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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 19, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
sion, Terry's Provisional Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to March, 1865. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 10th Army Corps, Army of the Ohio, Dept. of North Carolina, to June, 1865. Service. Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., and at Tennallytown till April, 1863. Ordered to Suffolk, Va., April 16. Siege of Suffolk April 20-May 4. Providence Church Road, Nansemond River, May 3. Dix's Peninsula Campaign June 24-July 7. Expedition from White House to South Anna River July rganza till July 3. Moved to New Orleans, La., thence to Fortress Monroe, Va., and to Bermuda Hundred, Va., July 3-22. In trenches at Bermuda Hundred, Va., till July 28. Deep Bottom July 28-29. Moved to Washington, D. C., thence to Tennallytown July 31-August 2. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Battle of Winchester September 19. Fisher's Hill September 22. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Duty at Kernstown and Winchester till January, 1865.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
inia, to July, 1865. Service. Camp at Tennallytown, Md., till October, 1861, and at Camp Pierpto Darnestown, Md., August 28; thence to Tennallytown, Md., September 25 and join McCall. Attach Moved to Washington, D. C., thence to Tennallytown, Md. Attached to 2nd Brigade, McCall's Peninia, to June, 1864. Service. Duty at Tennallytown, Md., till Oct. 9, 1861, and at Camp Pierpoomac, to June, 1864. Service. Duty at Tennallytown, Md., July 27 to October 10, 1861, and at Comac, to June, 1864. Service. Duty at Tennallytown, Md., August 2 to October 10, 1861, and at tomac, to May, 1864. Service. Duty at Tennallytown, Md., August 2 to October 10, 1861, and at e Potomac, to June, 1864. Service. At Tennallytown, Md., August 1 to October 10, 1861, and at orps, to June, 1864. Service. Duty at Tennallytown, Md., and picket at Great Falls August 2 to Moved to Washington, D. C.; thence to Tennallytown, Md., August 10-13. Attached to 3rd Brigad[10 more...]
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Rhode Island Volunteers. (search)
hree months service. Moved to Washington, D. C., May 27-29, 1862. Attached to Whipple's Command, Military District of Washington. Duty at Camp Frieze, Tennallytown, till June 23. At Cloud's Mills till June 30, and near Fort Pennsylvania till August. Mustered out August 30, 1862. 1st Rhode Island Regiment Infantry Rhode Island Regiment Infantry. Organized at Providence May 26, 1862. Moved to Washington, D. C., by Detachments, May 27 and 29. Duty at Camp Frieze, Tennallytown, till July. Moved to Fairfax Seminary, Va., July 1. Garrison duty in the Defenses of Washington till September. Company A at Fort Greble, B at Fort Mence May 26, 1862. Moved to Washington, D. C., May 27-29. Attached to Samuel D. Sturgis' Command, Military District of Washington. Duty at Camp Frieze, Tennallytown, till June 26. Assigned to garrison duty in the Defenses of Washington. Company A at Fort Franklin, B and K at Fort Pennsylvania, C at Fort Cameron, D at F
John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment, Chapter 6: battles of Fairfax Court house, Flint Hill and Antietam. (search)
nty years of age and doubted my ability to control these men, but I commanded the company for nearly two years, and punished but one man during the time. That boy has since become known and honored by every comrade in Massachusetts. The friendship formed that day for George H. Patch continued until his death, and the memory of that light-hearted, true soldier will be precious to me while life shall last. Leaving the transports at Alexandria, we first marched to Chain Bridge, then to Tenallytown, Md. No one seemed to know where they wanted us. We went into camp and waited for orders, which, when received, were to march at once for Centreville, to reinforce General Pope. At daybreak, August 30, we crossed the bridge at Georgetown, and reached Fairfax Court House the next morning, having marched sixty-three miles in sixty-four successive hours. It was the hardest march we had made,--twenty-four hours of the time it rained in torrents. The shoes of the men were in bad condition;
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 16: the march down the Peninsula. (search)
ear Fort Ethan Allen, which the men had an opportunity to inspect. Dana's Brigade, Col. Hinks commanding, was ordered at noon of that day, however, to march to Tenallytown, ten miles distant. Men fell by the way from fatigue and hunger, for since leaving Harrison's Landing they had received only one ration other than coffee and hys Retreat, the men of the Nineteenth were a rough looking lot. The contrast between them and the neatly dressed, spick and span three-months men in garrison at Tenallytown was great. As the Nineteenth stopped at this town, one of the ninetyday men asked Who's that fellow? pointing to Lieut. James G. C. Dodge, of Company F, who ugh customer to meet in the woods alone. (Those who knew Lieut. Dodge's 5 feet 3 inches best will appreciate this remark most.) The command had just reached Tenallytown when orders were received to join Dana's Brigade at Centreville immediately and assist Gen. Pope. This meant another long march, but the men were in such an ex
........................................... 146 Symonds, George B.,................................................. 329 Symonds, George B.,................................................. 45 Taft, B. F.,.......................................................... 197 Taneytown, Md.,................................................... 224, 255 Teadley, Daniel,.................................................. 107, 108 Teele, George E.,............................................. 203 Tenallytown,......................................................... 122 Tenth Mass. Battery,............................................. 227, 360 Thoroughfare Gap, Va.,........................................213, 215, 289 Thorndike, Albert,.....................................45, 141, 146, 152, 163 Thomas, George P.,................................................. 208 Thomas, Terrance.................................................322, 228 Thompson, Edward C...........................
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 2: Harper's Ferry and Maryland Heights—Darnstown, Maryland.--Muddy Branch and Seneca Creek on the Potomac—Winter quarters at Frederick, Md. (search)
g; soldiers who did not enlist to fight, but to brag; men without discipline, not caring a rush for their officers. Their blood was not aroused, for they did not believe us to be really at war with a merciless and resolved rebel force; so they walked on tiptoe where should have been a ringing tramp. Against such a condition of things, it was urged, McClellan will provide; he is fortifying himself at Washington, on the west at Alexandria, and on the north, within eighteen miles of us, at Tennallytown; he will not leave Washington defenceless. On the nineteenth of October five of our friends from Boston dined with us at the headquarters' mess-table,--Messrs. Sidney Bartlett, William Amory and son, Jefferson Coolidge, and F. D'Hauteville. The dinner we gave them is, I am told, still fragrant in their memory. If I had informed our sympathizing and pitying friends at home of the four chickens happily roasted, of the tenderly boiled leg of mutton and its rich surroundings of butter s
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, chapter 14 (search)
ricksburg. Carroll's brigade 84173420338091* Warrenton, Va. Bayard's cavalry brigade 75129814981806* Warrenton, Va. Detachments 10236263411 Warrenton, Va. 6th New York cavalry Barnett's Ford,Va 1st Rhode Island cavalry 24506611790Junction O. & A. R. R. Pontoniers (3d Maine battery´╝ë5127140146Opposite Fredericksbnrg. Signal party6142023 Warrenton, Va. Total Third Corps 116122756266073069052 Reserve (Sturgis's) Corps: Headquarters staff and escort10394950 Alexandria, Va. Whipple's Division 332556864236868477Defences of Washington. Cook's brigade5810711227136816Cloud's Mill. 68th Illinois 80677814933Cloud's Mill. 71st New York Militia36477552570Tennallytown. Fort Washington, Md 510712112361 Total Reserve Corps 471793992269912554 Detached commands: White's brigade 13126212958357415 Winchester, Va. District of Kanawha (Cox's)3968416950211680*Charleston Flat Top Total detached 627110371246015254Mountain and Meadow Grand total 3506684687777997900 Bluff, W. Va.
lsworth before he would raise the Union colors, and as John was not at home, it would seem that some one had kindly planted the flag for him. We crossed Cameron Run, and marched across the country at though making for Arlington Heights; but when in sight of Fort Albany we moved east, along the line of the Alexandria and Loudon Railroad, struck the Washington road, and crossed Long Bridge into the capital. We moved through the city of magnificent distances, over Georgetown Heights to Tennallytown. How many times and on how many different errands, did we, during our career as an element either of the Army of the Potomac or of the Army of the Shenandoah, pass through or rest at this little village? The turnpike gate on the west side is one of the landmarks figured in memory. It was now evident that there was or was about to be an invasion of Maryland. Our course the next day led us through Rockville, in the midst of a thrifty agricultural region in harvest time, when the fruit
ixth Corps sent to Washington affair at the Monocacy Fort Stevens pursuit of Early up Loudon Valley and through Snicker's Gap military execution return to Tenallytown marches and countermarches up the Valley Sheridan in the Valley The march through the bottom lands of the Chickahominy, and over the fields of Charles Citmdrum life that was evidently led by the men of this garrison. In less than an hour, the bugle said, Drivers, mount! and following our leaders we proceeded to Tenallytown in Maryland. But transports were positively waiting off Washington to convey the Sixth Corps to the James. Indeed, our return from the Blue Ridge was in acct injunctions to be always within call. Nevertheless, a good representation of each command might have been found in the city on any day during this tarry at Tenallytown. Even in the Capitol, venturesome privates were seen inspecting the paintings, and alas! too many others, victims of the venders of bad whiskey, who would lat
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