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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
l Hill. May 6-7, 1864.Skirmishes at Tunnel Hill. May 7, 1864.Skirmish at Varnell's Station. Skirmish near Nickajack Gap. May 8-11, 1864.Demonstration against Rocky Face Ridge, with combats at Buzzard Roost or Mill Creek Gap, and Dug Gap. May 8-13, 1864.Demonstration against Resaca, with combats at Snake Creek Gap, Sugar Valley, and near Resaca. May 9-13, 1864.Demonstration against Dalton, with combats near Varnell's Station (9th and 12th) and at Dalton (13th). May 13, 1864.Skirmish at Tilton. May 14-15, 1864.Battle of Resaca. May 15, 1864.Skirmish at Armuchee Creek. Skirmish near Rome. May 16, 1864.Skirmish near Calhoun. Action at Rome (or Parker's) Cross-Roads. Skirmish at Floyd's Spring. May 17, 1864.Engagement at Adairsville. Action at Rome. Affair at Madison Station, Ala. May 18, 1864.Skirmish at Pine Log Creek. May 18-19, 1864.Combats near Kingston. Combats near Cassville. May 20, 1864.Skirmish'at Etowah River, near Cartersville. May 23, 1864.Action at Stilesb
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
eing made for the retirement of Schofield's troops from the position they then occupied, and directions having been given them to take post on the left, where they properly belonged, as soon as crowded out from the center of my line by the advance of Palmer and Howard. About 11 a. m. General Butterfield's division, of Hooker's corps, supported by Williams' and Geary's, of the same command, attacked and carried a series of hills strongly occupied by the enemy on the eastern road leading from Tilton to Resaca. The rebels were driven for nearly a mile and a half, our forces capturing 4 guns and a number of prisoners. Information was received by daylight on the 16th that Johnston had evacuated Resaca, and directions were immediately given for the whole army to start in pursuit. Our troops occupied the town about 9 a. m. and commenced repairing the bridge over the Oostenaula, which had been partially burned by the enemy; a pontoon bridge was also thrown across above the railroad brid
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
and the left, General Schofield, on the Sugar Valley road. The whole line faced easterly. In obedience to the above order, General Newton, followed by General Wood, marched to the left of General Schofield, and General Stanley moved down the Tilton and Resaca road toward the enemy's extreme right. On reaching General Schofield we found him pushing his command toward the right and front. General Newton formed on his left. General Wood then changed direction so as to move on a Resaca road of General Wood's division came up abreast of Newton's, driving the enemy from his rifle-pits, and secured the position, while General Stanley formed a junction on the extreme left, protecting his left flank by a brigade posted on the left of the Tilton and Resaca road. The movements above described were necessarily slowly executed from the nature of the country, which was exceedingly rough and covered for the most part with thick woods, besides the enemy disputed every inch of progress by his
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
Dalton we moved down the Sugar Valley road. The enemy left but little behind him but his well-built earth-works. A few cavalry opposed our progress. We camped at night about nine miles south of Dalton, camping in line of battle, facing toward Tilton, our backs to Rocky Face. On the morning of the 14th the division marched toward Tilton, to ascertain if any of the enemy remained in that direction. Upon reaching the main Dalton and Resaca road I received orders to move south toward Resaca, tTilton, to ascertain if any of the enemy remained in that direction. Upon reaching the main Dalton and Resaca road I received orders to move south toward Resaca, this division being the only one on that road and forming the left flank of the army. The division advanced to within about two and a half miles of Resaca, driving in the skirmishers of the enemy; but as Wood's division, on our right, had not yet come up, and as firing was heard in rear of our right, the division was halted and directed to barricade. At 2 p. m. Wood advanced and made connection with the right of this division, and we advanced together until stopped by the heavy fire of artille
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
ision, and intrenched. May 13, the enemy having evacuated his position, the brigade, in the division column, marched through Dalton and bivouacked on the road leading to Resaca. May 14, marched on in pursuit of the enemy; soon met his skirmishers; deployed the One hundred and first Ohio and drove his skirmishers back to his line on the hills near Resaca. The brigade was then formed for action, and, with the Fifth Indiana Battery, moved forward on the Resaca road beyond the junction of the Tilton road, and became hotly engaged. Owing to the extent of country to be observed by so small a force, the brigade was necessarily posted in detached positions. The enemy sweeping down on us in overwhelming force and pressing a heavy body entirely past our left flank, compelled the brigade to fall back in confusion. The Fifth Indiana Battery, having been fortunately posted in rear of the lines, checked the enemy's farther advance and punished him severely. Just at night-fall the brigade was
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
him, covering my lines with hastily thrown — up works. The enemy, however, withdrew from our front, after driving in the cavalry, and the night passed quietly, the men sleeping on their arms. On the morning of the 13th it was ascertained that the enemy had evacuated his works at Buzzard Roost Gap and retreated southward in the direction of Resaca. We moved on in pursuit, passing through the town of Dalton and down the valley on the east side of the Chattooga Mountain, going into camp near Tilton. On Saturday, the 14th, we again moved forward and formed a junction about 9 a. m. with General Schofield's corps, which was moving upon the enemy, who was found to be intrenched near Resaca. About midday General Newton put his division into position on the left of the Twenty-third Corps, and my lines advanced to within 500 yards of the enemy's rifle-pits and artillery, the enemy's guns being protected by heavy earth-works, with an open field in front, where the enemy shelled us most f
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 73 (search)
t of the 11th of May the brigade was marched back and occupied the crest of Tunnel Hill. At 1 p. m. of the 12th day of May orders were received to march to the support of the Second Division of this corps, then threatened by a large body of the enemy; arriving there barricades were built and a strong position taken, but beyond demonstrations nothing occurred. The enemy having evacuated Dalton the brigade marched through the town on the 13th day of May, and to a considerable distance toward Tilton. On the 14th day of May the brigade was in rear of the division, the Seventy-ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteers guarding the ammunition train of the corps. During the battle of Resaca the brigade was in reserve of the division and did not become engaged. The Fifty-ninth Regiment Ohio Volunteers was detached to fill an interval between the First and Second Brigades of the division, who were in the front line. On the 16th day of May the brigade marched through Resaca, crossed the river, an
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 96 (search)
iving the enemy's skirmishers into rifle-pits. They were then withdrawn and the brigade remained in its position until 3 a. m. May 11.-Pursuant to orders of General Johnson, being relieved by Third Brigade, it was withdrawn across Mill Creek to a range of hills, where it remained during the day and night. May 12.--Marched from Buzzard Roost to and through Snake Creek Gap, and encamped about one mile east of the gap. May 13.-Moved about one-fourth of a mile on the road leading to Tilton and massed the brigade on right of the road, thence advanced, and, forming line of battle on left of the road, pushed forward as far as crest of the ridge overlooking Swamp Creek. Was relieved from this position by Colonel Wood's brigade, of Butterfield's division, about 9 p. m., and moving to the left, took up position on left of General Ward's brigade, of Butterfield's division, and remained during the night. May 14.-Advanced in line of battle about 8 a. m., skirmishing with the enemy
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
Sent word to General Stoneman, at 11 p. m., that McCook would cover our front and left as far as Tilton and Resaca road, leaving to him the Tilton and Resaca road and the country to the left of it. 11Tilton and Resaca road and the country to the left of it. 11.15, General Stoneman reports the enemy's rear guard quite strong, of all arms, and that if a night march could be made to Tilton this rear guard could be cut off. 12 midnight, received note from Majve directly on enemy's rear guard at sunrise in the morning, marching across Swamp Creek, toward Tilton. 2 a. m., instructed Colonel McCook to nove toward Tilton, covering General Stanley's right. ITilton, covering General Stanley's right. Informed General Stoneman, at 2 a. m., of this contemplated movement, and instructed him to press hard when he heard our guns. At 2.45 instructed Generals Newton and Wood to be ready at sunrise in theent note to General Thomas or Sherman, stating that Stanley was passing down the road just below Tilton, telling about the gap in our line, and saying would push slowly and concentrate as we advanced.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 14: Sherman's campaign in Georgia. (search)
ous leader had moved so rapidly that he avoided the intended blow, excepting a slight one by Garrard, which drove a brigade of Confederate cavalry, and secured two of their guns; and he suddenly appeared before Resaca, and demanded its surrender. Sherman had re-enforced that post with two regiments of the Army of the Tennessee, and Colonel Weaver, the commander, gallantly repulsed a vigorous attack. The assailants then moved on, closely followed by Sherman. They destroyed the railway from Tilton to the tunnel at Buzzard's Roost, and captured the Union garrison at Dalton. On his arrival at Resaca, Oct. 14. Sherman determined to strike Hood in flank, or force him to fight. He was now puzzled by Hood's movements, and knew no better way to force him to develop his designs. General Howard moved to Snake Creek Gap, and skirmished with the Confederates there, for the purpose of holding them while General Stanley, with the Fourth and Fourteenth Corps, should move round to Hood's rear,
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