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ur guns, replied gallantly. . . . More important events directed my attention from this point, though Granger's Battery, Tenth Massachusetts, was sent forward to relieve Beck, that the latter might replenish his ammunition. . . . . Knowing the views of my superiors, I had determined to assault the bridge and gain possession of the high ground beyond. Gen Egan, whose division occupied the crest of the ridge near Burgess' Tavern, had been entrusted with the necessary preparations. . . . . . McAllister's Brigade of Mott's Division was still in line of battle facing the approaches from the upper bridge. Probably the bridge here referred to is the one crossed by the Claiborne Road, which leaves the White Oak Road about two miles west of Burgess' Tavern, and was in our prospective line of march. The remaining brigade of Mott's Division, It must not be understood from this that there were but two brigades in this division. De Trobriand's brigade is located by Hancock in the report, b
er flank of Gen. Smythe's (Second) Division, which was facing generally westward. Running nearly at right angles with this division, with a kind of swamp or marsh intervening, was Gen. McAllister's Brigade of the Third Division, facing northward. Our guns were on Smythe's side of the marsh, and had been engaging a Rebel battery, firing over his line, and anticipating an attack from that quarter, when, with hardly a premonition in the way of skirmishing, the enemy came out of the woods in McAllister's front, evidently having discovered the interval between his left and Smythe's right, and bent on penetrating it. The Tenth was the only battery on the field, and this was its opportunity. Lieut. Green at once directed his guns to fire to the rear, and being exactly on the Rebels' flank, every shot enfiladed their advancing lines. Lieut. Adams also turned his guns upon the triple line. His fire was oblique to the enemy's front and did great execution. Never did shells do more effectiv
ehead,Sept. 9, 1862,Prisoner Aug. 25, 1864. June 9, 1865, exp. of service. Martin, William H.,23Marblehead,Sept. 9, 1862,April 22, 1863, disability. Mason, Charles A.,18Northbridge,Dec. 21, 1863,Mortally wounded Aug. 25, 1864, Reams Station, Va. Maxwell, Albert N. A.,21E. Boston,Sept. 9, 1862,Died Feb. 20, 1864, Washington, D. C. Maynard, John C.,28Taunton,Oct. 28, 1864,June 9, 1865, expiration of service. McAuliffe, Cornelius,39N. BridgewaterSept. 2, 1864,.June 17, 1865, disability. McAllister, Daniel,30Cambridge,Sept. 9, 1862,June 9, 1865, expiration of service. Merrill, Alonzo N.,29Marblehead,Sept. 9, 1862,June 9, 1865, expiration of service. Mercier, Moses, 20Taunton,Nov. 21, 1864,June 9, 1865, expiration of service. Millett, John,28Marblehead,Sept. 9, 1862,Prisoner Aug. 25, 1864. June 9, 1865, exp. of service. Mins, Francis,32Barre,Dec. 28, 1863,June 9, 1865, expiration of service. Monroe, Frank A., 21Worcester,Jan. 5, 1864,Transf'd 1864, V. R.C.; discharged June 30, 18
y 19, 1907 Jewell, Edwin C.—— Jones, HenryApril—, 1896 Johnson, Stephen H.May 1, 1907 Kay, James (?)Aug. 25, 1864 Killoran, HughJuly 22, 1881 Knowland, John H.April 7, 1891 Lee, James—— Loham, FrancisMarch 14, 1895 Maxwell, Albert N. A.Feb. 20, 1864 Mullett, Emerson B.May 10, 1864 Mason, Charles A.Aug. 26, 1864 Macomber, Francis L.Dec. 28, 1864 Mugford, John E.—— Martin, William H.May 19, 1889 Millett, JohnJune 28, 1895 Monroe, Frank A.Nov. 19, 1891 McAuliffe, Cornelius—— McAllister, DanielJuly 29, 1906 Newton, HarmonSept. 18, 1864 Nesbitt, John Northey, William E.Jan. 3, 1879 Nichols, George H.April 8, 1892 Nichols, Wm. B. Nowell, TimothyJuly 23, 1893 Neagle, Patrick E.—— Orcutt, HenrySept. 28, 1879 Oliver, Hiram B.Jan. —, 1897 O'Connell, JeremiahMay 5, 1905 Pierce, George H.Mar. 15, 1864 Pierce, WaldoApril 16, 1881 Pierce, Leverett——– Putnam, George K.Nov. 21, 1864 Putnam, George H.April 8, 1906 Peach, JamesFeb. 6, 1865 Pa
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
ur Shaaf; Capts. (A) H. D. Twyman, (B) A. L. Hartridge, (C) William H. Ross, (D) G. C. Dent. It served on the Georgia coast through 1862 and 1863; was drilled to act either as infantry or heavy artillery; was distinguished in the defense of Fort McAllister in the attack upon that little fortress in February, 1863, and was sent to the army of Tennessee in time to take part in the battles of Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge. It participated in the Atlanta and Tennessee campaigns, and in the sprganization were: Maj. John T. Davis, Capts. (A) E. W. Moise, (B) L. J. Smith, (C) F. E. Burke, W. E. Cropp and E. C. Anderson, (D) J. H. Sykes and P. A. L. Morris, (E) P. Beasley, (F) J. R. Johnson and C. C. Bowen, (G) T. S. Hopkins, (H) J. L. McAllister, (I) F. G. Pitt, (K) L. W. Phillips and I. S. McAllister. The regiment returned to Virginia and took part in the final campaign that closed at Appomattox. The Eighth Georgia cavalry regiment was organized with the following officers: Col. J
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
uk, was sent down below Savannah by Admiral Dupont for a trial of its effectiveness against Fort McAllister. The latter work, constructed by Confederate engineers on Genesis point, guarded the approlarly against sand batteries. For seven hours the 15 and 1-inch shell and shot were hurled at McAllister, and the mortar boats kept up the din all night following, the only effect being to temporarilrican Conflict, says that from this time the Union fleets saved their ammunition by letting Fort McAllister alone. At this period great apprehension was felt on the coast regarding the fleet whichannah river defenses was 44 guns and 4 mortars. On the southward coast region there were Fort McAllister, Rosedew battery, Beaulieu battery, Isle of Hope siege train, Thunderbolt battery, Greenwicarrived he was stationed by General Mercer off Carston's bluff on account of the attacks on Fort McAllister. The government becoming impatient, the gallant old commodore was relieved, and Lieut. Wil
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
on the Texas coast and in Virginia. Commodore Tattnall remained at the head of the naval forces. During the year the Savannah; an armored ship, was completed, and the Milledgeville was launched. After the abandonment of the attacks on Fort McAllister, Ossabaw sound was usually guarded alone by the Federal gunboat Waterwitch, a famous side-wheel steamer which had taken part in the Paraguay war of 1855, and fought against Commodore Hollins in the Mississippi passes. Captain Hunter detailend Mercer artillery, effective total 253; at Isle of Hope, three light batteries, 176 men; at Rosedew, two companies Cobb guards, 135 men; at Beaulieu, Hanleiter's light artillery and two companies Twenty-seventh battalion, 218 effective; at Fort McAllister, Brooks' light battery and Company A, Twenty-seventh battalion, 93 men, and the First Georgia regulars, 238 effective, in charge of Federal officers imprisoned; at Oglethorpe barracks, three companies reserves, 145 men; at White Bluff, Guera
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
The fate of Atlanta Hood's advance in North Georgia attack on Allatoona Sherman's March to the sea fall of Fort McAllister evacuation of Savannah Georgians in the Nashville campaign. Immediately after his return to Atlanta from Jonestions with the Federal fleet, Howard marched farther south and rebuilt King's bridge, while Kilpatrick reconnoitered Fort McAllister, upon which fire was opened by DeGress' battery on the 13th. Hazen's division, which, with J. E. Smith's division, and later had forced a passage across the Canouchee opposed by Confederate infantry and artillery, was sent against Fort McAllister, the vicinity of which was reached about 11 a. m. on December 13th. They were delayed by the picket line and torpedindividually overpowered. The report of General Hazen is as high a compliment as the brave Confederate garrison of Fort McAllister could desire. The Federal loss in the assault was 24 killed and 110 wounded. Sherman, who was watching the assau
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
lion Georgia sharpshooters. This command was brought by him and its other officers to a high state of discipline and efficiency. In February and March, 1863, he won general attention and commendation by his plucky and successful defense of Fort McAllister against the Federal monitors, in which combat it was demonstrated that Georgia gunners behind sand embankments were more than a match for the new and much vaunted revolving ironclads. Major Anderson had been promoted to the rank of colonel of the Fifth Georgia cavalry on January 20, 1863, and commanded the troops in the neighborhood of Fort McAllister. General Beauregard in his official report to the war department, commended very highly the conduct of officers and men engaged in this affair. The Fifth cavalry was transferred to the army of Tennessee before the opening of the Atlanta campaign of 1864, and assigned to the brigade of Gen. W. W. Allen, composed of the Georgia cavalry regiments known as the Third, Eighth, Tenth and
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
s a matter of the first importance to destroy her. Nothing but the most constant watchfulness prevented her egress. She lay in an unassailable position above Fort McAllister, a strong and well-constructed earthwork, which was so placed as to enfilade the narrow and difficult channel for a mile below. The river had been staked oppay a point of swampy land, which formed the sharp bend in the river below which the obstructions had been placed. Planting himself directly under the fire of Fort McAllister, to which he made no attempt to reply, Worden opened deliberately upon the Nashville, whose upper works only were visible across the swamp, until he had deterssel but the smoking fragments of her hull. To the Montauk, the battle had been no more than an hour's target practice of a winter morning. The gunners of Fort McAllister, either unprepared or demoralized, made bad work of it, and struck the ironclad only five times, doing no damage. The gunboats, remaining at a considerable d
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