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cashed a draft of McA.'s before, payable to Cockson. The present draft was paid on the 2d of November. As soon as it was pronounced a forgery, he went to the Virginia Bank and found that it was paid to order of Cockson, through a letter. [Witness detailed some further testimony relative to a visit of Cockson to New York, where he gave a draft through Clark, Dodge & Co., brokers, for $150, the balance being drawn on checks for $25 each.] Mr. Sutton did not believe that this draft was in McAllister's handwriting.--If isolated, he would have no hesitation in taking it; but on comparing it with others, he did not believe it genuine. Mr. McAllister testified that the draft was not in his handwriting, nor was it given by his authority. There were two others in the firm besides himself, but he transacted all the financial business. They are contractors on the Covington and Ohio Railroad, and Enders, Sutton & Co. were their bankers. He had given drafts to Cockson several times. He
ut they were often reinforced, while our troops had, owing to the extended lines of the army, and also their position on the extreme right, to fight unassisted. More gallant fighting never took place than that of the Union troops. Exposed to the terrible firing of triple their number, they stood their ground until, in some regiments, every officer was killed or wounded. At last, and reluctantly, regiment by regiment, they slowly fell back, leaving Schwartz's battery and three of McAllister's guns in the rebel's hands. Retiring a few hundred yards they then made a stand, and Gen. Smith arrived with reinforcements and at once drove the enemy again into their works. The rebels, from their advantageous positions, showered upon our ranks most murderous volleys of musketry, grape and canister, killing and wounding our men, almost by companies, at every round. Yet every man stood his ground bravely. These four regiments held their ground, dealing death, and dying and fighti
From the commencement of the battle in the morning until 1 o'clock the fighting was terrible. The troops on the right were disposed as follows: First, McArthur's brigade, consisting of the 9th, 12th and 41st Illinois, having temporarily attached the 17th and 19th Illinois. Next came Oglesby's brigade, the 8th, 18th, 29th, 30th and 31th Illinois, and Schwartz's and Dresser's batteries. Next, Col. W. H. L. Wallace's brigade, the 11th, 12th, 45th and 48th Illinois, and Taylor's and McAllister's batteries. These three brigades composed McClenand's division, and bore the brunt of the battle. The enemy concentrated his main force on our right, to turn it, which was done by our men getting out of ammunition, and the confusion created in getting up reinforcements. The division retreated about half a mile. As soon as McClernand's division, who had stood their ground so manfully for three hours, retired to procure ammunition, the enemy occupied the field. At this time
rigade, Col. Raift commanding, Seventeenth, Twenty-ninth and Forty-ninth Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Wood, F rroll and Peter, and Forty-third Illinois, Colonel Marsh. Besides this fine show of experienced troops they had sebartz's, Dresser's, McAllister's and Waterhouse's batteries. As already stated, McClernand was first called into action shortly after the surprise of Sherman's left brigade (Buckland's)--about seven in the morning--by having to move up his left brigade to support Shermae wounded, and carried from the field. Line officers had suffered heavily. The batteries were broken up. Schwartz had lost half his guns, and sixteen horses. Dresser had lost several of his rifled pieces, three caissons and eighteen horses. McAllister had lost half of his twenty-four pound howitzers. The soldiers fought bravely to the last — let no man question that — but they were at a fearful disadvantage. Gradually they began falling back, more slowly than had Prentiss's regiment, o
Attack on Fort McAllister, Savannah, March 3. --2 P. M.--The enemy are attaching Fort McAllister. The attack commenced at thirty minutes past eight o'clock this morning. Three iron clads and two mortar boats are playing on the fort. Our 8-inch Columbiad had been dismounted, and two men slightly wounded. The firing conFort McAllister. The attack commenced at thirty minutes past eight o'clock this morning. Three iron clads and two mortar boats are playing on the fort. Our 8-inch Columbiad had been dismounted, and two men slightly wounded. The firing continues very heavy. [second Dispatch.] Savannah, March 3--5.30 P. M. --A dispatch from Fort McAllister, dated 3.46, says that one of the iron clads has withdrawn. Two iron-clads and one mortar boat are still playing on the fort.--The fort is uninjured, and no one is hurt on our side except the two slightly wounded early t --A dispatch from Fort McAllister, dated 3.46, says that one of the iron clads has withdrawn. Two iron-clads and one mortar boat are still playing on the fort.--The fort is uninjured, and no one is hurt on our side except the two slightly wounded early this morning. The garrison is in good spirits. The firing still continues.
From Fort McAllister Savannah, March 4. --The enemy shelled Fort McAllister all last night till near day. This morning a dispatch from the fort, dated 8 A. M., says the enemy have not renewed the attack this morning. Their vessels are still in the river. The fort is in good condition. The columbiad is remounted. No further casualties at the fort. From Fort McAllister Savannah, March 4. --The enemy shelled Fort McAllister all last night till near day. This morning a dispatch from the fort, dated 8 A. M., says the enemy have not renewed the attack this morning. Their vessels are still in the river. The fort is in good condition. The columbiad is remounted. No further casualties at the fort.
The Daily Dispatch: March 6, 1863., [Electronic resource], The recent attack on fort McAllister. (search)
The recent attack on fort McAllister. A dispatch was yesterday received at the War Department, announcing that the enemy's fleet of gunboats which recently attacked Fort McAllister, near Savannah had caused their operations and moved down the river. The injury sustained from the bombardment by the fort was very slight. The recent attack on fort McAllister. A dispatch was yesterday received at the War Department, announcing that the enemy's fleet of gunboats which recently attacked Fort McAllister, near Savannah had caused their operations and moved down the river. The injury sustained from the bombardment by the fort was very slight.
umstances may warrant. That the humbling of Charleston, the taking of Sumter and Moultrie, the restoration of the power of the Government, and the raising of the old flag, are undertakings of magnificent importance, and of doubtful results, there can be no dispute. We may find the work one of such magnitude as to be compelled to abandon it, but that there will be any serious disasters attending the iron clad demonstration is not to be anticipated. The operations of the Montauk at Fort McAllister; and the manner in which she has received sixty shots full in the face, from the most powerful guns in the possession of the rebels, has set led the point as to their invulnerability. They may not be able to pass the obstructions, they may be compelled to abandon the attempt to reduce Sumter and Moultrie, but that any of them will be captured, sunk, or disabled by the enemy's guns or gunboats, is not at all to be anticipated. At the last accounts from Charleston the number of guns
t that port will probably be fifty millions. Duties are, to a considerable extent, paid in gold — During the first week the total receipts were about $490,000, of which $09,000 was in gold. One million in gold is said to be on the way to the New York Sub-Treasury from San Francisco. The following are extracts from the Washington Chronicle, of the 5th, under the head of "Capture of Fort McAllister Confirmed." The Chronicle says: A dispatch from Beaufort, S. C., Feb. 27, says Fort McAllister was captured yesterday, with a mile and a half of rifle pits by the 47th New York, with the aid of boats, and a loss of 150!! In New York Match 4 gold from 163 fell to 167 A grand mass meeting of foreigners was held in New York to protest against the threatened intervention of foreign powers. Speeches were made in English, German and French. Another flatboat has run past the batteries at Vicksburg, and was struck three times. A fire at Lake Providence, on Monday, d
at and sustained revolutionary movement in Poland, and that Napoleon will find scope for his energies quite near at home. This will leave us to deal with our troubles without any undue meddling, as we shall now hear no more of Napoleon's mediation, save in a pacific manner." The Washington Republican, of the 5th inst, is received. The following is a summary of the news: The Springfield Republican, of the 3d, has a dispatch from Beaufort, S. C., February 22d, stating that Fort. McAllister was captured the day previous, with a mile and a half of the rifle-pits, by the 47th New York regiment, with the aid of boats! Advices from San Francisco, 3d, says that 2,200 troops embarked at Mazatlan for the Southern part of the Republic to operate against the French invaders. Another steamer was following with more troops. The precise destination of the expedition is unknown. The Republican has telegraphic dispatches, which it says are obtained from rebel sources, of glorio
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