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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
ommand under me — now Sherman's. General J. E. Johnston was defending Atlanta and the interior of Georgia with an army, the largest part of which was stationed at Dalton, about 38 miles south of Chattanooga. Dalton is at the junction of the railroad from Cleveland with the one from Chattanooga to Atlanta. There could have beeDalton is at the junction of the railroad from Cleveland with the one from Chattanooga to Atlanta. There could have been no difference of opinion as to the first duty of the armies of the Military Division of the Mississippi. Johnston's army was the first objective, and that important railroad center, Atlanta, the second. At the time I wrote General Halleck giving my views of the approaching campaign, and at the time I met General Sherman, it; wof the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana. On December 27th, 1863, he assumed command of the Army of Tennessee, superseding Bragg.--editors. was at Dalton, Georgia, opposed to Sherman, who was still at Chattanooga. Besides these main armies, the Confederates had to guard the Shenandoah Valley--a great storehouse to feed
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.35 (search)
objectives were Lee's army behind the Rapidan in Virginia, and Joseph E. Johnston's army at Dalton, Georgia. On reaching Washington, Grant studied with great care all the minutiae of the organiza R. Co. On the historic 4th day of May, 1864, the Confederate army at my front lay at Dalton, Georgia, composed, according to the best authority, of about 45,000 men [see also p. 281], commande465,--grand total, 98,797 men and 254 guns. I had no purpose to attack Johnston's position at Dalton in front, but marched from Chattanooga to feign at his front and to make a lodgment in Resaca, end supply. The movement was partly, not wholly, successful; but it compelled Johnston to let go Dalton and fight us at Resaca, where, May 13th-16th, our loss was 2747 and his 2800. I fought offensivcontinued thence the destruction of the railroad for about twenty miles to the tunnel, including Dalton, whose garrison he captured. I followed up to Resaca, then turned west to intercept his retreat
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. (search)
e on their war resources. The occupation of Dalton by General Bragg had been accidental. He had ned next morning that the pursuit had ceased. Dalton is in a valley so broad as to give ample room t gave advantage to the Confederates. Between Dalton and Atlanta the only mountain in sight of the ake quick communication between that point and Dalton, two rough country roads were so improved as tht; Cleburne behind Mill Creek and in front of Dalton. Walker's division was in reserve. Cantey M. of the 13th the Confederate army moved from Dalton and reached Resaca just as the Federal troops t a strange ignorance of the country between. Dalton and Atlanta. Mr. Davis describes mountain rid Ala. (which was discontinued), and from Rome, Dalton, Atlanta, and from many other places in Georgihich the country supposed Atlanta to be. At Dalton, the great numerical superiority of the enemy t would have been utterly disastrous. Between Dalton and the Chattahoochee we could have given batt[8 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opening of the Atlanta campaign. (search)
Dug Gap, less than four miles south-west from Dalton, on the main road from Dalton to Lafayette, anDalton to Lafayette, and perhaps six miles from Mill Creek Gap; and Snake Creek Gap, some eighteen miles south from Mill C Creek Gap, and cut his communications between Dalton and the Oostenaula. Neither of these gaps wing of the 7th of May, on its way from Rome to Dalton. General Sherman had in hand for attack neaion of Dug Gap by Hooker not only would render Dalton untenable, but would make a retreat from DaltoDalton by the line of the railroad extremely hazardous, and completely protect McPherson from attack on hnew that they were holding one of the doors to Dalton. I hold in my hand the official report of Gan the easy means of causing the evacuation of Dalton and the retreat to Resaca, is undoubtedly true. That we could have held Dalton or made an attack on Sherman if these gaps had been held is a probe Dug Gap, and that consequently the road from Dalton was free to any Confederate column moving on h
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate strength in the Atlanta campaign. (search)
private soldiers for duty, equipped. That the cavalry had an effective total of but 2392 with 8436 officers and men for duty is accounted for by the fact that a large number of horses were grazing in the rear because of the scarcity of forage at Dalton. They were brought to the front and the men. became effective when Sherman's army began to advance. General Johnston's statement that his artillery comprised but 112 pieces is a manifest error, for the return plainly says 35 companies, 144 piece 10th shows an increase since May 20th of 649 returned from desertion and 799 joined by enlistment. General Johnston has to account, between April 30th and June 10th, for at least the following men available for battle: Present for duty at DaltonApril 30th52,992 Mercer's brigadeMay 2d 2,800 Cantey's divisionMay 7th 5,300 Loring's divisionMay 10th, 11th, and 12th5,145 French's detachmentMay 12th 550 French's divisionMay 19th 4,174 Jackson's cavalryMay 17th 4,477 Jackson's cavalry in
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
ll., Col. Silas Miller, Capt. James B. McNeal, Lieut.-Col. Porter C. Olson; 44th Ill., Col. Wallace W. Barrett, Lieut.-Col. John Russell, Maj. Luther M. Sabin, Lieut.-Col. John Russell; 73d Ill., Maj. Thomas W. Motherspaw; 74th Ill., Col. Jason Marsh, Lieut.-Col. John B. Kerr, Capt. Thomas J. Bryan; 88th Ill., Lieut.-Col. George W. Chandler, Lieut.-Col. George W. Smith; 28th Ky., Transferred to Second Brigade May 28th. Lieut.-Col. J. Rowan Boone, Maj. George W. Barth; 2d Mo., Remained at Dalton from May 14th. Lieut.-Col. Arnold Beck, Col. Bernard Laiboldt; 15th Mo., Col. Joseph Conrad; 24th Wis., Lieut.-Col. Theodore S. West, Maj. Arthur MacArthur, Jr. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George D. Wagner, Col. John W. Blake, Brig.-Gen. George D. Wagner: 100th Ill., Maj. Charles M. Hammond, Col. Frederick A. Bartleson, Maj. Charles M. Hammond; 40th Ind., Col. John W. Blake, Lieut.-Col. Henry Learning; 57th Ind., Lieut.-Col. George W. Lennard, Lieut.-Col. Willis Blanch; 26th Ohio, Lieut.-Col.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
and, east Tennessee, through Red Clay, toward. Dalton, Georgia. The three railway lines uniting Chattanooga, Cleveland, and Dalton form an almost equilateral triangle. Dalton, its south-east vertex, was the center of thDalton, its south-east vertex, was the center of the Confederate army, under Joseph E. Johnston. Pushing out from Dalton toward us at Catoosa Springs, Johnston Dalton toward us at Catoosa Springs, Johnston occupied the famous pass through Taylor's Ridge, Buzzard-Roost Gap, and part of the ridge itself; and held, foran along the eastern side of the triangle, between Dalton and Red Clay. Johnston, according to his officiaassed through. Stoneman rushed into the village of Dalton from the north, and the Fourth Corps, eager and rapept close to the chasing cavalry. Not far south of Dalton we came upon a bothersome Confederate rear-guard, wsaca. Thus we ended the combats of Tunnel Hill and Dalton, and opened up Resaca. As soon as Johnston reachwas repaired seemed miraculous. We had hardly left Dalton before trains with ammunition and other supplies ar
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Georgia militia about Atlanta. (search)
ause his right flank was turned by the Federal army. And on the 17th of July the Confederate Government relieved him from the command of the army he had led from Dalton to the gates of Atlanta without engaging in a decisive battle. When he relinquished command on the 18th McPherson's army was closely approaching the east side the 1st of September, after he had held Sherman closely at bay for seventy-five days. It will be noticed that Sherman had succeeded in forcing Johnston back from Dalton to Atlanta in a somewhat less length of time. My report of September 15th, 1864, says: A few days after the affair of the 22d of July I was ordered again them give up all the territory in north Georgia which had been yielded to them by General Johnston. The backing, digging, and constant service in trenches, from Dalton to Atlanta, had very perceptibly injured the morale of the Confederate forces before General Johnston was relieved from command. The condition of that army had n
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.43 (search)
essee. The troops of the Army of Tennessee had for such length of time been subjected to the ruinous policy pursued from Dalton to Atlanta that they were unfitted for united action in pitched battle. They had, in other words, been so long habituate06,000 Federals, buoyant with success and hope, and who were fully equal to 140,000 such troops as confronted Johnston at Dalton, by reason of their victorious march of a hundred miles into the heart of the Confederacy. Accordingly, on the night oeral Wheeler, with 4500 men, to begin operations at once. He succeeded in burning the bridge over the Etowah; recaptured Dalton and Resaca; destroyed about 35 miles of railroad in the vicinity, and captured about 300 mules and 1000 horses; he destroday and night, with a force of about 45,000 against an army of 106,000 effectives, flushed with victory upon victory from Dalton to Atlanta. Union defenses at Allatoona pass (see also P. 323). from a War-time photograph. A. J. Smith's and Port
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
e should lose no time in moving. On the 11th the army crossed the Coosa River, marched in the direction of Resaca and Dalton, and bivouacked that night fourteen miles above Coosaville and ten miles north-west of Rome. That same day Major-Genera Having thus relieved the army of all incumbance, and made ready for battle, we marched rapidly to Resaca, and thence to Dalton, via Sugar Valley Post-Office. Lieutenant-General Lee moved upon Resaca, with instructions to display his forces and demaault the Federal works, and commenced at once the destruction of the railroad. On the 13th I demanded the surrender of Dalton, which, in the first instance, was refused, but was finally acceded to at 4 P. M. The garrison consisted of about one thoff,--not alone from corps commanders, but from officers of less rank,--whether or not my impressions after the capture of Dalton were correct, and I could rely upon the troops entering into battle at least hopeful of victory. I took measures to obta