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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 570 16 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 328 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 124 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 116 60 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 89 3 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 84 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 80 2 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 74 0 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 66 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid. You can also browse the collection for Resaca (Georgia, United States) or search for Resaca (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 1: Introductory. (search)
ooker, and slanders Stanton. The salient points of the long story are readily found by those who either followed, or made themselves familiar by study with his campaigns. The reader turns naturally for explanations of the surprise and attending disgrace at Shiloh; the ill-judged and fatal assault at Chickasaw Bayou; the protest against the move by which Vicksburg was captured; his failure to carry the point assigned him at the battle of Chattanooga; the escape of Johnston from Dalton and Resaca; the terrible mistake of the assault on Kenesaw; the plunging of his army, marching by the flank, into Hood's line of battle under the supposition that Atlanta was evacuated; the escape of the rebel army from Savannah; the careless and inexcusable periling and narrow escape of his own army at Bentonville; and lastly, the political surrender to Johnston at Raleigh: these are points upon which every reader desires light. But instead of gaining it, he finds that for most, the chief aim of the
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 8: (search)
gn, considered its opening moves at Dalton and Resaca as grave and needless failures. The feeling wrmy, forced to retreat by roads to the east of Resaca, which were known to be very rough and impracturther notice from McPherson that he had found Resaca too strong for a surprise; that in consequenceced his whole force astride the railroad above Resaca, and there have easily withstood the attack ofssed through the gap and were deployed against Resaca, where, now writes General Sherman, the enemy,red defenses at Dalton and was found inside of Resaca with the bulk of his army, holding his divisior from the record history of Buzzard Roost and Resaca. On the 28th of February, 1864, before Geneon's army busy, while McPherson could march to Resaca to destroy the railroad behind him. I heard frore easy, as I believe McPherson has destroyed Resaca, when he is ordered to fall back to the mouth Halleck on the 14th: By the flank movement on Resaca we have forced Johnston to evacuate Dalton, an[19 more...]
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 11: (search)
at first to add only the Fourth Corps (General Stanley), fifteen thousand, and that corps was ordered from Gaylesville to march to Chattanooga and thence to report for orders to General Thomas; but subsequently, on the 30th of October, at Rome, Georgia, learning from General Thomas that the new troops promised by General Grant were coming forward very slowly, I concluded to further reinforce him by General Schofield's corps (Twenty-third), twelve thousand, which corps accordingly marched for Resaca, and there took the cars for Chattanooga. I then knew that General Thomas would have an ample force with which to encounter General Hood any where in the open field, besides garrisons to secure the railroad to his rear, and as far forward as Chattanooga. * * * * On the 1st of November I telegraphed very fully to General Grant [General Sherman does not give this dispatch], and on the 2d of November received (at Rome) this dispatch: City Point, November 1, 1864, 6 P. M. Major-General Sh
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 13: (search)
t is necessary to go back to the estimate General Sherman placed upon the forces of Hood, and those under the control of Thomas, when the object was to procure General Grant's permission to march for the sea without first destroying Hood. From Resaca on November 1st, he telegraphed Grant as follows: As you foresaw, and as Jeff. Davis threatened, the enemy is now in the full tide of execution of his grand plan to destroy my communications and defeat this army. His infantry, about thirty tia, learning from General Thomas that the new troops promised by General Grant were coming forward very slowly, I concluded to further reinforce him by General Schofield's corps (Twenty-third), twelve thousand, which corps accordingly marched for Resaca, and there took the cars for Chattanooga. I then knew that General Thomas would have an ample force with which to encounter General Hood any where in the open field, besides garrisons to secure the railroad to his rear, and as far forward as Cha