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World English Bible (ed. Rainbow Missions, Inc., Rainbow Missions, Inc.; revision of the American Standard Version of 1901) 4 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 29, 1865., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 17, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 2 0 Browse Search
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Genesis (ed. Rainbow Missions, Inc., Rainbow Missions, Inc.; revision of the American Standard Version of 1901), chapter 10 (search)
n their nations. To Shem, the father of all the children of Eber, the elder brother of Japheth, to him also were children born. The sons of Shem: Elam, Asshur, Arpachshad, Lud, and Aram. The sons of Aram: Uz, Hul, Gether, and Mash. Arpachshad became the father of Shelah. Shelah became the father of Eber. To Eber were born two sons. The name of the one was Peleg, for in his days was the earth divided. His brother's name was Joktan. Joktan became the father of Almodad, Sheleph, Hazarmaveth, Jerah, Hadoram, Uzal, Diklah, Obal, Abimael, Sheba, Ophir, Havilah, and Jobab. All these were the sons of Joktan. Their dwelling was from Mesha, as you go toward Sephar, the mountain of the east. These are the sons of Shem, after their families, after their languages, in their lands, after their nations. These are the families of the sons of Noah, after their generations, in their nations. Of these were the nations divided in the earth after the flood.
Genesis (ed. Rainbow Missions, Inc., Rainbow Missions, Inc.; revision of the American Standard Version of 1901), chapter 25 (search)
Abraham took another wife, and her name was Keturah. She bore him Zimran, Jokshan, Medan, Midian, Ishbak, and Shuah. Jokshan became the father of Sheba, and Dedan. The sons of Dedan were Asshurim, Letushim, and Leummim. The sons of Midian: Ephah, Epher, Hanoch, Abida, and Eldaah. All these were the children of Keturah. Abraham gave all that he had to Isaac, but to the sons of the concubines who Abraham had, Abraham gave gifts. He sent them away from Isaac his son, while he yet lived, eastward, to the east country. These are the days of the years of Abraham's life which he lived: one hundred seventy-five years. Abraham gave up the spirit, and died in a good old age, an old man, and full of years, and was gathered to his people. Isaac and Ishmael, his sons, buried him in the cave of Machpelah, in the field of Ephron, the son of Zohar the Hittite, which is before Mamre, the field which Abraham purchased of the children of Heth. There was Abraham buried, with
the lately disenthralled. Reck'n I is, sho‘ nuff. But does yo‘ say dat Ise good as missus?--my missus? Certainly you are! This with asperity. Den Ise jess gwine out yere, rite off! cried Clarissa Sophia, suiting action to word-Ef Ise good as my missus, I'se goin‘ ter quit; fur I jess know she ent ‘soshiatin‘ wid no sich wite trash like you is! And so — under all skies and among all colors — the war dragged its weary length out; amid sufferings and sacrifices, which may never be recorded; and which were still illumined by the flashes of unquenchable humor-God's tonic for the heart! Had every camp contained its Froissart-had every social circle held its Boswell-what a record would there be, for reading by generations yet unborn! But-when finished, as this cramped and quite unworthy chronicle of random recollections is-then might the reader still quote justly her of Sheba, exclaiming: And behold! the one-half of the greatness of thy wisdom was
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan's Trevilian raid. (search)
osed up on Hampton, was late in getting out that morning, and Custer, without knowing it, struck the road between them. When Lee attempted to close up he espied a wagon-train, caissons, etc. (Custer's), and obligingly took them under his protection. The spoil included all of Custer's captures (except two hundred prisoners), his headquarters wagon, and his colored cook, Eliza, who usually occupied an antique ruin of a family carriage on the march, and was called by the soldiers the Queen of Sheba. In one of the fluctuations of the fight that day the Queen escaped, and came into camp with her employer's valise, which she had managed to secure. While moving upon the rear of the First Brigade, Fitz Lee's men also espied one of Pennington's guns in a tempting spot; they drove away its slight support and captured the piece, but the limber and most of the artillerymen escaped. Upon reporting this loss, Pennington said he thought the enemy intended to keep it. I'll be d----d if they do
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and explorers, 1583-1763 (search)
posed and done at Harbor Grace in Britaniola, anciently called Newfound-land. The verses which fill its pages passed current with the similar output of his age. A number, and by no means the least rhythmical, were inspired by his associates on the western shores of the Atlantic. One of these is addressed To the right Honourable, Sir George Calvert, Knight, Baron of Baltimore, and Lord of Avalon in Britaniola, who came over to see his Land there, 1627 ; it compares Baltimore to the Queen of Sheba. The repayment of the drafts made upon the literature of the motherland was not long delayed. It is more than probable that Shakespeare found in the reports of some New World voyagers one of his most momentous inspirations. Hugh Peters and the younger Harry Vane were only two of the temporary Americans who returned to take a lively part in the pamphleteering conflicts of the Protectorate. Roger Williams divided his controversial activities equally between the old and New England, and h
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The lost arts (1838). (search)
this drop of liquid glass must have been poured, because there is no joint. This must have been done by a greater heat than the annealing process, because that process shows breaks. The imitation of gems has deceived not only the lay people, but the connoisseurs. Some of these imitations in later years have been discovered. The celebrated vase of the Genoa Cathedral was considered a solid emerald. The Roman-Catholic legend of it was, that it was one of the treasures that the Queen of Sheba gave to Solomon, and that it was the identical cup out of which the Saviour drank at the Last Supper. Columbus must have admired it; it was venerable in his day. It was death for anybody to touch it but a Catholic priest. And when Napoleon besieged Genoa,--I mean the great Napoleon, not the present little fellow,--it was offered by the Jews to loan the Senate three million dollars on that single article as security. Napoleon took it, and carried it to France, and gave it to the Institute.
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Standard and popular Library books, selected from the catalogue of Houghton, Mifflin and Co. (search)
dams. Familiar Letters of John Adams and his wife, Abigail Adams, during the Revolution. Crown 8vo, $2.00. Louis Agassiz. Methods of Study in Natural History. 16mo, $1.50. Geological Sketches. 16mo, $1.50. Geological Sketches. Second Series. 16mo, $1.50. A Journey in Brazil. Illustrated, 8vo, $5.00. Thomas Bailey Aldrich. Story of a Bad Boy. Illustrated. 16mo, $r.50. Marjorie Daw and Other People. 16mo, $1.50. Prudence Palfrey. 16mo, $1.50. The Queen of Sheba. 16mo, $1.50. The Stillwater Tragedy. $1.50. Cloth of Gold and Other Poems. 16mo, $r.50. Flower and Thorn. Later poems. 16mo, $1.25. Poems. Complete. Illustrated. 8vo, $5.00. American Men of Letters. Edited by Charles Dudley Warner. Washington Irving. By Charles Dudley Warner. 16mo, $1.25. Noah Webster. By Horace E. Scudder. 16mo, $1.25. Henry D. Thoreau. By Frank B. Sanborn. 16mo, $1.25. George Ripley. By 0. B. Frothingham. 16mo, $1.25. J. Fenimore Coope
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Narrative and legendary poems (search)
d off the chains he forged, The jail-bolts backward fell; And youth and hoary age came forth Like souls escaped from hell. 1877. King Solomon and the Ants. out from Jerusalem The king rode with his great War chiefs and lords of state, And Sheba's queen with them; Comely, but black withal, To whom, perchance, belongs That wondrous Song of songs, Sensuous and mystical, Whereto devout souls turn In fond, ecstatic dream, And through its earth-born theme The Love of loves discern. Proud he heard Its small folk, and their word He thus interpreted: “Here comes the king men greet As wise and good and just, To crush us in the dust Under his heedless feet.” The great king bowed his head, And saw the wide surprise Of the Queen of Sheba's eyes As he told her what they said. ‘O king!’ she whispered sweet, “Too happy fate have they Who perish in thy way Beneath thy gracious feet! “Thou of the God-lent crown, Shall these vile creatures dare Murmur against thee where The kn
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Margaret Smith's Journal (search)
not doubt this Newbury trouble was something very like it. Hereupon the good woman took the matter up, saying she had been over to Newbury, and had seen with her own eyes, and heard with her own ears; and that she could say of it as the Queen of Sheba did of Solomon's glory, The half had not been told her. She then went on to tell me of many marvellous and truly unaccountable things, so that I must needs think there is an invisible hand at work there. We reached Hampton about one hour befoth such testimony ought not to hang a cat, the widow being little more than a fool; and as for the fellow Gladding, he was no doubt in his cups, for he had often seen him in such a plight that he could not have told Goody Morse from the Queen of Sheba. June 8. The Morse woman having been found guilty by the Court of Assistants, she was brought out to the North Meeting, to hear the Thursday Lecture, yesterday, before having her sentence. The house was filled with people, they being curio
The Daily Dispatch: August 17, 1861., [Electronic resource], The Federal GeneralsWool for Butler. (search)
The Federal Generals — Wool for Butler. When the Queen of Sheba visited the great Oriental monarch, we read that she presented him with apes and peacocks, though it is not stated that they were designed for the chiefs of his "grand army." Since the Virginia races of Bethel and Manassas, the unlucky Federal Generals have been pitched out of the camp as unceremoniously as ever a litter of blind puppies were tumbled out of a bag into the horse-pond.--Under these circumstances a substitute was indispensable, and a venerable turkey cock is to supercede the "butler" sent in disgrace from Fortress Monroe. We doubt whether the world has ever seen a "grand army" headed by two such antiquated coxcombs as Fuss and Feathers and his rival, numbering one hundred and fifty years between them — equals in age, in vanity, and in mutual hatred. Of all the birds, the turkey is the most stupid; but he will fly at anything, even if ten times stronger than himself. So Gen. Magruder will have t
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