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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 134 (search)
skin. May 25, left camp at 7.30 a. m. and marched slowly toward Dallas, Ga. Halted at 11.30 a. m. to get dinner; again in a forest of long-lched fifteen miles. It is reported that we are within five miles of Dallas. May 26, left camp at 7 a. m. and marched, as we supposed, toward Dallas for two and a half miles over all the moderate sized big hills that could be crowded into that distance, and halted on the side of one d, passing by our camp of last night, marched on another road to Dallas, Ga., which we reached at 2 p. m., and, passing through, formed in listill remains in line of battle. May 29, in line of battle near Dallas, Ga., until just after dark, when we received orders to and moved out and lay quietly in line all day. May 31, in line of battle near Dallas, Ga. Nothing of note occurred save that the enemy threw a few shells rning without loss. June 2 and 3, lay in works eight miles from Dallas, Ga. Lost 1 man by sharpshooting of the enemy. June 4, were relieved
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 138 (search)
Ohio to occupy North Rome. May 19 to 23, remained in camp near Rome. May 23, crossed at the mouth to the south side of the Etowah River. May 24, marched toward Dallas. May 25, reached Dallas. May 26, no change. May 27, in forming line a gap of two and a half miles was discovered between General Hooker's right and the left ofDallas. May 26, no change. May 27, in forming line a gap of two and a half miles was discovered between General Hooker's right and the left of General McPherson. Under orders, I detailed the Thirty-fourth Illinois to find the line and complete the connection between these two wings of the army. The dangerous duty was performed with eminent satisfaction, though the colonel, with a small squad of his men, passed at one time through the enemy's picket-line. By midthat time this command has been under constant fire. We participated in the engagements at Tunnel Hill, Mill Creek Gap, Resaca, Rome, Kenesaw Mountain, Marietta, Dallas, Peach Tree Creek, Atlanta, and Jonesborough. The list of our losses, herewith forwarded, will tell more plainly than words can the price our success has cost.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 139 (search)
soon as the enemy should appear in force, which they soon did, advancing upon my line rapidly, but receiving several damaging volleys as they came up. The skirmish line joined the reserve, and, acting upon the instructions spoken of, the whole line was ordered back slowly, when the Third Brigade filed in between my line and that of the enemy, taking the fight off our hands. My loss was 1 commissioned officer bruised, 3 men wounded, and 1 taken prisoner. From Rome the division marched to Dallas, Ga., rejoining the main Army May 27. The next day, in obedience to orders from Colonel Mitchell, I started with my regiment to open communication between the left of General Davis and the right of General Butterfield's division, of the Twentieth Army Corps. The guard sent by General Davis to pilot me through being but little acquainted with the locality, led me near the enemy's line, and judging by the firing that we were going too far to the right, I sent out skirmishers, who soon develope
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 140 (search)
, some forty miles due south. On the afternoon of the 17th skirmished with the enemy, driving him to his main line of fortifications before the city. On the morning of the 18th, the enemy having evacuated the place in the night, we went into camp, and remained until the 23d. In the capture of Rome, a considerable amount of stores fell into our possession. Again advancing, we crossed the Etowah, and marched in a southeasterly course, coming up with the enemy on the evening of the 26th at Dallas. The morning of the 27th we moved into position half mile north of the town. At 12 m. changed front, and advanced half mile to the east. The evening of the 28th moved one mile to the left and fortified. 29th, the regiment briskly engaged on the skirmish line. 31st, at 10 p. m. again moved to the left. June I, under a scorching sun, the whole division moved some five miles to the left, and went into position, relieving a division of the Fourth Corps, the Seventy-eighth on the front line
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 141 (search)
ough Rome, encamped one mile south of it. Companies D and I were on the 19th detailed to guard wagon train to Resaca. May 24, marched sixteen miles toward Van Wert, and bivouacked for the night at Big Spring. May 25, marched fifteen miles toward Dallas, and, bivouacking for the night, resumed march at an early hour on following morning; reached Dallas at 3 p. m., where we were rejoined by Companies D and I. On the 27th the regiment was on the skirmish line, and, advancing the line one and a haDallas at 3 p. m., where we were rejoined by Companies D and I. On the 27th the regiment was on the skirmish line, and, advancing the line one and a half miles, came up to the enemy strongly intrenched on a high hill. Our only loss in the advance was that of Thomas C. Case, Company C, who, it is supposed by many, accidentally shot himself dead. The regiment remained skirmishing constantly and heavily with the enemy until midnight of the 28th, when it was relieved; lost in killed on the 28th, James N. Finney, Company C. The regiment was in camp on the 29th, 30th, and 31st. On the last-mentioned day we were heavily shelled by the enemy, and
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 142 (search)
finding the enemy in front of Rome, we were formed in line on the right center, but were afterward moved by the right flank and took position on the right of the brigade, our front covered by skirmishers. We then advanced through a dense undergrowth of pine until night-fall, when we stopped and intrenched. In the morning, the enemy having disappeared, we encamped north of the city. On the 23d moved across the Oostenaula, through Rome, and then across the Etowah. 24th and 25th, marched to Dallas. 26th, remained in camp. 27th, the brigade took position on the left of the Army of the Tennessee. 28th, were deployed as skirmishers, connecting McPherson and Hooker. 29th, returned to our former position. 30th, position unchanged. 31st, relieved and marched to the left. June 1, moved still farther to the left, and relieved a part of the Twenty-third Army Corps. 2d and 3d, position unchanged. 4th, relieved by a part of General Whitaker's brigade. 5th, moved to the left and reliev
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 143 (search)
e south side of the Coosa River. On the morning of the 24th we took up the line of march for Dallas, Ga.; arrived at Cave Spring and camped for the night; Private Samuel Henry, Company G, was wounded by the premature discharge of his gun. Moved on the 25th and bivouacked near Dallas, Ga. On the 27th moved into position and intrenched a line on the left of the Fifteenth Corps, on what is called the Dallas line. On the 28th and 29th occupied the trenches; no casualties, though the enemy shelled our line. On the 30th the regiment was deployed as skirmishers across a gap of over a mile betweehio, returned and joined the command. On the 1st of June the army abandoned the right of the Dallas line, our division moving to the left and relieving a division of the Twenty-third Corps, the On not permit him to be absent from nis command in the hour of peril and aanger. He joined us at Dallas on the 30th of May, and in less than a month, on the 27th of June, at the assault upon the enemy
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 144 (search)
he morning a light line of works was constructed during the night. During this night the enemy evacuated their works and moved across the Oostenaula River, burning the bridges after them. May 18, early, the Eightyfifth Illinois crossed and occupied the town. May 19, the entire brigade crossed in newly constructed pontoons and encamped in the suburbs of the town, where it remained, doing various military duties, until the morning of the 24th of May, when it marched with the division toward Dallas, reaching that place about noon May 26 and took up position about a half mile to the left of town; remained thus until the next morning, when we moved to the mouth of Gap. Here the brigade was placed in single line, with the One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois deployed as skirmishers. At about 10 o'clock of the night of the 27th of May the enemy attacked the skirmish line and captured 1 commissioned officer and 14 enlisted men, when a countercharge was made, which resulted in the capture
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 145 (search)
battle occurred on afternoon of May 17, the contest lasting until night-fall. The enemy then retreated across the Oostenaula and burned the bridge. Early on the morning of 18th, the Eighty-fifth leading the column, we followed the retreating enemy, crossing the river as best we could by swimming, on rafts and in canoes. Our flag was hoisted upon the court-house, and rebellious Rome was again under Federal rule. The regiment lay in temporary camp at Rome till May 23; then marching through Dallas, took position about one mile beyond. By a succession of movements we were soon placed near the center of the army. In these movements our hardships were great, owing to long marches, bad roads, and wet weather. The rebel line in the Allatoona Mountains was evacuated June 5. On the 10th we pursued, and he was soon driven till his line rested across Kenesaw Mountain. The position assigned to my regiment was near the base of the mountain. Here the line was often subjected to a most terri
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 146 (search)
tory was ours. My regiment in this engagement lost 6 men killed and 11 wounded. The loss was light in comparison to the work done. On the following day I marched my regiment with the brigade triumphantly into the city of Rome. To the valor of the Eighty-sixth Illinois belongs a large share of the honor of having wrested from the enemy a very important military point. At Rome. I remained encamped with the brigade until May 24, when the whole brigade resumed its march southward toward Dallas, Ga., where it arrived May 26. From this date to June 15 nothing transpired that would be of any importance in this report. With the exception of changing position, relieving and being relieved on the sirkmish line and following up the enemy, who in the mean time had fallen back .a short distance, nothing occurred. On the 15th of June six companies of my regiment were deployed as skirmishers, and in advancing the lines 2 men were wounded. On the 16th of June I had 2 more men wounded on the
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