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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 81 (search)
on the evening of the 14th. In the fighting at this place, our division being held in reserve, the regiment lost but I man wounded, on the 15th. On the 16th, the enemy having found it expedient to retire, we were again put in pursuit and engaged in occasional skirmishing, without any loss to us, until we came to Cassville, on the 19th, where we remained until the 23d, when we were again ordered to march, crossing the Etowah River and Allatoona Mountain. We next encountered the enemy near Dallas, where was fought the battle of New Hope Church, where, out of eight companies (two having been left behind on the skirmish line), the regiment lost I killed, 29 wounded, and 16 missing, including the commanding officer, Lieut. Col. G. A. Frambes, and Adjt. M. J. W. Holter. Night having terminated the fighting of this bloody afternoon, we retired to the right and rear of the scene of action, and rested until morning, when we were moved still farther to the right, confronting and skirmishin
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 82 (search)
-sixth Pennsylvania Battery were engaged with General Hardee's corps, C. S. Army. The corps camped near Cassville three days, at which place Lieut. George W. Freeman, inspector of artillery and ordnance officer, and acting chief of artillery, was relieved by reason of the expiration of his term of service, and I was appointed, by order of Major-General Howard, acting chief of artillery in the absence of Maj. T. W. Osborn, absent 31 R R-Vol XXXVIII, Pt I wounded. May 23, the corps moved to Dallas via Euharlee and Raccoon Creek and Pumpkin Vine Creek. May 26, the Sixth Ohio Light Battery and Fifth Indiana Light Battery and Battery A, First Ohio Light Artillery, were engaged in front of New Hope Church. May 27, all the batteries of the corps were placed upon the front main line of works, in the positions assigned and prepared for them by order of Major-General Howard, where they remained, changing positions with their divisions until June 6, when they marched to Morris' Hill Church, Ga
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 85 (search)
le. The line of march was again taken up at 12 m. of the 23d and proceeded without events of importance until 6 p. m. of the 26th instant, when it was ordered by corps chief of artillery from near Pumpkin Vine Creek to a commanding position near Dallas, behind works constructed by pioneers. Eighteen hundred yards in our front was a heavy line of rebel works in which were three batteries. With two of these we were fiercely engaged on the 27th instant. One of the rebel batteries was silenced, n service by virtue of term of enlistment about to expire, leaving the battery in command of junior First Lieut. Lyman A. White. On account of the heavy rain the roads were extremely muddy, which, with very short forage, made the march, from near Dallas to the position taken in front of Kenesaw Mountain, very wearing upon our animals. During the 17th and 18th the battery was actively engaged in several positions. The section commanded by Sergt. Luman C. Lawrence rendered most efficient service
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 86 (search)
have the honor to submit the following as a report of the part taken by this command in the campaign in Northern Georgia during the present summer: The battery left Blue Springs, Tenn., near Cleveland, on or about the 3d day of May last, marching with the First Division, Fourth Army Corps, to which it was attached. It took part in all the actions in which the First Division was engaged, being spiritedly engaged with the enemy at Tunnel Hill, Rocky Face Ridge, Dalton,. Resaca, Kingston, Dallas, Pine Mountain, Kenesaw Mountain, Ruff's; Station, Chattahoochee River, Peach, Tree Creek, and Atlanta. In the movements around and south of Atlanta, by which the enemy was, forced to evacuate the place, the battery was but little engaged, the section of 3-inch rifles, under command of Lieut. J. F. Ellison, doing all the firing that was done. As I am only temporarily in command, in consequence of Captain Morrison being wounded, I am unable to make this report more explicit. The records of
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 87 (search)
engagement. On the morning of May 16, the enemy having evacuated Resaca, I marched with the division, without being ordered into position, until the evening of the 17th, when I took position near Adairsville, but did no firing. I continued moving with the division the 18th and 19th, passing through Adairsville and Kingston, and went into camp on the 20th near Cassville, Ga., where I remained resting three days. I resumed the march with the division May 23, 24, and 25, moving toward Dallas, Ga. On the afternoon of May 2.6 I crossed Pumpkin Vine Creek and placed one section of my battery in position on the front line of General Wagner's brigade. This section was relieved on the afternoon of the 27th by a section of Battery M, First Illinois Artillery. At 11 p. m. of the same day my battery relieved Captain McDowell's (Pennsylvania) battery, which was posted with General Kimball's brigade within 150 yards of the enemy's works. I improved and strengthened the works in which my b
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 91 (search)
ision and held until the 24th. May 24.-The division moved via Van Wert to rejoin the corps. May 25.--Arrived near Dallas; the First and Third Divisions in the mean time had advanced with the army, and participated in the movements, following emy's retreat from Resaca to Lost Mountain. iMay 26.--The First Division moved to Burnt Hickory; Second Division moved to Dallas, and Third Division moved to Raccoon Ford. During the remainder of the month, from the 27th, the First Division was stationed at Pickett's Mills, and the Second Division at Dallas, skirmishing and fighting. May 28.--The Third Division moved to the forks of the Dallas and Van Wert roads, and returned on the 29th with wagon trains to Burnt Hickory, and remained tst Division at Pickett's Mills, where it remained in position until the 6th, skirmishing. The Second Division moved from Dallas to the left, and was in position until the 6th, skirmishing. The First Brigade, Third Division, left at Burnt Hickory.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 94 (search)
p. m., in the midst of a driving rainstorm, which lasted until 11 p. m., I went into bivouac on the Raccoon Creek. The 25th was spent in clearing the way for our trains by assisting the wagons of the Twentieth Corps over the difficult hills which border Raccoon Creek. By 10.30 o'clock that night all of my wagons were across and in park beyond my troops, toward Burnt Hickory. At 1 a. m. of the 26th I marched again, reaching Burnt Hickory before break of day. Two miles south of this, on the Dallas road; at 7 a. m., under instructions from Major-General Palmer, I halted in order to enable him to communicate with Major-General Thomas. At 11.30 a. m. we renewed the march, and early in the afternoon I formed my troops in rear of the Fourth Corps, about three miles east of Pumpkin Vine Creek, which we crossed by the bridge near Owen's Mill. On the 27th two brigades of my division participated in the assault upon the enemy's right, being in support to the division of Brigadier-General Wo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 96 (search)
crossed the Etowah River at Island Ford, and encamped for the night on Euharlee Creek near the Burnt Hickory road. May 24.-The brigade moved out on the Burnt Hickory road; crossing Raccoon Creek, it bivouacked for the night on the south side. May 25.-The brigade remained at this place during the day, while the train of the Twentieth Army Corps passed, and at 1 o'clock next morning, May 26, it marched on the Burnt Hickory road, through Burnt Hickory, to Brown's Mill, three miles from Dallas. May 27.-The command moved in two lines, supporting the Second and Third Brigades, to a point on Pumpkin Vine Creek near Pickett's Mills. At 11 p. m. the brigade was placed in two lines on the left of General King. Msay 28.-Early next morning the line was advanced about onequarter of a mile and the brigade was formed in single line extending from right to left along the ridge in front of Leverett's and Brand's houses. About 3 p. m. the First Wisconsin, (Third Brigade) was put in po
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 100 (search)
egiment was moved next day to the village of Resaca, where we bivouacked for the night. On the morning of the 17th we resumed our march after the retreating foe across the Oostenaula River, through Calhoun and Adairsville, reaching Kingston in the afternoon of the 19th, and bivouacked a few miles south of that point (after burning the saltpeter works) until the morning of the 23d, when the regiment stripped for battle, crossed the Etowah, and by easy marches reached the Allatoona hills near Dallas on the evening of the 26th. A portion of the Fourth Corps being hotly engaged on the 27th, the brigade was sent to its support, but night putting a stop to the fight, the regiment was not brought into action. Next morning the regiment took a position between the Eighty-eighth Indiana and Tenth Wisconsin on the extreme left of our lines, threw up some hasty works, and soon became engaged with the enemy's skirmishers. At this point Captain Waggener, brigade adjutant-general, was killed ear
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 102 (search)
2 p. m an assault upon the enemy's works was ordered. The line moved forward, but were not successful in reaching the enemy's works. Were fortunate in finding cover in a small ravine, where the command did some close shooting, which forced the enemy to keep under cover of his works until dark, when we withdrew; lost 13 men killed and 33 wounded. At 8 a. m., May 15, were placed in second line. The enemy evacuated on the night of the 15th; moved in pursuit on the 16th. Found the enemy near Dallas, May 26. Were placed in front and skirmished with the enemy until June 2. On the night of June 5 the enemy withdrew to Lost Mountain. We were not in the front until June 17. Near Kenesaw Mountain, June 21, 1 man wounded on skirmish line; 9 p. m., were placed in second line of works. June 22, artillery firing heavy; 1 commissioned officer and 6 men wounded by shell from. the enemy's guns. July 1, 1 man killed by rebel sharpshooter. During the night of July 2 the enemy evacuated his
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