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Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war, Chapter 14: (search)
the river's edge, there to await the coming of the ferry-boat which had been built since all the bridges on the river had been burned by the hostile army. The scene seemed so unreal that like Abou Hassan, the caliph of fiction, I was thinking of biting my fingers to make sure I was really awake. Had I not had my coin in my hand to pay the ferryman, I should have imagined we were all shades, flitting about on the shore of the Styx! In musing silence, I could but say, O swift-flowing Chattahoochee, is it thus I behold thee? thou lowest in almost pristine loveliness. Where are your huge bridges, that linked the green hills of Alabama with the beautiful city of cottages and flowers? Where are the cotton mills and machine-shops that lined your banks, --mills which from early morn until the sun set sent forth an incessant hum? Is it thus that I behold thee, city of my fathers? My reverie was broken when the ferryboat reached her landing; but things all still seemed so strange
enever a man showed himself about the bridge, we plugged him. The fire got under good headway, and we slipped up that ditch and ran to our horses, mounted, and made our best speed to overtake our conmand. We caught up just as morning began to dawn. As soon as it was light we halted to feed; but before our horses were half done eating, the rebels were upon us again. Knowing the country better than we did, they had crossed the river at another place, and dashed on to cut us off from Chattahoochee. We tried to make a stand, but they outnumbered us, and flanked us, and we were forced to save ourselves by flight. We came into the neighborhood of Newman, and found that eight thousand infantry were there prepared to receive us. With these fresh troops before us and Wheeler's cavalry behind us, we found ourselves in a fix. But worn out as we and our horses were, we charged, and fought our way to the right, and would have reached the Chattahoochee if we could have found a road.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
Army, assumes command of the Army of the Tennessee. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan, U. S. Army, resumes command of the Fifteenth Army Corps. Maj. Gen. David S. Stanley, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard in command of the Fourth Army Corps. Brig. Gen. Alpheus S. Williams, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker in temporary command of the Twentieth Army Corps. July 27-31, 1864.McCook's raid on the Atlanta and West Point and Macon and Western Railroads, with skirmishes near Campbellton (28th), near Lovejoy's Station (29th), at Clear Creek (30th), and action near Newnan (30th). Garrard's raid to South River, with skirmishes at Snapfinger Creek (27th), Flat Rock Bridge and Lithonia (28th). July 27-Aug. 6, 1864.Stoneman's raid to Macon, with combats at Macon and Clinton (July 30), Hillsborough (July 30-31), Mulberry Creek and Jug Tavern (August 3). July 30, 1864.Maj. Gen. Henry W. Slocum, U. S. Army, assigned to the command of the Twentieth Army Corps. Aug. 7, 1864.Bri
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
ar Rivertown, where he laid a pontoon bridge with which he was provided, crossed his command and moved rapidly on Palmetto Station of the West Point Railroad, where he tore up a section of track, leaving a regiment to create a diversion toward Campbellton, which regiment fulfilled its duty and returned to camp by way of and escorting back the pontoon bridge train. General MeCook then rapidly moved to Fayetteville, where he found a large number of the wagons belonging to the rebel army in Atlanthe break. Bridges have been built with surprising rapidity, and the locomotive whistle was heard in our advanced camps almost before the echo of the skirmish fire had ceased. Some of these bridges — those of the Oostenaula, the Etowah, and Chattahoochee — are fine substantial structures. and were built in an inconceivably short time, almost out of material improvised on the spot. Col. W. W. Wright, who has charge of the construction and repairs, is not only a most skillful, but a wonder
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
gave Lieutenant Ludlow full instructions concerning the building of it. The position held by the Fifteenth Army Corps during the battle of the 28th of July was selected by Captain Reese as a flank to be occupied by the Army of the Tennessee upon the withdrawal of the Army of the Cumberland. General Kilpatrick's cavalry command returned, having passed entirely around Atlanta. August 24, at work upon the new flank referred to above. Reconnaissances pushed to the right almost as far as Campbellton. August 25, at midnight the grand movement commenced by the withdrawal of the Fourth and Twentieth Corps. The latter marched directly to the railroad bridge, Pace's and Turner's Ferries, while the former passing in rear of the Army of the Tennessee, bivouacked next night on Utoy Creek. Before the movement began its left had rested on the Decatur road. August 26, the movement of the Army of the Cumberland still going on, and at dark the left wing of the Army of the Tennessee was
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 48 (search)
he morning by order of Colonel Opdycke, division officer of the day. The position remained unchanged until July 3, on the night of which the enemy again evacuated his position, giving the Federal troops possession of Marietta. On July 5 I took part in pursuit of the rebels to within one mile of the Chattahoochee River, near which place we were put regularly in camp. July 9, my regiment with the other troops of the division moved to Roswell, fourteen miles above the railroad bridge over Chattahoochee, where we crossed to south side of same. On July 12, being relieved by the troops of General Dodge's command, moved back to the camp from which the march had been made on the 9th. Crossed to south side of the river on the 13th and joined the corps, which had crossed during the day previous, and erected works. On July 18 the advance toward Atlanta was begun, in which my regiment participated, moving on the Buck Head road. The day following we were moved forward to Peach Tree Creek,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 70 (search)
ing the regiment from the Fourth Division, Twentieth Army Corps, to the Second Brigade, Third Division, Fourth Army Corps, were received on the 14th day of August, 1864, at regimental headquarters at Decherd, Tenn. Owing to directions from Major-General Rousseau, the regiment was not allowed to move until the 23d. We were again detained, by orders from Major-General Steedman, at Dalton, Ga., from the 24th to the 28th. On the evening of the last-named day we arrived at Vining's Station (Chattahoochee), and finding that our corps had moved for the rear of Atlanta two days before, I immediately mobilized the regiment, and at 2 p. m. on the 29th we started, by the way of Sandtown, to join our command. After a careful and pleasant march we joined the Second Brigade, Third Division, Fourth Army Corps, on the morning of the 31st of August, near Rough and Ready, on the Macon railroad. We marched with the command, but had no part in any action until the 2d day of September. Finding the en
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 86 (search)
aken by this command in the campaign in Northern Georgia during the present summer: The battery left Blue Springs, Tenn., near Cleveland, on or about the 3d day of May last, marching with the First Division, Fourth Army Corps, to which it was attached. It took part in all the actions in which the First Division was engaged, being spiritedly engaged with the enemy at Tunnel Hill, Rocky Face Ridge, Dalton,. Resaca, Kingston, Dallas, Pine Mountain, Kenesaw Mountain, Ruff's; Station, Chattahoochee River, Peach, Tree Creek, and Atlanta. In the movements around and south of Atlanta, by which the enemy was, forced to evacuate the place, the battery was but little engaged, the section of 3-inch rifles, under command of Lieut. J. F. Ellison, doing all the firing that was done. As I am only temporarily in command, in consequence of Captain Morrison being wounded, I am unable to make this report more explicit. The records of the battery show the number of rounds of ammunition fired and t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 90 (search)
mmand of the late Capt. S. M. McDowell. Was attached to First Division, Fourth Army Corps, Department of the Cumberland. Has been engaged at Tunnel Hill, Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, Kingston, Cassville, New Hope Church, and Kenesaw Mountain, where Capt. S. M. McDowell was killed while performing his duty. Since then the battery was commanded by Capt. Jacob Ziegler, and has been engaged on the 4th of July, 1864, near Chattahoochee River, Ga.-Rebels evacuated the same night and we followed them up to Chattahoochee River, where we took position, crossed the river, and had several engagements, until we came up to front of Atlanta. Left the front of Atlanta on the 25th day of August, 1864, and marched toward the Macon railroad. The casualties during the campaign have been : Nominal list (omitted) shows 3 killed and 13 wounded. Horses killed and disabled, 22. J. Ziegler, Capt. Battery B, Independent Pennsylvania Vet. Vols. Capt. Lyman Bridges, Chief of Artillery, Fourth Army Corps.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 114 (search)
picketline, the whole being under a heavy fire until sunset. On the 5th marched at 6 a. m. in pursuit of the enemy on road running parallel with line of railroad; encamped about one and a half miles from the Chattahoochee River. On 8th of July moved to the right into position on the left of Davis' division. On the 16th the battalion was on picket duty on the river. On 17th, at 5 p. m., marched one and a half miles to the left as rear guard of division train to Pace's Ferry. Crossed Chattahoochee next day, and joined the brigade. On 20th crossed Peach Tree Creek, and about 4 p. m. threw up breast-works under a heavy fire from the rebel artillery, and about sunset was marched four miles to the left to fill a gap between Fourth and Twentieth Corps; was employed on picket duty at this point until the morning of the 22d of July, when the battalion was directed to join the division. The Fourteenth Corps having been detailed to pursue the enemy, marched to within two miles of Atlanta
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