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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 3 1 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 2 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 23 (search)
erty pertaining to his department captured from the enemy, and cause the same to be collected and conveyed to points of security; all the heavy coast-guns will be dismounted and carried to Fort Pulaski. 4. The troops, for the present, will be grouped about the city of Savannah, looking to convenience of camps; General Slocum taking from the Savannah River around to the seven-mile post on the canal, and General Howard thence to the sea; General Kilpatrick will hold King's Bridge until Fort McAllister is dismantled, and the troops withdrawn from the south side of the Ogeechee, when he will take post about Anderson's plantation, on the plank-road, and picket all the roads leading from the north and west. 5. General Howard will keep a small guard at Forts Rosedale, Beaulieu, Wimberley, Thunderbolt, and Bonaventura, and he will cause that shore and Skidaway Island to be examined very closely, with a view to finding many and convenient points for the embarkation of troops and wagons o
ls between the Seventeenth and Forty-ninth. McAllister's guns were distributed along the point; Dich was completed during the night, and two of McAllister's guns and a ten-pound rifled gun of the Firre, supported by Taylor's battery and two of McAllister's guns, (one having been disabled by a shot o hundred and eighty-four rounds to the gun. McAllister's guns did good service. They were three twnth regiment,1346968 Taylor's battery,18 9 McAllister's battery, 2 2   Aggregate,123461103687 th Kentucky, Col. Shackleford. Taylor's and McAllister's batteries. Seventh Illinois cavalry, Cad the fight became of terrific proportions. McAllister's battery took position on an eminence, and st gap broken through the National line that McAllister's battery was stationed, and where for a times above them. Cavender, Taylor, Woods, (of McAllister's battery,) Dresser, and Swartz would occasiobliged to retire; a portion of Swartz's and McAllister's batteries had been lost and gained, and lo[4 more...]<
Third brigade, Col. Raitt commanding, Seventeenth, Twenty-ninth and Forty-ninth Illinois, Lieut.-Cols. Wood, Farrell and Pease, and Forty-third Illinois, Col. Marsh. Besides this fine show of experienced troops, they had Schwartz's, Dresser's, McAllister's and Waterhouse's batteries. As already stated, McClernand was first called into action shortly after the surprise of Sherman's left brigade, (Hildebrand's)--about seven in the morning--by having to move up his left brigade to support Shermre wounded, and carried from the field. Line officers had suffered heavily. The batteries were broken up. Schwartz had lost half his guns and sixteen horses. Dresser had lost several of his rifled pieces, three caissons and eighteen horses. McAllister had lost half his twenty-four-pound howitzers. The soldiers fought bravely to the last — let no man question that — but they were at a fearful disadvantage. Gradually they began falling back, more slowly than had Prentiss's regiments, or pa
t that had been thrown up south of the bluffs overlooking Pittsburgh Landing. The enemy having taken refuge behind Lick Creek upon a lofty range, called Pea Ridge, commanding the approaches across the valley of that stream, felt secure in making sudden and frequent descents upon our advanced pickets. To arrest and punish these annoyances, on the twenty-fifth I ordered Colonel M. K. Lawler, (Eighteenth Illinois,) with six regiments of infantry, three companies of cavalry, and a section of McAllister's battery, to reconnoitre in front and to the left of our position, in the direction of Pea Ridge, to drive in the enemy's picket and outposts, and avoiding an engagement with a superior force, ascertain, if practicable his position, and then fall back upon our camp. Rapidly moving forward in execution of this order, he had approached within a short distance of the enemy's pickets, when, in pursuance of instructions from Major-Gen. Grant, he was ordered to halt and return his column to ca
the destruction of the privateer Nashville, while lying under the guns of Fort McAllister, on the Great Ogeechee, Georgia, by the Montauk, Commander J. L. Worden, whoroughly fitted as a privateer, and presenting a very fine appearance. Fort McAllister was strengthened, the river staked, with a line of torpedoes in front, to steamer Nashville was observed by me in motion, above the battery known as Fort McAllister. A reconnoissance immediately made proved that in moving up the river shelve miles up the river Ogeechee, and took a new position under the guns of Fort McAllister, intending to take advantage of the high spring-tides which were prevailinbustle and confusion. We steam on by Hardee's cut, by the range-target of Fort McAllister, which is one thousand five hundred yards from the Fort, to a point nine hen o'clock we come to anchor with fifteen fathoms of chain from windlass. Fort McAllister is on our left, in the angle of the bend of the river; we are nine hundred
point, Ga. this action is also known as the bombardment of Fort McAllister. Baltimore American account. steamship Ericsson, Ossabwhole fleet in Ossabaw Sound, preparatory to a joint attack on Fort McAllister, located a few miles up the Ogeechee River. He had left the gm Warsaw Sound with the three mortar-schooners, had gone up to Fort McAllister, and the fight was momentarily expected to commence. The entirrowness of the stream, the taking of an earthwork situated as Fort McAllister was an impossibility. Unless the obstructions in the river wetempt of the enemy to carry the position. We would state that Fort McAllister is situated on the right bank of the Ogeechee, and occupies thay, like so many fiery demons, plunging into the earthworks of Fort McAllister to the depth of eight or ten feet, or exploding with a voice oing to invent new plans to overawe and subdue the South. Of Fort McAllister itself, and its builders, we should say a word before closing.
echee by a pontoon-bridge, to reconnoitre Fort McAllister, and to proceed to St. Catherine's Sound,ched down with orders to carry by assault Fort McAllister, a strong inclosed redoubt, manned by two General Hazen reached the vicinity of Fort McAllister about one P. M., deployed his division abching the preparations for the assault on Fort McAllister, we discovered in the distance what seeme our colors fairly planted upon the walls of McAllister, in company with General Howard, I went in ation to the War Department, I returned to Fort McAllister that night, and before daylight was overtfifteenth, the Admiral carried me back to Fort McAllister, whence I returned to our lines in the re and for special gallantry and success at Fort McAllister, December thirteenth, 1864. Brigadierithful services, for special gallantry at Fort McAllister, December thirteenth, 1864. Colonel R.s campaigns, and for special gallantry at Fort McAllister, December thirteenth, 1864. Colonel B.[10 more...]
within supporting distance, General Corse moved forward toward Savannah. He encountered about six hundred rebel infantry with two pieces of artillery near the Cross-Roads. His advanced brigade quickly dislodged them, capturing one piece of artillery and several prisoners. He followed them up across the Little Ogeechee, and by my direction, took up a strong position about twelve miles from Savannah, sent a detachment which broke the Gulf Railroad. His advance crossed the Little Ogeechee, and halted about eight miles from the city. King's Bridge had been burned by the rebels. All the enemy's force was withdrawn from Osterhaus's front in the morning, except the independent garrison at Fort McAllister, situated on the right bank and near the mouth of the Ogeechee. During the day that section of the pontoon-bridge which had been with General Blair's column, was sent to Dillen's Ferry, near Fort Argyle, and laid across the Ogeechee, thus substantially uniting my two right columns.
ing communication with the fleet. I therefore sent him across the pontoon-bridges, near Fort Argyle, to reconnoitre Fort McAllister and the inlets in that vicinity, and, if practicable, to take the Fort. General Sherman himself subsequently modifih corps, was directed to hold his division in readiness to cross King's Bridge the moment it was completed, and take Fort McAllister. General Kilpatrick made his reconnoissance on the twelfth, drove in the outposts at McAllister, and reported theMcAllister, and reported the Fort defended by a garrison of some two hundred men with several heavy guns, bearing on the land approaches. The morning of the thirteenth, I accompanied General Sherman to Doctor Cheves's Rice-Mill, where we had McAllister full in view. At the es of the division moving upon the work, and of vessels belonging to the fleet. About mid-day the rebel artillery at McAllister opened inland hiring occasionally from three or four different guns, and by our glasses we could observe Hazen's skirmi
December 13. My command crossed the Ogeechee and Canoucher rivers, and marched to attack and capture Fort McAllister. Striking distance had already been reached, a reconnoissance made, and all requisite information gained, when, in accordance with the expressed wish of the General-in-Chief, I abandoned my designs of attack, and, with my command, moved to reconnoitre St. Catharine's Sound, and open up communication with our fleet. This was accomplished before ten o'clock the same day on wnd crossed the Ogeechee and Canoucher rivers, and marched to attack and capture Fort McAllister. Striking distance had already been reached, a reconnoissance made, and all requisite information gained, when, in accordance with the expressed wish of the General-in-Chief, I abandoned my designs of attack, and, with my command, moved to reconnoitre St. Catharine's Sound, and open up communication with our fleet. This was accomplished before ten o'clock the same day on which Fort McAllister fell.
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