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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Cleburne and his division at Missionary ridge and Ringgold gap. (search)
ition on Dick's ridge until dark, Cleburne, in obedience to orders, marched to Tunnel Hill, where he arrived about midnight, and where his weary troops had their first regular ration since the 25th. On the next morning he occupied the line of Tunnel Hill, where the division remained on outpost duty until the opening of the campaign in May, 1864. A few days after reaching Tunnel Hill, Cleburne received a flag of truce from General Hooker at Ringgold in regard to exchange of prisoners. Of Tunnel Hill, Cleburne received a flag of truce from General Hooker at Ringgold in regard to exchange of prisoners. Of Cleburne's troops it need only be said that they were worthy of their commander — a man of lofty courage, and pure patriotism, unerring in his military instincts, and quick and resolute in the execution of his plans, which once matured, never miscarried. So uniform was his success, that at length friend and foe alike learned to note the place in the battle of his original blue battle flag, the distinctive mark of Cleburne's division — the only one in the Confederacy allowed to be carried into
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General M. P. Lowry of battle of Taylor's Ridge. (search)
Report of General M. P. Lowry of battle of Taylor's Ridge. Headquarters Lowry's brigade, Tunnel Hill, December 3, 1863. Captain I. A. Buck, A. A. General: Sir,--I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my brigade, on Taylor's Ridge, in the battle of the 27th November, 1863: Early in the morning Major-General Cleburne called on me for my smallest regiment, to be placed on the mountain to the left of the gap, through which the railroad and wagon road passed, leading out from Ringgold in the direction of Tunnel Hill. I sent the Sixteenth Alabama regiment and Captain Palmer, A. A. General, to place them in position. My other three regiments were then placed in the gap. After the skirmishing had commenced between Smith's brigade and the enemy, Major-General Cleburne informed me that the enemy was moving in force to his right and he wished me to go on the ridge to the right and protect his right flank. I moved my brigade at once by the right flan
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 8: (search)
. The gorge was partly commanded from the Union side by Tunnel Hill. About fifteen miles south, Snake Creek Gap, which had ack began on the 7th of May. On that day Thomas carried Tunnel Hill. Of all the operations on the front during the 8th and Culpepper, Va. * * * * The first move will be Thomas, Tunnel Hill; Schofield, Catoosa Springs; and McPherson, Villanow. Nton evidently awaits my initiative. I will first secure Tunnel Hill, then throw McPherson rapidly on his communications, attssible. On the same day, the 8th, he telegraphed from Tunnel Hill, in front of Buzzard Roost, to General Halleck, at Washill tell the story. And on the 9th, at 8 P. M., from Tunnel Hill, to General Halleck as follows: We have been fightin On the 9th, General Thomas, from his headquarters at Tunnel Hill, sent to General Sherman the following statement of Capot defend it so strongly. On the 10th he wrote from Tunnel Hill to General Thomas: I think you are satisfied that your t
r command with which he was invested, it was hoped, would contribute. General Hood moved as was expected upon the enemy's line of communication, and his successes at Big Shanty and Acworth, in capturing those stations and thoroughly destroying the railroad between them, and his partial success at Alatoona, caused Sherman, leaving one corps to garrison Atlanta, to move out with his main body to restore his communications. Hood further succeeded in destroying the railroad from Resaca to Tunnel Hill, capturing the enemy's posts at Tilton, Dalton, and Mill-Creek Gap; not deeming his army in condition to risk a general engagement, he withdrew his forces in a southwesterly direction toward Gadsden, which place he reached October 20th, finding there supplies adequate for the wants of his troops. Sherman had turned back towards Atlanta, and Hood, instead of hanging on his rear, not allowing him to repair the damage to the railroad, and otherwise harassing him in his march as much as pos
he enemy. I expect, nevertheless, to rejoin him in a few days. * * * I remain, Sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard, General. On the same day, October 12th, General Hood demanded the unconditional surrender of Resaca, which was refused; and, not wishing to lose time or sacrifice his men, he passed on, to continue breaking up the railroad. This he did successfully, as appears by the following message: nine miles South of Lafayette, Ga., Oct. 15th, 1864. General G. T. Beauregard: The army struck the communication of the enemy, about a mile above Resaca, on the 12th instant, completely destroying the railroad, including the block-houses from that point to within a short distance of Tunnel Hill, and about four miles of the Cleveland Railroad, capturing Dalton and all intermediate garrisons, with their stores and equipments, and about one thousand prisoners. The main body of Sherman's army seems to be moving towards Dalton. join B. Hood.
portion of the upper arched beam, tend to reduce the tension upon the lower chord. Bridge-building was one of the arts brought to the greatest state of perfection during the late civil war. General McCallum states that the Rappahannock River bridge, 625 feet long and 35 feet high, was rebuilt in nineteen working hours; Potomac Creek bridge, 414 feet long and 82 feet high, in forty working hours; Chattahoochee bridge, 780 feet long and 92 feet high, in four and a half days; that between Tunnel Hill and Resaca, 25 miles of permanent way and 230 feet of bridges, was constructed in seven and a half days; and near Big Shanty 35 1/2 miles of permanent way and 455 feet of bridges, in thirteen days. The following are the dimensions of some of the best known timber bridges:— Widest Arch. Name.River.Place.Curve.Architect.Date. Span.Rise. Ft.Ft. In. ColopusSchuylkillPhiladelphia34020 0SegmentWernwag1813 PiscataquaPiscataquaNew Hampshire25027 4SegmentPalmer1794 BambergRegnitzGerman
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Georgia, 1864 (search)
Catoosa StationINDIANA--8th Cavalry. Feb. 23: Skirmish, Tunnel HillILLINOIS--19th and 88th Infantry. INDIANA--8th Cavalry. MIO 94th Infantry. Loss, 2 wounded. Feb. 23-25: Actions, Tunnel Hill, Buzzard's Roost Gap and Rocky Faced RidgeILLINOIS--16thCKY--3d Cavalry. April 29: Reconn. from Ringgold toward Tunnel HillILLINOIS--92d Mounted Infantry. INDIANA--7th Indpt. BatteOHIO--9th, 35th and 105th Infantry. April 29: Skirmish, Tunnel HillILLINOIS--92d Mounted Infantry. May: Scout to Alpine and8224,44231,687 May 2: Skirmish, Lee's Cross Roads near Tunnel HillILLINOIS--92d Mounted Infantry. INDIANA--3d Cavalry. KENT Varnell Station Road(No Reports.) May 5: Skirmish near Tunnel HillILLINOIS--60th Infantry. May 6-7: Skirmishes, Tunnel HilTunnel HillILLINOIS--Battery "I," 2d Light Arty.; 10th, 16th, 21st, 34th, 38th, 59th, 60th, 74th, 75th, 78th, 80th, 84th, 85th, 86th, 9, 3,000 killed, wounded and missing. June 28: Skirmish, Tunnel HillMICHIGAN--4th Cavalry. June 30: Skirmish, LaFayetteKENTU
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Georgia, 1865 (search)
1865 Feb. 1: Skirmish, McLemore's CoveTENNESSEE--6th Mounted Infantry. Feb. 10: Skirmish, Johnson's CrookNEW YORK--68th Infantry. Feb. 27: Skirmish, Spring PlaceINDIANA--145th Infantry. March 1: Skirmish, Holly Creek(No Reports.) March 3: Skirmish near Tunnel HillINDIANA--145th Infantry (Detachment). March 14: Skirmish near DaltonILLINOIS--147th Infantry (Detachment). March 20: Affair, RinggoldPicket Attack. April 1-4: Exp. from Dalton to Coosawattie River and Spring Place and skirmishesILLINOIS--147th Infantry. TENNESSEE--6th Mounted Infantry (Detachment). April 16: Action, ColumbusIOWA--3d, 4th and 5th Cavalry. MISSOURI--10th Cavalry. OHIO--1st and 7th Cavalry. UNITED STATES--Battery "I" 4th Arty. Union loss, 6 killed, 24 missing. Total 30. April 16: Action, Fort Tyler, West PointINDIANA--2d and 4th Cavalry; 18th Indpt. Battery Light Arty. KENTUCKY--4th and 7th Cavalry. WISCONSIN--1st Cavalry. Union loss (including Columbus), 13 killed, 53 wounded. Total, 66. April 18: Sk
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
, January 16, 1864. Operations about Dandridge January 16-17. Dandridge January 17. Operations about Dandridge January 26-28. Flat and Muddy Creek January 26. Near Fair Garden January 27. Kelly's Ford January 27-28. Moved to Marysville, thence to Knoxville and dismounted, thence moved to Mount Sterling, Ky., February, 1864. Duty at Mount Sterling February 22-April 6. Moved to Camp Nelson, Ky., April 6, thence to Knoxville, Tenn., arriving May 3. Movement to Tunnel Hill, Ga., May 3-5. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 5-September 8. Demonstrations on Dalton May 9-13. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Cartersville May 18. Advance on Dallas May 18-25. Operations on line of Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Lost Mountain June 15-17. Muddy Creek June 17. Noyes' Creek June 19. Cheyney's Farm June 22. Olley's
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
rd, Clinch River, December 5. Bean's Station December 14 Blain's Cross Roads December 16-19. Clinch River December 21. Morristown Road January 16, 1864. Kimbrough's Mills January 16. Operations about Dandridge January 16-17 and January 26-28. Near Fair Garden January 27. March to Knoxville, thence to Cumberland Gap January 29-February 10. March to Mount Sterling, Ky., February 17-26. Duty at Mount Sterling, Paris and Nicholasville, Ky., till May 1. March to Tunnel Hill, Ga., May 1-12. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May to September. Varnell's Station May 7 and 9. Demonstration on Dalton May 9-13. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Cassville May 19. Operations on line of Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Mount Zion Church May 27-28. Stoneman's Hill May 29. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Lost Mountain June 15-17. Allatoona June 23-25 and 30
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