1802. Oliver Owen Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born the 26th day of October, A. D. 1804. John Brown, therefore, was born in the year 1800, at Torrington, Connecticut, whereTorrington, Connecticut, where he lived, about a mile north-west of the meeting house, until the age of five, when his father emigrated to Hudson, Ohio; where, we are told, he became one of the principal pioneer settlers of that then new town, ever respected for his probity and
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 2: the father of the man. (search)
John. His story will be mainly a narration of follies and errors; which it is to be hoped you may avoid; but there is one thing connected with it, which will be calculated to encourage any young person to persevering effort: & that is the degree of success in accomplishing his objects which to a great extent marked the course of this boy throughout my entire acquaintance with him; notwithstanding his moderate capacity; & still more moderate acquirements. John was born May 9th 1800, at Torrington, Litchfield Co, Connecticut; of poor but respectable parents: a defendant on the side of his father of one of the company of the Mayflower who landed at Plymouth 1620. His mother was decended from a man who came at an early period to New England from Amsterdam, in Holland. Both his Father's & his Mother's Fathers served in the war of the revolution: His Father's Father; died in a barn at New York while in the service, in 1776. I cannot tell you of any thing in the first Four years of
421. Brooks, Charles Timothy, Rev. [1813-1883], 1.463. Brooks, Nathan, 2.287. Brooks, Peter Chardon [1767-1849], 1; 488. Brougham, Henry [1779-1868], on slavery, 1.211; on G. Thompson's A. S. services, 435, and oratory, 436; urges him to the law, 436. Brown, David Paul [b. 1795; d.——], dissuaded from colonization, 1.413; mobbed in N. Y., 447; introduces Thompson in Philadelphia, 2.2; speech at Penn. Hall, 214, 215. Brown, Goold [1791-1857], 1.287, 288. Brown, John [b. Torrington, Conn., May 9, 1800; d. Charlestown, Va., Dec. 2, 1859], 2.184.—Portrait in Webb's Life. Brown, Moses [b. Sept. 23, 738; d. Providence, R. I., Sept. 8, 1836], host of G., 1.286, 288. Brown, Nicholas, captain of Francis, 1.165; denounced by G., 1.166; kindness to slaves, 169, 195; witness in Todd's suit, 195, G.'s comments, 197. Brown, Sylvanus, 2.426. Brownson, Orestes Augustus, Rev. [1803-1876], thinks currency the main question, 2.246; odious to J. Q. Adams, 224. Buckingham, J<
Explosion of an unusual character. --A strange explosion took place at the Allen House, in Wolcottville, Connecticut, last week. Fires were being lighted in a fire-place attached to a chimney-flue through which the gas from a coal stove passes, and at once a loud explosion occurred, and the chimney was completely torn apart from the garret to the ground. An accumulation of gas in the flue from the coal- stove is the only accountable cause of the explosion.
1 2