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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 104 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 76 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 47 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 22, 1865., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Dalton-Atlanta operations. (search)
el Hill. On the 6th, it approached Tunnel Hill; on the 7th, drove our advanced guard from that place, and placed itself, in the afternoon, near and parallel to Rocky Face, its right some distance below Mill Creek gap. On pages 32, 33, 34, and 35, General Sherman describes the operations of the 8th, 9th, and 10th, except the veryld be held by a smaller body of troops. This operation could have produced no better result than that gained — the abandonment of Dalton by the Southern army. Rocky Face, instead of covering Dalton, completely covered the Federal flank march to Snake Creek gap, and, therefore, was advantageous to him (General Sherman), and not t that plan was the best. The results obtained, compared with those attainable, indicate that it was not. At Dalton, only the southern left flank was covered by Rocky Face, not its front; and an attack in front would have been on ground as favorable to the Federal army as its general could have hoped to find. With odds of near te
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
threatened him in front. Tunnel Hill is a portion of a ridge separated from Rocky Face by a narrow valley, and situated to the west of it. The tunnel on the Chattanope is, for the most part, more gradual. Buzzard Roost Gap is a pass through Rocky Face a little southeast of Tunnel Hill. The railroad and a wagon road lead throug Newton's division on the morning of the 8th of May moved to the north end of Rocky Face, some two miles above Buzzard Roost Gap, where he pushed up a small force at disposed as follows: General Stanley to hold the gap, General Newton to hold Rocky Face and the roads leading around the north end of it, with General Stoneman's cavtself alone, confronted by the entire rebel army. From the signal station on Rocky Face the enemy's movements could be distinctly seen. About 10 a. m. he moved out avalry pursuing the direct route, McCook's cavalry on a road near the base of Rocky Face, and my corps marching by an intermediate road. We skirmished with the enemy
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
, this division leading. After passing Dr. Lee's house the main road leading down the base of Rocky Face was taken. Skirmishers were deployed, and the enemy's skirmishers were soon encountered. We , and Brig. Gen. W. C. Whitaker, with the Second Brigade, was sent to move down the ridge near Rocky Face and attack in flank. This movement at once dislodged the rebels, who seemed to have only cavad hurried their pace. The division was formed in line of battle facing east, having before us Rocky Face, the summit of which we could observe occupied by the enemy in quite strong force. In gettingn the morning of the 8th the division advanced in line of battle to within 400 or 500 yards of Rocky Face. The enemy still held some round hills intrenched at the entrance of Buzzard Roost Gap, from out nine miles south of Dalton, camping in line of battle, facing toward Tilton, our backs to Rocky Face. On the morning of the 14th the division marched toward Tilton, to ascertain if any of the en
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
rward to the railroad and lay in line of battle. May 9, brigade moved forward a short distance; skirmishers briskly engaged during the day. May 10, occupied same position. May 11, this p. m. brigade ordered on a reconnaissance in the gorge at Rocky Face. One hundred and first Ohio, Thirty-first Indiana, and a portion of the Ninetieth Ohio deployed as skirmishers. Eighty-first Indiana, supporting the right of the One hundred and first Ohio, pressed forward and drove the enemy from his detacheio; Captain Ebersole, One hundred and first Ohio, and Captain Harris, Thirtyeighth Illinois, fell in front of Kenesaw; Captain Rains, Ninetieth Ohio, in front of Atlanta, and Lieutenant Hosmer, One hundred and first. Ohio, in the dark gorge at Rocky Face. Brave, gallant, accomplished gentlemen, whose memory their comrades will never cease to revere, and whose virtues their highest aim will be to emulate. I must here bear testimony of the invaluable aid rendered by the pioneer detachments o
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
ion having the advance; it meeting with opposition near Tunnel Hill, my brigade was detailed to act on the left next to Rocky Face. The Twenty-first Kentucky was deployed as skirmishers, supported by the brigade, formed in two lines. We drove the eh were of good strength, and whence a formidable resistance could have been made. On the 8th took position in front of Rocky Face and remained during the night. On the 9th deployed the Ninety-sixth Illinois and Eighty-fourth Indiana as skirmishers, who boldly advanced up the side of the mountain to the base of the cliff of Rocky Face, where the skirmishers effectively kept the enemy's skirmishers under cover on the top of the ridge. In the evening, by order, the Ninety-sixth Illinois and Eighnergetic, and honorable, he was a most useful and valuable officer. His loss was deeply felt. We remained in front of Rocky Face, engaged in skirmishing every day, until the 12th, when this brigade was moved to the right of the railroad, where it p
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
ving withdrawn his troops from the ridge to make a demonstration with his whole corps in the valley on the east side of Rocky Face, the remainder of my division was pushed to the top of Rocky Face Ridge, forming immediately behind General Harker. Gened by us amounted to about a mile and threequarters. From the ground thus gained the lines of the enemy on the east of Rocky Face could be distinctly seen. Their position was good and well fortified, running off at right angles with the general direction of Rocky Face. General Schofield having driven the enemy's skirmishers into their works in the valley, it was arranged that he should then attack while I attacked the enemy's works on the eastern slope of the ridge and on the top, General Wagght, and the Fourth Corps forming the left flank of the army, Sherman's brigade, of my division, was left on the top of Rocky Face, the other brigades being withdrawn and placed in defensible positions on the flank of the army, General Stoneman's cav
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
ck to camp at the tannery and remained over night. On the morning of Monday, May 9, General Newton directed me to move my command into position on the crest of Rocky Face, on the left of Harker's brigade. The nature of the ground was such as to throw our line on the ridge at right angles with the enemy's works, which were on theted me to swing my left forward, for the purpose of joining the right of General Schofield's corps, which was moving in line down the valley on the east side of Rocky Face, with the view of developing the enemy's works. I found myself unable, however, to join General Schofield's right flank without losing my connection with the l Brigade, under Colonel Sherman, and I withdrew farther north along the ridge. On the evening of the 11th I was directed to take a position on the north end of Rocky Face, where I remained over night. At daylight on the morning of the 12th I was directed to march my brigade into the valley on the west side of the ridge, and took
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 48 (search)
order was received from General Wagner to remain in same position and await orders. Subsequently we were ordered to a retired situation at the top of the ridge, which was occupied during the night. On May 12 this regiment was assigned a position to the east of the ridge in a valley, where works were erected and where during the day our skirmishers were lightly engaged with the enemy's cavalry. Early on the morning of the 13th we were ordered to march, and taking the road to the east of Rocky Face moved through the formidable works of the rebels and also passed through Dalton, the enemy having evacuated that place, and their position near it, during the night immediately preceding. Continuing our march southward the rebels were met on the 14th at Resaca, where they were found to be in a fortified position. While the lines were being formed the enemy used his artillery very freely, and at about 3 p. m. of that day Lieutenant-Colonel Lennard was struck with a fragment of shell, whic
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 50 (search)
es and built a strong line of earth-works. The Forty-second Illinois Infantry and Sixty-fifth Ohio Infantry joined the brigade on return from veteran furlough on the 6th instant, and we remained in the same position until the morning of the 7th instant, when we marched for Tunnel Hill, reaching camp near that place about 3 p. m. The brigade numbered to-day 2,325 muskets. On the morning of the 8th we marched at 6 a. m., and halted about one and a half miles out, near the mountain named as Rocky Face. General Harker directed Colonel Opdycke, One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Infantry, to scale the side of the mountain and try and effect a lodgment on the ridge, supposed to be in possession of the enemy. Colonel Opdycke carried the ridge very handsomely, after an hour or two of severe skirmishing, and drove the enemy half a mile along the ridge into his defenses, which were too strong to be carried. The Sixty-fifth Ohio ascended the mountain with the One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 51 (search)
. On the following morning we resumed our march and entered upon a very eventful campaign, known as The Georgia campaign of 1864. When we rejoined the brigade we numbered 20 commissioned officers and 238 enlisted men. On the 8th of May we skirmished a part of the day and participated in the capture of Rocky Face Ridge, and went on picket in the evening, and were not relieved in time the next day to take part in the bloody and unsuccessful assault upon the enemy's fort on Buzzard Roost or Rocky Face, where our brigade lost so many of its brave officers and men. On the 13th we marched to the front with the balance of the brigade, the enemy having left our front during the past night. We found him again strongly posted near Resaca, where we engaged him in the afternoon of the 14th, relieving the Third Kentucky Regiment and holding our ground for one hour, when we were relieved to replenish our ammunition. Our loss in this short engagement was 3 officers severely wounded, 2 of them mor
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