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evavation four and a half miles south-west of Dalton, covered with forests, some undergrowth, and lbreastworks and fortifications to the right of Dalton. The movement had the desired effect, compellting the enemy's fortifications on the left of Dalton. Brisk firing was heard in the direction of hposed, will fall back from the gap in front of Dalton, and give McPherson battle, or retreat hastilysed it against any direct advance of ours upon Dalton; the fearless charge of Colonel B. F. Scribnerside of the ridge, and effect an entrance into Dalton in that way? By so doing he would cut himselfd passed through Buzzard Roost Gap and entered Dalton, finding the place entirely evacuated by the elast was readily understood. After entering Dalton the day before, and finding nothing there save Johnston had been compelled to withdraw from Dalton — Sherman had followed with his main army, andh inst., the morning we reached our lines near Dalton, we had one man killed, James Self, a brave fe[20 more...]
e, and the cavalry displayed remarkable abandon and contempt for our fire, oily retiring when compelled to by overwhelming numbers. On comparison of notes by brigade commanders, it was found that less than ten wounded was our total loss in the occupation of the town and the surrounding ridges. Immediately on the retirement of the energy Stanley threw his column forward along the ridge overlooking the approach to Buzzard Roost, and joined his right to Palmer at the wagon road leading to Dalton. At one P. M., a small brigade of rebel infantry approached within a mile of our advance and formed in an open field, but a few well-directed shots from the Fifth Indiana battery soon dispersed them, and they retired, leaving a small picket force. Generals Sherman and Thomas were early on Tunnel Hill, and to-night have their headquarters within a mile of our advance line. Both Generals watched every movement of the enemy, and gave their orders with a coolness and confidence that proved
kirmishers of the enemy, who in small force extended across the ridge. The enemy was slowly driven from the ridge toward Dalton, retreating before the unerring fire of the brave regiment that confronted them. So many natural and artificial obstruct. As I have already said, Schofield's corps is working east of the rebel positions, while Hooker's bears south-west of Dalton, and McPherson, with a large army, is aiming at Resacca, in the rear of the rebel works at Dalton. Geary's division is iDalton. Geary's division is in front of Dug Gap, in John's Mountain, which is a precipitous elevavation four and a half miles south-west of Dalton, covered with forests, some undergrowth, and loose with tumbling boulders. About three o'clock this afternoon Colonel Buschbeck'Dalton, covered with forests, some undergrowth, and loose with tumbling boulders. About three o'clock this afternoon Colonel Buschbeck's and Colonel Candy's brigades, the first consisting of the One Hundred and Nineteenth, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth, One Hundred and Fifty-fourth, New York, Twenty-seventh, Seventy-third, One Hundred and Ninth, Pennsylvania, and Thirty-third Now Je
the divisions of Stanley and Wood forward into the gaps facing the enemy's breastworks and fortifications to the right of Dalton. The movement had the desired effect, compelling the enemy to open his artillery, and expose the position of his batteriield, with his corps, succeeded about one o'clock in getting up and confronting the enemy's fortifications on the left of Dalton. Brisk firing was heard in the direction of his position, and I learn to-night that he holds, like the centre and right ermitted to occupy so vital a defile without great opposition. His present position is about thirty miles in the rear of Dalton, and in all probability the enemy, in finding his flanks and rear exposed, will fall back from the gap in front of DaltonDalton, and give McPherson battle, or retreat hastily without offering fight. The loss of Newton's division (chiefly in Harker's brigade) on Rocky Face Ridge, was, up to last evening, one field and one line officer and fifteen men killed, and three line
ssippi. It consisted of one hundred and ten (110) wagons, and over five hundred mules. We burned the wagons, shot or sabred all the mules we could not lead off or use to mount prisoners, and started back. In one of the wagons was Colonel McCrosky, of Hood's infantry, who had been badly wounded at Franklin. I left a tent with him, some stores, and one of the prisoners to take care of him; about twenty of the teamsters were colored United States soldiers of the garrison captured by Hood at Dalton — these came back with us. We returned via Tollgate and the old Military and Hackleburg roads, capturing an ambulance, with its guard, on the way, to within twenty-five miles south of Russelville, when I found that Roddy's force, and the so-called brigades of Biffles and Russel were already stationed in our front at Bear Creek, and on the Biler road towards Moulton, to retard us, while Armstrong was reported as being in pursuit. The country was very difficult and rugged, with few road
ssippi. It consisted of one hundred and ten (110) wagons, and over five hundred mules. We burned the wagons, shot or sabred all the mules we could not lead off or use to mount prisoners, and started back. In one of the wagons was Colonel McCrosky, of Hood's infantry, who had been badly wounded at Franklin. I left a tent with him, some stores, and one of the prisoners to take care of him; about twenty of the teamsters were colored United States soldiers of the garrison captured by Hood at Dalton — these came back with us. We returned via Tollgate and the old Military and Hackleburg roads, capturing an ambulance, with its guard, on the way, to within twenty-five miles south of Russelville, when I found that Roddy's force, and the so-called brigades of Biffles and Russel were already stationed in our front at Bear Creek, and on the Biler road towards Moulton, to retard us, while Armstrong was reported as being in pursuit. The country was very difficult and rugged, with few road
m I read the letter, knew that woman well, and said it was characteristic of her; but I will not weary you by turning aside to relate the various incidents of giving up the last son to the cause of our country, known to me. Wherever we go we find the hearts and hands of our noble women enlisted. They are seen wherever the eye may fall or the step turn. They have one duty to perform; to buoy up the hearts of our people. I know the deep disgrace felt by Georgia at our army falling back from Dalton to the interior of the State. But I was not of those who considered Atlanta lost when our army crossed the Chattahoochee. I resolved that it should not, and I then put a man in command who I knew would strike a manly blow for the city, and many a Yankee's blood was made to nourish the soil before the prize was won. It does not become us to revert to disaster. Let the dead bury the dead. Let us, with one arm and one effort, endeavor to crush Sherman. I am going to the army to confer with
e works on the roads east of the ridge, and at Dalton. Early on the morning of the thirteenth, I mokirmishing commenced. We drove to and through Dalton; my forces (Ninth and Thirty-sixth Indiana), t the history of the war. The enemy driven from Dalton, his stronghold, over rivers and mountains, nao near Red Clay, on the Georgia line, north of Dalton. The enemy lay in and about Dalton, superioDalton, superior to me in cavalry (Wheeler's), and with three corps of infantry and artillery, viz: Hardee's, Hood'e ninth General Schofield pushed down close on Dalton, from the north, while General Thomas renewed dangering his left flank from the direction of Dalton, he could find no road by which he could rapidHoward's corps, and some cavalry left to watch Dalton, was in motion on the west side of Rocky-Face st to General Thomas' left. Johnston had left Dalton, and General Howard entered it and pressed hishroughout your long and circuitous route, from Dalton to Jonesboroa, you have buried them. Your t[22 more...]
icient to protect East Tennessee from incursions from the enemy's force at Dalton, Georgia. West Virginia was substantially within our lines. Virginia, with the exctomac. The army under Johnston occupied a strongly-intrenched position at Dalton, Georgia, covering and defending Atlanta, Georgia, a place of great importance as aspectively by Generals Thomas, McPherson and Schofield, upon Johnston's army at Dalton; but finding the enemy's positions at Buzzard Roost, covering Dalton, too stronDalton, too strong to be assaulted, General McPherson was sent through Snake G(ap to turn it, while Generals Thomas and Schofield threatened it in front and on the north. This movemeer Wheeler attempted to cut his communications in the rear, but was repulsed at Dalton, and driven into East Tennessee, whence it proceeded west to McMinnville, Murfre Tennessee river firmly, you may make it, destroying all the railroad south of Dalton or Chattanooga, as you think best. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. Major-Gene
ooga, and quietly make preparations to defend his post. On the thirteenth, one corps of Hood's army appeared in front of Dalton, and a summons to surrender, signed by Hood in person, was sent in to Colonel Johnson, Forty-fourth United States coloredneral Steedman's command arrived at Bridgeport, where he received orders to proceed to Chattanooga. After remaining at Dalton one day, during which he destroyed about five miles of railroad, the enemy moved off to the westward, through Nickajack GJohnston, had so skilfully resisted the advance of the whole active army of the Military Division of the Mississippi from Dalton to the Chattahoochee, reinforced by a well-equipped and enthusiastic cavalry command of over twelve thousand men, led by ort, Mississippi; Wood's corps to be concentrated at Huntsville and Athens, Alabama; Schofield's corps to proceed to Dalton, Georgia; and Wilson's cavalry, after sending one division to Eastport, Mississippi, to concentrate the balance at or near Hu
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