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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 189 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 25 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 8 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 3, 1864., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 45 (search)
aces. Another dispatch from Bragg: Augusta, Nov. 25th, 8 P. M. The enemy has crossed the Oconee; was met this morning, in force, at Buffalo Creek, near Sandersville. His movements from that point will determine whether he designs attacking here or on Savannah. Hon. I. T. Leach from North Carolina, yesterday introducedhe Savannah Railroad and telegraph, this morning, at Brier Creek, twenty-six miles from here. Gen. Wheeler was, yesterday, confronting the enemy's infantry at Sandersville. An officer, who left Macon on the 23d, states that one corps of the enemy was still confronting us there; our force not exceeding 5000, nearly all militia. spatch from Bragg: Augusta, November 28th, 1864.-On the 26th instant, the enemy started a heavy cavalry force in this direction, from his main body near Sandersville; Gen. Wheeler promptly following, leaving a portion of his force to confront Sherman. Kilpatrick reached vicinity of Waynesborough yesterday, where Wheeler ov
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 58: the President's account of the evacuation of Richmond. (search)
individual impressions of him in scenes which are yet unwritten. The sum of such impressions helps to give an idea of one phase of his manysided individuality, both simple and grand, which rounded out the perfect man. I came out of Richmond with him, the chief and confidential clerk of the Executive Office, in charge of the office papers, a member of his military family, composed of his cabinet and staff; and I was close to his person, until he parted with me on May 6, 1865, near Sandersville, Ga., and sent me on, in charge of our wagon train, he leaving everything on wheels to join you. Thus daily and nightly he was under my eyes, which watched over him with affectionate and earnest solicitude. On that retreat (if so leisurely a retirement could be so called), when I saw an organized government disintegrate and fall to pieces little by little, until there was only left a single member of the cabinet, his private secretary, a few members of his staff, a few guides and s
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 80: General Joseph E. Johnston and the Confederate treasure. (search)
of the Confederacy, to be held for the Treasury Department Judge Reagan and myself left Washington, Ga. I found the party, consisting of the President and staff, and a few others, Captain Given Campbell and twelve of his men, near Sandersville, Ga. There the President heard disturbing reports from Mrs. Davis's party, they fearing attempts to steal their horses by stragglers, and decided next morning to take his staff and join her party for a few days. As everything on wheels was to bon Johnston, A. D. C.; Colonel F. R. Lubbock, A. D. C., and Colonel C. E. Thorburn (a naval purchasing agent who was with the party), taking a receipt from each one; but as they were all of the same verbiage, I merely give one, as follows: Sandersville, Ga., May 6, 1865. $1,500. Received of M. H. Clark, Acting Treasurer C. S., fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500) in gold coin, the property of the Confederate States, for transmission abroad, of the safe arrival of which due notice to be given th
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 15: Sherman's March to the sea.--Thomas's campaign in Middle Tennessee.--events in East Tennessee. (search)
ow upon its defenders, but such was not a part of Sherman's plan, and the former was content to cover the roads diverging from that city toward the Oconee River. Howard and Slocum now moved eastward simultaneously, the former from Gordon to Sandersville, destroying the railway to Tennille Station. He was confronted at the Oconee River, when laying a pontoon bridge for the passage of his army, by a force under General Wayne, of Georgia, composed of some of Wheeler's cavalry, a body of militia, and convicts from the Milledgeville penitentiary, already mentioned. Most of the latter, dressed in their prison garb, were captured in a skirmish that ensued, and Howard crossed the river without much difficulty. Slocum also moved to Sandersville from Milledgeville, and had some skirmishing near the former, with the main body of Wheeler's cavalry. At the same time Kilpatrick moved from Gordon to Milledgeville, and thence by Sparta and Gibson to Waynesboroa, on the Augusta and Millen railwa
His army in Northern Georgia concentrated at Atlanta he moves southward fight at Lovejoy's Kilpatrick before Macon Slocum at Milledgeville Howard at Sandersville Kilpatrick at Wavnesboroa fights Wheeler Blair at Millen Hazen at Statesboroa fight at the Ogeechee Blair crosses at Fort Argyle Slocum crosses at Louis was here with Blair; Howard with Osterhaus. Slocum had moved out of Milledgeville simultaneously with Howard's advance from Gordon, and had concentrated at Sandersville, Nov. 26. driving out a small party of Wheeler's cavalry. Thence, the left wing followed the Central railroad, breaking it up to the Ogeechee, which it croement of our trains and guns a matter of difficulty, and taxed the best efforts of our engineers and axmen. At Millen, on the Central railroad, halfway from Sandersville to Savannah, was a great prison-camp, where some thousands of our captured soldiers had long endured unspeakable privations. Sherman was intent on reaching an
d), 17. battles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. McDowell, Va. 14 Pine Knob, Ga. 1 Cedar Mountain, Va. 1 Kenesaw Mountain, Ga. 2 Manassas, Va. 25 Peach Tree Creek, Ga. 16 Chancellorsville, Va. 15 Siege of Atlanta, Ga. 2 Gettysburg, Pa. 35 Averasboro, N. C. 1 Resaca, Ga. 2 Bentonville, N. C. 4 New Hope Church, Ga. 19 Goldsboro, N. C. 1 Present, also, at Cross Keys; Freeman's Ford; Great Run; Waterloo Bridge; Groveton; Wauhatchie; Missionary Ridge; Culp's Farm; Sandersville; Montieth Swamp; Siege of Savannah; March to the Sea; The Carolinas. notes.--The Eighty-second lost the most officers in battle of any Ohio regiment. It was recruited at Kenton in the fall of 1861, leaving the State January 25, 1862, and proceeding to West Virginia, where it was assigned, in March, to Schenck's Brigade. It was engaged, May 8th, at McDowell, Va., with a loss of 6 killed, 50 wounded, and 1 missing. It fought at Manassas in Milroy's Independent Brigade, of Sigel's Corps
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 22 (search)
substantially, for the right wing to follow the Savannah Railroad, by roads on its south; the left wing was to move to Sandersville, by Davisboroa and Louisville, while the cavalry was ordered by a circuit to the north, and to march rapidly for Millerman's army! On the 24th we renewed the march, and I accompanied the Twentieth Corps, which took the direct road to Sandersville, which we reached simultaneously with the Fourteenth Corps, on the 26th. A brigade of rebel cavalry was deployed befoough it by our skirmish-line. I myself saw the rebel cavalry apply fire to stacks of fodder standing in the fields at Sandersville, and gave orders to burn some unoccupied dwellings close by. On entering the town, I told certain citizens (who would cases near Savannah, the people did not destroy food, for they saw clearly that it would be ruin to themselves. At Sandersville I halted the left wing until I heard that the right wing was abreast of us on the railroad. During the evening a negr
gress, as far as Tennille Station, opposite Sandersville, and General Slocum to move to SandersvilleSandersville by two roads. General Kilpatrick was ordered to Milledgeville and thence move rapidly eastward, tod the Twentieth corps from Milledgeville to Sandersville, approaching which place on the twenty-fiftyed us three hours. The next day we entered Sandersville, skirmishing with Wheeler's cavalry, which near Riddleville ; the left abreast on the Sandersville and Savannah road; and the right, consistinboth corps moved from near Milledgeville to Sandersville — the Fourteenth via Black Spring, and the the bridge, preparatory to the advance upon Sandersville. This place was reached on the twenty-sixt the column encamped about seven miles from Sandersville. Some skirmishing was had, and the enemy's cavalry on the flanks. The troops entered Sandersville simultaneously with Fourteenth corps; skirmn, No. 13. Third division covered trains at Sandersville.--Weather : Clear.--Road : Excellent.--Supp[5 more...]
m Creek; and on the twenty-fifth, after some delay, to rebuild the bridges over Buffalo Creek and Swamp, the head of the column encamped about seven miles from Sandersville. Some skirmishing was had, and the enemy's cavalry was driven away by Colonel Robinson's brigade just as we were going into camp. On the following morning, (twenty-sixth,) two regiments of Carman's brigade, Jackson's division, drove away the rebel cavalry, and the corps moved rapidly into Sandersville, entering simultaneously with the Fourteenth corps, upon a road on our left. In the afternoon, the First and Second divisions were moved down to Tennille Station, (No 13,) the Third dins and presses. No large accumulations were found except at Milledgeville, reported one thousand eight hundred bales bonded by order of General Sherman; near Sandersville, where — about one hundred bales were destroyed; at Lee Gordon's plantation, two hundred and eighty bales destroyed by General Geary; and at Tennille Station,
November 26. Order of march; First, Second, and Third divisions; cavalry on the flanks. The troops entered Sandersville simultaneously with Fourteenth corps; skirmishing with enemy's cavalry. After entering town, the First and Second divisions, preceded by the cavalry, went to Tennille Station to destroy the railroad. The Michigan Engineers reported for duty, and accompanied the column to said station, No. 13. Third division covered trains at Sandersville.--Weather : Clear.--Road : Exceland Third divisions; cavalry on the flanks. The troops entered Sandersville simultaneously with Fourteenth corps; skirmishing with enemy's cavalry. After entering town, the First and Second divisions, preceded by the cavalry, went to Tennille Station to destroy the railroad. The Michigan Engineers reported for duty, and accompanied the column to said station, No. 13. Third division covered trains at Sandersville.--Weather : Clear.--Road : Excellent.--Supplies: Plenty.--Distance: Twelve miles.
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