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anners.--The women actually frighten them into good behavior. The Messrs. Greene of Falmouth have been released. I hear nothing of other political prisoners. I wrote you that the Yankee papers reported loudly, in large capitals, that Fort McAllister and 150 yards of rifle pits had been captured by one New York regiment, and in the next column whispered in italics that "Fort McAllister was still in possession of the rebels" The Chronicle had a long leader describing the coronation oFort McAllister and 150 yards of rifle pits had been captured by one New York regiment, and in the next column whispered in italics that "Fort McAllister was still in possession of the rebels" The Chronicle had a long leader describing the coronation of some plots cannibal in Madagascar, reformed by Yankee missionaries. The subject was doubtless suggested by King Lincoln's recent installation as Dictator of Yankeedom. What must be the character of that people to whom a monkey is a God?
uralization laws. Printed. Mr. Mitchell reported a bill for the benefit of certain claimants for postal service; which was read the requisite number of times and passed. Mr. Davis reported a bill for the relief of Mrs. Laura Harper, wife of Col. B. W. Harper, commanding 1st regiment of Arkansas cavalry. A message was received from the President transmitting reports of engagements with the Abolition forces as follows: 1st. Report of the attack by the enemy's fleet on Fort McAllister, February 1, 1863. 2d. Report of the engagements at Fayette O. H, Cotton Hill Gauley, Charleston, and pursuit of the enemy to the Ohio. 3d Report of the operations of Brigadier Gen. Re brigade at Seven Pines. 4th. Report of the capture of the gunboat I. P. Smith on Stono river. Referred to the Committee on Military Affairs. The senate took up and passed the bill entitled an act relative to the bonds of Quartermasters and Commissaries of the Confederate States. Mr. Clay o
The assault on Fort McAllister--iron-clads and Forts. Fort McAllister has been made the object of seven attacks from the Federal fleet. That the reader may better understand the position of affairs, we would state that Fort McAllister is situFort McAllister has been made the object of seven attacks from the Federal fleet. That the reader may better understand the position of affairs, we would state that Fort McAllister is situated on the right bank of the Ogeechee, and occupies the farthest point of mainland jutting out into the march. The river flows straight from a point about a mile above the fort to a distance of about a mile and a half below, where it makes a bend Fort McAllister is situated on the right bank of the Ogeechee, and occupies the farthest point of mainland jutting out into the march. The river flows straight from a point about a mile above the fort to a distance of about a mile and a half below, where it makes a bend and runs almost south and behind a point of wood, thence onward to Oshawa Sound and the ocean. During the afternoon of Monday three iron Monitors — the Montauk, the second supposed, from the descriptions in the New York papers, to be the Passaic, a inches in length, screaming along their destructive way like to many fiery demons, plunging into the earthwork's of Fort McAllister to the depth of eight or ten feet, or exploding with a voice of thunder and the jar of an earthquake, for more than
ce retreated towards Shelbyville on the night of the 11th and the means of crossing Luck river are destroyed. This postpones the expected engagement. At Fort McAllister the Montank was struck with solid shot 70 times, and was lifted clear out of the water at the bow by the explosion of a torpedo, but not injured. The action iles east of Paris Ky. A forage train was attacked by fifty guerillas who were beaten off by the teamsters and the guard. Reinforcements have been sent. Fort McAllister. --The Herald publishes a "correspondence" of about ten about the bombardment of Fort McAllister, &c. It says its capture was not the object of the expedFort McAllister, &c. It says its capture was not the object of the expedition. The Fort is of "no consequence." The object was to last the strength and capacity of the and to train the gunners. Success is due as much to Commander Worden as to the qualities of the Monitors. "The time is not far distant when our iron-clads will give such a report of themselves as will be heard at the ends of the eart
The iron-clads. The previous and unsuccessful attack of the iron-clads upon Fort McAllister, and interesting account of which appeared in this paper a few days ago, plainly shows that these monsters are not as invincible as the Yankees have boasted. If they came off second best in an assault upon Fort McAllister, what is likely to be their success in an attack upon Charleston? We have always regarded the Yankee gunboats as humbugs; great cry and little wool. Richmond and Vicksburg have as the Yankees have boasted. If they came off second best in an assault upon Fort McAllister, what is likely to be their success in an attack upon Charleston? We have always regarded the Yankee gunboats as humbugs; great cry and little wool. Richmond and Vicksburg have the honor of exploding the chimeras of gunboat invincibility, and we hope that Charleston will give a concluding lesson, such as will humble Yankee conceit upon the waters as thoroughly as it has been lowered upon the land.
The Daily Dispatch: March 19, 1863., [Electronic resource], Crops — impressments — Military Affairs in the Valley — the severe winter — Court days. (search)
The gunboats The gunboat defeat at Port Hudson, coming go quickly and crushingly on the heels of that at Fort McAllister, must inspire even the Yankee Doodles with distrust of their favorite warlike invention.--But their disaster at Port Hudson was something worse than an ordinary gunboat defeat. Some of the finest frigates and sloops of-war in the United States Navy stem to have been engaged in the battle, and to have suffered terribly. The Mississippi, which is said to have been burnebe successful. With the advantages of steam iron armor, and heavy armaments, it appeared that the old state of things would be revolutionized. But the success of Com. Dupont at Hilton Head, and the failure of a far more formidable fleet at Fort McAllister as well as other forts, show that we have learnt something from experience, and that land fortifications, if properly constructed and deficiently manned, retain their old superiority over ships. The Yankee Navy has, in fact, lost reputation
The Daily Dispatch: April 6, 1863., [Electronic resource], A Federal naval Officer's opinion of iron-clads. (search)
notwithstanding they possess many defects that are difficult to remedy, are regarded by him as quite successful, so far as their fighting qualities are concerned. As sea going vessels, they are regarded to be so very unsafe that the writer declares that he "would rather go into ten actions than to make a passage at sea in one of them." On the question of their effectiveness in the reduction of fortifications he says: "I would guarantee to hold a sand battery like that at Genesis Point--Fort McAllister--against a dozen of them. Two of them would demolish Fort Sumter, or any square case-mated stone or brick fort in two hours. But sand forts are different things, particularly where the guns are isolated and far apart, and protected by high, thick, earthen, traverses. The shell bury in the sand and throw it about promiscuously; but unless you hit the gun itself no great damage is done beyond occasionally killing a gun's crew, whose place can be supplied if its defenders are in earnest.
ch are mounted the heaviest mortars. With reference to the Keokuk, he states that her turret was not materially injured, and that she sank, not from the effect our fire, but from the concussion of her own guns, which "broke her back." Such is the Munchausen account of the prisoner. The only valuable part of it is that which refers to the concussion of the enemy's heavy guns. Taking the recent confession of a Northern correspondent, who was on the Montauk during the bombardment of Fort McAllister, in connection with the above, the inference is almost conclusive that the Monitors cannot safely withstand the shock of their own guns sufficiently long for a protracted bombardment. The effect on the systems of the men is not less than the effect on the vessels themselves, to that were it probable that the latter may hereafter be constructed in such a manner at to remove one part of the difficulty, ventilation and personal concussion are two obstacles that are insuperable in boats of
" A subsequent telegram from General Hood says that our loss of officers was excessively large in proportion to the loss of men. From Georgia--Fort McAllister taken by Sherman. Official intelligence was received yesterday that the enemy, on Wednesday, carried Fort McAllister by storm. The garrison of the fort cFort McAllister by storm. The garrison of the fort consisted of one hundred and fifty men. Fort McAllister is on the Ogechee, fifteen miles southwest of Savannah, at the point where the river is crossed by the Savannah, Albany and Gulf railroad. It is about six miles from the Ossabaw sound. The capture of this position puts Sherman in communication with the Yankee fleet. WiFort McAllister is on the Ogechee, fifteen miles southwest of Savannah, at the point where the river is crossed by the Savannah, Albany and Gulf railroad. It is about six miles from the Ossabaw sound. The capture of this position puts Sherman in communication with the Yankee fleet. Without attempting any military criticism, we cannot withhold the opinion, that exposing one hundred men to the assault of Sherman's whole army, was a piece of extravagance that our present military resources do not seem to warrant.
vered that position is safe from their attack; for we are glad to be able to state that it is held by a first-rate general and an abundance of troops to hold it against any force the Yankees can muster. Stoneman, if he be indeed, as we think, commander of the raiders, has also discovered that his sudden irruption into Southwestern Virginia was not entirely unexpected by our military authorities, although he did catch the citizens and railroad people asleep. We hope he will find this out to his cost before he gets through with his raid. It has only been a few months since a previous raid of his, begun under quite as auspicious circumstances as this, was brought to a disgraceful conclusion by himself and most of his men being made prisoners. A similar fate may again be in store for him. From Savannah. We have no news from Sherman which was not published yesterday. He has captured Fort McAllister and invested Savannah on the south and west. No fighting has yet occurred.
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