Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Fernandina, Fla. (Florida, United States) or search for Fernandina, Fla. (Florida, United States) in all documents.

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Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: the Port Royal expedition. (search)
on, however, with General T. W. Sherman, whose orders, dated August 2, 1861, are as follows: You will proceed to New York immediately, and organize, in connection with Captain Dupont, of the navy, an expedition of 12,000 men. Its destination you and the naval commander will determine after you have sailed. The confidential order of October 12th, to the flag-officer, says: In examining the various points upon the coast, it has been ascertained that Bull's Bay, St. Helena, Port Royal, and Fernandina are each and all accessible and desirable points for the purposes indicated, and the Government has decided to take possession of at least two of them. Which of the two shall thus be occupied will be committed to your discretion after obtaining the best information you can in regard to them. . . . Notwithstanding the violence of the gale, it was ascertained that only one vessel attached to the naval force, the steam transport Governor, had been lost, and that all save seven of the per
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: strategic Reconnoissances. (search)
en previously sent to Savannah, and those at Fernandina were in process of removal when the expeditiremained in Warsaw Sound until they left for Fernandina. For some time the flag-officer had beenentered by St. Andrew's, and off the town of Fernandina. At that time the greater number of the gune guns that protected the direct entrance to Fernandina. A defence was therefore deemed impracticabh remained, and Commander Rogers returned to Fernandina in the other launch. In the defences surrounding Fernandina only thirteen guns were found, one 120-pounder and one 80-pounder, both rifled. tured Port Royal, but the enemy had given as Fernandina. Brigadier-General H. G. Wright came intoless so. The army was now in occupancy of Fernandina,, and vessels despatched in the performance h, now the flag-ship, left her anchorage off Fernandina, accompanied by a bevy of gunboats, and anchhad been deserted. The operations against Fernandina led to the abandonment of the entire coast l[12 more...]
et seq. Ellis, the, 184, 194 et seq., 198 Emerson, Captain S., 119 Empire City, U. S. transport, 49 Eolus, the, 229 Ericsson, Captain, John, 110 et seq., 114 Escort, the, 197 Evans, Ensign, 237 F. Fagan, Lieutenant, 233 Fairfax, Commander D. M., 92, 125, 128, 162 (note) Fanny, the, U. S tug, 165, 169, 172, 184, et seq. Farragut, Rear-Admiral, 215 et seq. Faunce, Captain, John, 165 Febiger, Commander, 204, 209 (note) Fellows, Colonel, 63 Fernandina, Fla., 48 et seq. Fingal, the, 120 Fisher, Signal Officer, 178 Fisher, Fort, see Fort Fisher. Flag, the, U. S. steamer, 81 Flusser, Lieutenant-Commanding C. W., 177, 184 189, 194, 199 et seq. Foote, Admiral, 122 Forrest, the, Confederate steamer, 185 Fort Beauregard, 22, 27; abandoned, 28 et seq., 101 Fort Clinch, desertion of, 50 et seq. Fort Donelson, the, 229 Fort Fisher, 217, 219 et seq. Fort Jackson, the, 218, 228 Fort McAllister, 85 et seq.