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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 14 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 12 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 10 2 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
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the Mint! The story of our disgrace is a long and painful one to me, but remembering your kindness in fully informing us of the progress of events in Virginia, it is but right I return the compliment; though my narrative may be wanting in many particulars which history, at some distant future, can alone be expected to unfold. When the bombardment of Fort Sumter proved that the South was determined to rid her soil of the enemy, troops were also sent to Pensacola, seized Fort McRea, Barrancas, and Warrenton, and laid siege to the enemy's fortifications (Fort Pickens) on Santa Rosa Island. Our forces there began to increase very rapidly, and, under the command of General Bragg, were wrought up to a fine spirit of discipline and efficiency. Except the night surprise of the enemy on Santa Rosa, nothing of moment transpired, the respective forces being content to fortify their positions and otherwise remain inactive. Commodore Hollins, who was cruising in the Gulf when we declar
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., With Slemmer in Pensacola Harbor. (search)
t a mile and a half from it and two miles north-east of Fort McRee, stands Fort Barrancas, and, now forming a part of it, the little old Spanish fort, San Carlos de vy Yard, and seven miles farther up the bay is the town of Pensacola. Near Fort Barrancas, and between it and the Navy Yard, is the post of Barrancas Barracks, and t to resist was taken, by the removal of the powder from the Spanish fort to Fort Barrancas, where on the same night a guard was placed with loaded muskets. It was non the 15th Colonel W. H. Chase, commanding the enemy's forces at the yard and Barrancas, came over in a small boat with Captain Farrand (late of the United States na, having been set free from her moorings by the fire, drifted down opposite Fort Barrancas, where she sank. The Union loss was 3 men killed and 13 wounded. Lieutenany it was not executed. January 1st, 1862. Bombardment of Forts McRee and Barrancas by Union batteries. May 9th. Burning and evacuation of Pensacola. ed
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Chapter 2: Charleston Harbor. (search)
nder which the local insurrections of the Cotton States became an organized rebellion against the government of the Union. Nor was this the only advantage which the conspiracy had secured. Since the 12th of January a condition of things existed in the harbor of Pensacola, Fla., similar to that at Charleston. The insurgents had threatened, and the officer in charge had surrendered the Pensacola Navy Yard. Lieutenant Slemmer, of the army, with a little garrison of forty-six men, held Fort Barrancas. Finding he could not defend his post, nor Fort McRee, also on the mainland, he, with a loyal courage which will ever render his name illustrious, repeated the strategy of Anderson, and moved his slender command, augmented by thirty ordinary seamen from the navy yard, on the morning of January 10th, to Fort Pickens, a large and more defensible work standing at the harbor entrance, on the western end of Santa Rosa Island. The Government hurriedly sent a few ships of war to assist him, w
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Index. (search)
ate authorities, 61, 131, 135 Annapolis, 100, 102 et seq.; route by, to the capital, 106 et seq. Arkansas, 80, 121 Arlington Heights, Va., occupied by Union forces, 110; fortified, 169 Ashby's Gap, 168 B. Baker, Edward D., 76 Ball's Bluff, engagement at, 210 Baltimore, 83; attack on the Massachusetts soldiers in, 85 et seq., 98; authorities burn R. R. bridges, 89 Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, 141 Bates, Attorney-General, 122 Banks, General N. P., 208 Barrancas, Fort, 88 Beauregard, General G. T., 56; directs operations against Fort Sumter, 57, 59; placed in command at Manassas, 170; his first measures, 170, 171; his plan for the battle of Bull Run, 176 et seq.; composition of his army, 176, note Beckham, Lieut., 194 Bee, General, 185 Bell, adherents of, 8 Benham, Captain, 152 Beverly, 142, 146, 151 Black, Secretary, 26, 38 Blackburn's Ford, 176, note; engagement at, 178 Blair, Francis P., 109 Blair, Frank P., Jr., 116 et
erty is the soul of the nation. The speech is denounced by both extremes, and is understood by the Southerners to mean coercion, while the political friends of the Senator consider it a relinquishment of his principles.--Times, Jan. 13. Fort Barrancas and the navy yard at Pensacola, were seized. The late commandant of the navy yard, in a dispatch to Government, says: Armed bodies of Florida and Alabama troops appeared before the gate of the navy yard, and demanded possession. Having no means of resistance, I surrendered and hauled down my flag. They are now in possession. A dispatch to the Florida senators announced the same as follows: We repaired down here and captured Fort Barrancas and navy yard, and then paroled the officers, granting them permission to continue to occupy their quarters. We are now in possession. This move was in consequence of the Government garrisoning Fort Pickens, which has before remained unoccupied. You will propose to the Administ
of to-day says: we have conversed with a gentleman who has just returned from the camp at Pensacola and brings the latest intelligence. As details are not to be expected, we may state generally that the condition of the troops and fortifications is all that could be desired. Gen. Bragg has proved the very man for the work, and the volunteers lend a ready hand to carry out every order. Pickens is covered by our batteries on three sides. There are eight between the Navy-Yard and Fort Barrancas, four between the latter and the light-house, and a formidable mortar battery in the rear of Fort McRae. There is also a heavy mortar battery in the rear of Barrancas. All these works have been erected by the hands of the volunteers, and are armed with the very heaviest and best of artillery. The channel on a line between McRae and Pickens has been obstructed by sinking a number of small vessels. It was supposed that every thing would be complete by the middle of the coming week, aft
ews, where they shelled the camp of the Second Louisiana regiment, completely destroying it, and causing much havoc among the rebels.--(Doc. 184.) The Second regiment of cavalry N. Y. S. V., Black horse cavalry, under the command of Colonel A. J. Morrison, left Camp Strong, near Troy, for the seat of war. Previous to their departure the troops were presented with an elegant stand of colors. Col. Morrison is an officer of considerable military experience. He served in the Mexican war, in the expeditions of Lopez and Walker, and with Garibaldi in Italy. On his return to the United States he was authorized to raise a regiment of cavalry, which he has designated the Black horse cavalry, and which is now the second regiment of volunteer cavalry of New York. Fort Pickens opened fire upon the rebel steamer Time, just as she entered the Navy yard at Warrington, Fla., and was answered by the rebels at Forts Barrancas and McRae. The firing continued upon both sides nearly all day.
November 23. The bombardment of the rebel Forts McRae and Barrancas was continued from Fort Pickens and the National ships in Pensacola harbor. Fort McRae was completely silenced, and Barrancas and the Navy yard at Warrington very much damaged. The town of Warrington was destroyed, together with the rebel rifle works at that place. Fort Pickens sustained no damage beyond the disabling of one gun. The loss on the Union side was one killed and six wounded.--(Doc. 191.) Brig.-Gen. H.Barrancas and the Navy yard at Warrington very much damaged. The town of Warrington was destroyed, together with the rebel rifle works at that place. Fort Pickens sustained no damage beyond the disabling of one gun. The loss on the Union side was one killed and six wounded.--(Doc. 191.) Brig.-Gen. H. H. Lockwood, in command of the Union force on the eastern shore of Virginia, issued a proclamation, by which the various officers of the civil government in that locality were restored to the exercise of their functions interrupted by the ordinance of secession. This expedition accomplished important results without bloodshed. Ten pieces of cannon were captured, eight of them new and in good condition; also a thousand stand of arms, rebel flags, &c.--(Doc. 185.) The Confederate gunboa
nd Dispatch, January 3. The rebel batteries at Pensacola, Fla., having repeatedly fired at the national vessels, Fort Pickens opened on the rebel steamer Times, which was landing stores at the navy-yard today. The rebel batteries responded, and the firing was continued till evening, Fort Pickens firing the last shot. The rebel guns were well aimed, and most of their shells burst inside of the fort; only one man was wounded, however. A shot from Fort Pickens made a large breech in Fort Barrancas. In the evening the National guns set Warrington on fire.--(Doc. 1.) The Knoxville (Tenn.) Register of to-day expresses the opinion that Parson Brownlow's release was a great blunder, and gives the following reasons: In brief, Brownlow has preached at every church and school-house, and made stump-speeches at every cross-road, and knows every man, woman and child, and their fathers and grandfathers before them, in East-Tennessee. As a Methodist circuit-preacher, a political stump-s
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 7: Secession Conventions in six States. (search)
te. This consisted of Fort Jefferson, at the Garden Key, Tortugas; Fort Taylor, at Key West; Forts Pickens, McRee, and Barrancas, near the entrance to Pensacola Bay (a fine expanse of water at the mouth of the Escambia River), and the Navy Yard, atopposite, but a little farther seaward, on a low sand-spit, is Fort McRee. Across from Fort Pickens, on the main, is Fort Barrancas, built by the Spaniards, taken from them by General Jackson, and repaired by the National Government. Nearly a mile . Slemmer resolved to do what he might without his co-operation, and he at once took measures to secure the powder in Fort Barrancas, which he had been occupying. He caused the batteries to be put in working order, strengthened the guard, and, at suty of Florida. --Pensacola Observer, January 15, 1861. At the same time Colonel Lomax and some men took possession of Fort Barrancas, and restored the disabled guns; and another party was soon afterward thrown into Fort McRee. Farrand, Renshaw, Rand
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