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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
brigade, then commanded by Col. F. T. Sherman, at Cleveland, Tenn., the following day. On the 3d of May, at 12 m., marched toward Dalton, in the course of the day passing through Red Clay, and bivouacking for the night at 6 p. m. near the Georgia line. May 4, marched at 8 a. m., camping at 4 p. m. near Catoosa Springs, where we lay until the 7th, when we marched at 5 a. m. During the day there was constant skirmishing in the advance, and little progress was made. At 1 p. m. camped near Tunnel Hill. May 8, marched at 11 a. m., advancing about two miles and camping near Rocky Face Ridge. May 9, at 2 a. m. regiment moved without arms to foot of the ridge and were occupied until daylight in dragging two pieces of artillery by hand to the crest of the ridge. Returned to camp, got breakfast, and at 7 a. m. moved again to crest of the ridge, where during the day the regiment took part in skirmishing, but without loss. At 8 p. m. moved down to foot of ridge and encamped for the night abo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 44 (search)
iring, however, did not interfere in the least with my skirmishers, who kept up their firing continually during the night. At about 11 o'clock the enemy's artillery fire was renewed, and solid shot and shell thrown into my breast-works and the before-mentioned brick house until about 12 p. m. From that time to daybreak the sharpshooters and advanced skirmishers picked at each other lively, when, at about 5 o'clock in the morning, I saw the head of Wheeler's column move out of town toward Tunnel Hill, and an hour or two afterward heard heavy firing in that direction. Knowing then that re-enforcements had arrived, my men were ordered to charge toward the Spring Place road, and with an uncommon cheering they rushed out of the works and drove the enemy, with a severe loss to him, out of sight. My command consisted of the following troops: 288 Second Missouri Volunteer Infantry, under command of Lieut. Col. A. Beck; 94 convalescents, under command of Major Carroll, Second Missouri Vo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
the brigade was 137 officers and 1,870 men. On Tuesday, the 3d day of May, 1864, my brigade, with the rest of General Newton's division, marched from Cleveland southward on the road leading toward Dalton, Ga. We arrived at Catoosa Springs on the 5th of May, nothing of importance having occurred during the march. The command laid by one day at the Springs. On the morning of Saturday, May 7, we were again put in motion and moved on the road leading by Lee's house, in the direction of Tunnel Hill. We arrived at the tannery, about one and a half miles from the town, in the afternoon and encamped for the night. On the afternoon of Sunday, the 8th, pursuant to orders from General Newton, I moved my command eastward into the valley which surrounded the northern extremity of Rocky Face Ridge, for the purpose of supporting General Harker's brigade, which had driven the enemy from his advanced position and effected a lodgment on the ridge. The evening passed off without any demonstrat
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 48 (search)
Indiana Infantry. headquarters Fifty-Seventh Indiana Infantry, Near Atlanta, Ga., September 15, 1864. Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by this regiment in the recent campaign of May, June, July, August, and September, 1864: On its return from veteran furlough in Indiana the regiment joined the brigade at Catoosa Springs, Ga., on the 4th day of May, in command of Lieutenant-Colonel Lennard, from whence on May 7 it moved with the brigade to Tunnel Hill, which place was then in possession of the enemy, but was evacuated upon the approach of Federal troops. On May 9 we were moved with the other regiments of the brigade to the top of Rocky Face Ridge, a most rough and difficult ascension, lying to the north and west of Dalton, where at the time slight skirmishing was going on with the enemy. Near nightfall of the 9th this brigade was formed in line on the east side of the ridge, this regiment occupying a position in the front line, and w
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 49 (search)
onor to make the following report of the part taken by this regiment in the recent campaign of the army under General Sherman, commencing May 3, 1864, and ending on the 8th instant: On the morning of the 3d of May the regiment, numbering 314 enlisted men, in command of Lieut. Col. W. H. Squires, left Cleveland, Tenn., and marched with the brigade and division in the direction of Dalton, Ga. Arrived near Catoosa Springs on the 4th and bivouacked there until the 7th, when we advanced to Tunnel Hill and again bivouacked until the 9th. Advanced on that day with the brigade to the top of Rocky Face Ridge to the support of General Harker, who after our arrival made a charge upon the enemy's works. During the charge the regiment was under a brisk fire of musketry, but met with a loss of only 2 men wounded. On the 10th commenced moving slowly upon the enemy, and on the 14th and 15th had engagements with him near Resaca. Had 1 man mortally wounded. On the 16th moved forward, and found
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 50 (search)
y, ten miles, and camped. We broke camp at 6 a. in. of the 4th, marched about twelve miles, halted at 3 p. m., and went into camp about dark near Catoosa Springs. On the morning of the 5th instant we adjusted our lines and built a strong line of earth-works. The Forty-second Illinois Infantry and Sixty-fifth Ohio Infantry joined the brigade on return from veteran furlough on the 6th instant, and we remained in the same position until the morning of the 7th instant, when we marched for Tunnel Hill, reaching camp near that place about 3 p. m. The brigade numbered to-day 2,325 muskets. On the morning of the 8th we marched at 6 a. m., and halted about one and a half miles out, near the mountain named as Rocky Face. General Harker directed Colonel Opdycke, One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Infantry, to scale the side of the mountain and try and effect a lodgment on the ridge, supposed to be in possession of the enemy. Colonel Opdycke carried the ridge very handsomely, after an hour
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 55 (search)
. after a march of about fourteen miles. May 4, the march was resumed at 6 a. m. As we were near the enemy the march was slow. Halted at about seven miles from Tunnel Hill and commenced throwing up works, but after dusk we changed positions and occupied a ridge that led down to Catoosa Springs. May 5 was spent in throwing up defensive works along the crest of the ridge. May 6, we received orders to be ready to move at any time. 7th, marched at 5.30 a. m., and at 2 p. m. arrived at Tunnel Hill. 8th, at daylight I reported to brigade headquarters, when General Harker showed me a map of the surrounding country, gave me a guide, and desired me to effect a lodgade. At 11.30 a. m. I relieved him, the Sixty-fifth Ohio having reported to me. A signal station was soon established, which communicated with headquarters at Tunnel Hill. From this position we had a plain view of the enemy's works and batteries, and could see Dalton. The importance of it as a point of observation was apparent.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
the East Tennessee railroad, and marched southward toward Catoosa Springs. On the 4th of May the divisions of the Fourth Corps were concentrated at the Springs. As the troops approached the Springs a light party of hostile cavalry was encountered, but it fled immediately before the onward movement. May the 5th and 6th the division,with the other divisions, remained in camp. May the 7th the onward movement was resumed, the First Division of the corps leading. A few hours' march led to Tunnel Hill. This is a strong position, and it had been supposed the enemy might attempt a serious opposition to our farther progress; but it was found to be occupied only by cavalry, which was quickly driven off by the light troops of the First Division. The hill was soon occupied by the First and Third Divisions, the former on the right, the latter on the left. During the evening of the 7th an order was received directing the First and Third Divisions, of the Fourth Corps, to make a demonstratio
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 58 (search)
twenty-eight miles south of Atlanta, Ga., on the evening of the 4th instant, embracing a period of 123 days, and resulting in the constant defeat and pressing back of the rebel army-first under General J. E. Johnston, then General Hood--from Tunnel Hill, a distance of 150 miles, and the occupation of Atlanta, with the intervening country, by the U. S. forces: This brigade at 12 m. on the 3d day of May moved with the division, on a road leading through Catoosa Springs, to Tunnel Hill, whicTunnel Hill, which point was reached about 12 m. of May 6, where the enemy was met in force, occupying a strong position on and about Rocky Face Ridge. On the morning of May 7 the brigade was put in position about 300 yards to the left of the railroad and formed in two lines, with the Fifteenth Wisconsin Infantry deployed as skirmishers. The brigade was then moved forward down the hill across an open field and into the woods close to the foot of the ridge, the skirmishers meeting with stubborn resistance, bu
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 60 (search)
line of operations of more than 160 miles in length directly in the heart of the enemy's country. In obedience to orders from superior authority, the Eighty-ninth Regiment Illinois Infantry Volunteers, under the command of Col. Charles T. Hotchkiss, marched from McDonald's Station, on the East Tennessee railroad, in company with brigade, division, and corps, on Tuesday, May 3, 1864, at 12 m. Arrived at Catoosa Springs and encamped for the night. Marched again on May 7, and arrived at Tunnel Hill May 8; encamped for the night. May 9, moved forward to near RockLy Face Ridge, and took position in support of the Thirty-Second Indiana Infantry; same day the Eightyninth relieved the Thirty-fifth Illinois Infantry as skirmishers, and drove the enemy's skirmishers up the hill called Rocky Face Ridge. In this affair the Eighty-ninth Illinois lost 2 killed and 15 wounded. (For names, rank, and character of wounds, see schedule, marked A, Omitted. It shows an aggregate during the campaig
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