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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 3, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 87.-the campaign in Florida. (search)
watering-place. A large sulphur-spring is in the vicinity, around which are bath-houses. The place also has three hotels, each of which is capable of accommodating two hundred guests. The principal hotel is hardly finished, and has never been used. None of the enemy were seen. The rebel Major Phillips had a camp of men near by not long since. The property brought away was marked Baldwin. The hospital transport Cosmopolitan on the following day went up the same river to a place called Picolata. The troops did not land. They heard of a large quantity of cotton and turpentine that was in the interior. The vessel was piloted by a negro. General Seymour's orders. headquarters District Florida, Jacksonville, Fla., February 17, 1864. General orders, no. 5. The Brigadier-General Commanding heartily congratulates his command on the brilliant success which has attended all their movements thus far into Florida. Three flags, eight guns, with caissons, battery-wagons, and
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 11.-St. John's River expedition. (search)
f Lieut.-Commander Breese. United States gunboat Ottawa, off Bay point, May 28, 1864. Sir: In compliance with your instructions of the twenty-second instant, I got under way in this vessel, with the Columbine in company, and proceeded to Picolata, where I had a consultation with General Gordon on the subject of the expedition. It was arranged that I should take two hundred and seventy troops on board this vessel and one hundred on board the Columbine, and proceed with them opposite to P Columbine would return, but heard nothing of her. At 11.10 A. M., on the twenty-fourth, anchored at Orange Mills, but found no troops; the General had embarked part of his men on board of the Houghton, and the remainder he had marched across to Picolata. It left me in an awkward position, as the vessel could not float across the flats. I received on board seven stragglers left behind at Pilatka and from Orange Mills, belonging to the One Hundred and Fourty-fourth and One Hundred and Fifty-sev
d two gunboats to accompany me, the Ottawa and little steam-tug Columbine. At Picolata I added to my force six (6) companies of Colonel Beecher's regiment, and all t opposite Pilatka. My movements had been slightly delayed by time expended at Picolata in filling sand bags (no cotton or hay bales, save one of the latter, being avconcentrate at camp, nine miles south of St. Augustine, at that place, and at Picolata. The two hundred of the One Hundred and Forty-fourth were ordered to return ts, and no transportation for any with me, I made my way back to the landing at Picolata, to take the steamer Houghton to Jacksonville. I reached the river on Tuesdayr. I deem it fortunate that I did not attempt to run farther up the river than Picolata with my troops. I will submit further facts in relation to the loss of the Coon embarked his troops in the Charles Houghton, and without delay proceeded to Picolata, where he put aboard the Ottawa and Columbine an additional force, and, togeth
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Connecticut Volunteers. (search)
Moved to Folly Island, S. C., and duty there, operating against Charleston, S. C., till February, 1864. Expedition to John's and James Islands February 6-14. Ordered to Jacksonville, Florida, February 22, and duty there till April 15. Moved to St. Augustine, Florida, April 15-17, and duty there till June, 1865. Action at Welaka May 19, 1864 (Detachment). Expedition to Camp Milton May 31-June 3. Action at Milton June 2. Whitesville July 24. Companies A, C, I and K at Picolata, St. Johns River, July 18, 1864, to February, 1865. Companies A, E, F and H moved to Jacksonville July 22, 1864, and participated in Expedition to Baldwin July 23-28. Expedition to Enterprise September 28, 1864. Companies C, F and H at Lake City, Florida, and G and I at Tallahatchie May and June, 1865. Regiment moved from St. Augustine to Jacksonville June 9, and duty there till July 7. Mustered out July 19, 1865. Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 48 Enlisted men
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States Colored Troops. (search)
District of Florida, Dept. of the South, to October, 1864. 4th Separate Brigade, Dept. of the South, to November, 1864. 1st Brigade, Cbast Division, Dept. of the South, to December, 1864. 2nd Brigade, Coast Division, Dept. of the South, to January, 1865. 4th Separate Brigade, District of Florida, Dept. of the South, and Dept. of Florida, to February, 1866. Service. Provost duty at Jacksonville, Florida, till March 30, 1864. Moved to Palatka, Florida, March 30-31, and to Picolata April 12. Ordered to Folly Island, S. C., April 13, thence to Morris Island, S. C., and duty there, operating against Charleston till May 20. Moved to St. Augustine, Florida, May 20, thence to Tybee Island, S. C., May 22. Expedition to Ashepoo River May 24-27. Action at Ashepoo River May 26. Moved to Hilton Head, S. C., June 30. Expedition to James Island, S. C., July 1-10. Near Winter's Point July 3. King's Creek July 3. Actions on James Island July 3 and 9-10.
A section of artillery, under Lieutenant Gamble, supported by infantry under Captain Grieve, First Georgia regulars, was sent to complete the wreck, and firing a few rounds at that portion above water, Captain Bryan with two men boarded her and set fire to her upper works. She proved to be the steamer Maple Leaf with the camp and garrison equipage of three regiments, recently arrived at Jacksonville and hurried up to Palatka. A few weeks later the transport Hunter, on a return trip from Picolata, having on board quartermaster supplies, was also destroyed by a torpedo near the wreck of the Maple Leaf. An aggressive movement being determined upon, General Finegan was directed to proceed by rail from Baldwin to Waldo with about 2,500 infantry and six pieces of artillery; thence by nearest route to Palatka, which place he was to attack and carry, after which he was to be governed by circumstances and await further orders. Between Waldo and Palatka he was to be joined by Colonel Mar
he St. John's river as far as Volusia county, were kept constantly engaged. Learning from his scouts on the east side of the river that the enemy's garrison at Picolata was about 400 strong and was becoming very troublesome and insulting to our loyal citizens in that neighborhood, Captain Dickison resolved on an expedition acrosght and until 10 o'clock the next morning making the passage over, but landed safely and in fine spirits. They had a long and circuitous route to march to reach Picolata, continuing until 2 o'clock that night. When within one mile of the fort a halt was called and a young soldier in the command, whose father lived inside the Fed the house he saw two officers, a major with his adjutant, riding off. He dashed up to them and demanded a surrender. These officers belonged to the garrison at Picolata. At the house, several soldiers, with 1 captain and 1 lieutenant, were captured. The detachment by the roadside captured the band of musicians, composed of 12
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
ps, Tenn.: Plan 111, 7 Philadelphia, Pa. 135-A; 136, B13; 171 Philadelphia, Tenn. 24, 3; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 142, E2; 149, A13 Philippi, W. Va. 84, 10; 116, 3; 135-A; 135-C, 1; 140, E12; 171 Philomont, Va. 7, 1, 100, 1 Piankatank River, Va. 16, 1; 100, 1; 137, E10 Camp Piatt, W. Va. 141, C9 Fort Pickens, Fla. 110, 1; 135-A; 147, F5; 171 Sketch 5, 6 Fort Pickering, Tenn.: Plan 114, 4 Pickett's Mills, Ga. 57, 1 Picolata, Fla. 135-A; 146, B10 Piedmont, Va. 94, 2; 100, 1 Piedmont W. Va. 82, 6; 84, 4; 135-A; 135-C, 1, 135-A; 135-C, 2; 136, E3 Pigeon Bayou, La. 156, D5 Pigeon Mountain, Ga. 24, 3 57, 1; 97, 1; 111, 9; 149, E10 Pig Point, Va. 18, 2; 26, 4; 137, G10 Fort Pike, La. 135-A; 156, D11; 171 Piketon, Ohio 140, F4; 141, A5; 171 Pikeville, N. C. 86, 16; 117, 1; 138, F7 Pile Bridge, James River, near Varina, Va.: Plan 76, 6 Fort Pillow, Te
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the naval war. (search)
for him at a turn in the river a little lower down; the Federal commander had foreseen this ambuscade, and passed the dangerous point without losing a single man. In the mean while, two gun-boats at the other extremity of the line of the coast, occupied by Dupont, were trying to remedy the bad effect produced by the evacuation of Jacksonville, by making their appearance every three or four days before that town; they even sailed up St. John's River several times, and proceeded as far as Picolata, on a line with St. Augustine. Each of the naval stations established in the principal bays along the coast organized expeditions similar to those of which North Edisto Sound and the entrance of St. John's River had been the point of departure. A foreign brig having run the blockade to reach Sapelo Sound, two of the gun-boats stationed at that point, the Wamsutta and the Potomska, followed her into Riceboroa River; they proceeded thirty miles up this river; but after steaming that dist
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
mour to fall back on the 12th from Sanderson to Baldwin, and to hold this post with might and main. This order was promptly executed without the Federals suffering any molestation at the hands of the enemy, and the bridge over the St. Mary's River destroyed. Henry with his cavalry pushed forward a reconnoissance along the Cedar Keys Railroad as far as Gainesville, where he dispersed a detachment, while several vessels, ascending the St. John's River, took possession of the small towns of Picolata and Palatka, situated on an arm of the sea. The co-operation of the fleet rendered the victualling and defence of these places an easy matter. Having thus assumed the occupation of the country which he proposed to guard, Gillmore embarked on the 13th for Hilton Head, after having directed Seymour to complete the occupation without any thought of extending it. But as soon as the chief was gone, Seymour, forgetting his wise instructions, determined to resume the campaign. Although his me
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