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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 8 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 2 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 1 1 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 48 (search)
d to speak in Richmond to-morrow; but I believe he starts for Georgia to-day. He may publish a letter. He had a long interview with Judge Campbell--with locked doors. Twelve M. The sun is melting the snow rapidly. The Legislature of Virginia has passed resolutions in favor of the restoration of Gen. J. E. Johnston to a command. What will the President do, after saying he should never have another command? Intelligence was received to-day of the sudden death of Brig.- Gen. Winder, in Georgia; from apoplexy, it is supposed. He was in command of the prisons, with his staff of Plug Uglies around him, and Cashmeyer, their sutler. headquarters army of Northern Virginia, February 6th, 1865. General S. Cooper. The enemy moved in strong force yesterday to Hatcher's Run. Part of his infantry, with Gregg's cavalry, crossed and proceeded on the Vaughan Road — the infantry to Cattail Creek, the cavalry to Dinwiddie Court House, when its advance encountered a portion of our caval
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
wentieth Army Corps. July 27-31, 1864.McCook's raid on the Atlanta and West Point and Macon and Western Railroads, with skirmishes near Campbellton (28th), near Lovejoy's Station (29th), at Clear Creek (30th), and action near Newnan (30th). Garrard's raid to South River, with skirmishes at Snapfinger Creek (27th), Flat Rock Bridge and Lithonia (28th). July 27-Aug. 6, 1864.Stoneman's raid to Macon, with combats at Macon and Clinton (July 30), Hillsborough (July 30-31), Mulberry Creek and Jug Tavern (August 3). July 30, 1864.Maj. Gen. Henry W. Slocum, U. S. Army, assigned to the command of the Twentieth Army Corps. Aug. 7, 1864.Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. John M. Palmer in temporary command of the Fourteenth Army Corps. Aug. 9, 1864.Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, assigned to the command of the Fourteenth Army Corps. Aug. 10-Sept. 9, 1864.Wheeler's raid to North Georgia and East Tennessee, with combats at Dalton (August 14-15) and o
nurses and hospital attendants. So many were they and such valuable services did they render, that it is almost an injustice to mention the few and omit the names of hundreds. Miss Emily Mason, niece of James M. Mason, Confederate commissioner to England, was the matron of one of the divisions of the Winder Hospital, while Miss Mary L. Pettigrew, sister of General Pettigrew, served in the same capacity, first at Raleigh, and then at Chimborazo. Mrs. Archibald Cary did effective service at Winder, where she was assisted by her daughter, later Mrs. Burton N. Harrison. The daughters of General Lee, Mrs. G. W. Randolph, and many others were frequent visitors to the Richmond hospitals, where they read to the convalescents, wrote letters for them, and fed them. Mrs. Felicia Grundy Porter, of Nashville, gave freely of her time and means; Mrs. Gilmer, of Pulaski, Tennessee, served as nurse and matron at various hospitals; Mrs. Ella Newsom, a wealthy young widow, left her home in Arkansa
nurses and hospital attendants. So many were they and such valuable services did they render, that it is almost an injustice to mention the few and omit the names of hundreds. Miss Emily Mason, niece of James M. Mason, Confederate commissioner to England, was the matron of one of the divisions of the Winder Hospital, while Miss Mary L. Pettigrew, sister of General Pettigrew, served in the same capacity, first at Raleigh, and then at Chimborazo. Mrs. Archibald Cary did effective service at Winder, where she was assisted by her daughter, later Mrs. Burton N. Harrison. The daughters of General Lee, Mrs. G. W. Randolph, and many others were frequent visitors to the Richmond hospitals, where they read to the convalescents, wrote letters for them, and fed them. Mrs. Felicia Grundy Porter, of Nashville, gave freely of her time and means; Mrs. Gilmer, of Pulaski, Tennessee, served as nurse and matron at various hospitals; Mrs. Ella Newsom, a wealthy young widow, left her home in Arkansa
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Georgia, 1864 (search)
hurch.ILLINOIS--14th Cavalry. INDIANA--5th and 6th Cavalry; 24th Indpt. Battery Light Arty. KENTUCKY--1st and 11th Cavalry. MICHIGAN--8th Cavalry. OHIO--7th Cavalry (Co. "D"); McLaughlin's Squadron Cavalry. Union loss, 600 killed, wounded and missing. July 31: Action, Chattahoochee RiverTENNESSEE--4th Cavalry. Aug. 3: Action, Sunshine ChurchILLINOIS--14th Cavalry. MICHIGAN--8th Cavalry. OHIO--McLaughlin's Squadron Cavalry. Aug. 3: Action, FrogtownOHIO--10th Cavalry. Aug. 3: Engagement, Jug TavernILLINOIS--14th Cavalry. INDIANA--6th Cavalry. MICHIGAN--8th Cavalry. OHIO--McLaughlin's Squadron Cavalry. Aug. 3: Engagement, Mulbetry CreekILLINOIS--14th Cavalry. INDIANA--6th Cavalry. MICHIGAN--8th Cavalry. OHIO--McLaughlin's Squadron Cavalry. Aug. 5-7: Combat, Utoy CreekILLINOIS--Battery "C" 1st Light Arty.; Battery "I" 2d Light Arty.; 10th, 16th, 34th, 60th, 65th, 78th, 85th, 86th, 104th, 107th, 112th and 125th Infantry. INDIANA--7th, 11th, 15th, 19th, 22d and 23d Indpt. Batteries Lig
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
land January 28. Expedition against Thompson's Legion of Whites and Cherokee Indians in North Carolina and action at Deep Creek, N. C., February 2. Flat Creek February 20. Duty in District of Kentucky till June. Action at Cittico May 27. Moved to join Stoneman June 13-19. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign June 28-September 8. Sweetwater Bridge July 3. Raid to Macon July 27-August 6. Macon and Clinton July 30. Hillsboro, Sunshine Church, July 30-31. Sunshine Church and Jug Tavern and Mulberry Creek August 3. Mostly captured. Duty at Marietta, Ga., August. Occupation of Atlanta September 2. Moved to Louisville, Ky., September 15, and duty there refitting till November. Actions at Hardison's Mills October 24. Henryville November 23. Mount Pleasant November 23. Columbia, Duck River, November 24-27. Crossing of Duck River November 28. Franklin November 30. Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee River Dec
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
0. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Lost Mountain June 11-17. Cheyney's Farm June 27. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Nickajack Creek July 2-5. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Sandtown July 6-7. Campbellton July 12-14. Turner's Ferry July 16 and 22. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Sweetwater July 23. Stoneman's Raid to Macon July 27-August 6. Macon and Clinton July 30. Hillsborough Sunshine Church July 30-31. Jug Tavern, Mulberry Creek, August 3. Moved to Nashville, Tenn., August 28. Pursuit of Wheeler September 24-October 18. Pulaski, Tenn., September 26-27. Waterloo, Ala., October 3. Moved to Dalton, Ga., November 1, and return to Nashville, Tenn., November 26. Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Duty at Nashville till April 1, 1865. At Pulaski, Tenn., and in Middle Tennessee till September. Non-Veterans mustered out June 17, 1865. Regiment mustered out September 15, 1865.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Michigan Volunteers. (search)
-28. Spring Place June 25. Atlanta Campaign June 28-September 8. Kenesaw Mountain July 1. Sweetwater July 3. Chattahoochie River July 6-17. Dark Corners July 7. Campbellton July 18. Stoneman's Raid on Macon July 27-August 6. Clinton and Macon July 30. Hillsborough, Sunshine Church, July 30-31. Eatonton August 1. Regiment refused to surrender with Gen. Stoneman, and cut their way through the rebel lines, but were afterwards surprised at Mulberry Creek and Jug Tavern August 3, and mostly captured. Picket duty at Turner's Ferry and Marietta till September 14. Moved to Nicholasville, Ky., September 14-21, and duty there till October 19. March to Nashville, Tenn., October 19-26; thence moved to Pulaski, Tenn. Scout to Lawrenceburg November 6, and to Waynesboro November 12. Nashville Campaign November-December. Near Eastport November 15. Henrysville November 23. Mount Pleasant November 23. Duck River November 24-27. Columbia For
November 14. Siege of Knoxville, Tenn., November 17-December 5. Moved to Nicholasville, Ky. Duty there and in Kentucky till June. Moved to join Stoneman June 13-19. Join Sherman's Army near Big Shanty, Ga., June 26. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign June 26-September 8. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. On line of the Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Stoneman's Raid to Macon July 27-August 6. Macon and Clinton July 30. Hillsborough July 30-31. Sunshine Church August 3. Jug Tavern, and Mulberry Creek August 3. Siege of Atlanta August 11-September 3. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Bear Creek Station November 16. Walnut Creek and East Macon November 20. Waynesboro November 27-28. Buckhead Creek, or Reynolds' Plantation, November 28. Rocky Creek Church December 2. Waynesboro December 4. Ebenezer Creek December 8. Siege of Savannah December 10-21. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Aiken and Blackville, S. C.
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
rough, Mo. 47, 1; 135-A; 152, C2; 161, D14 Jonesborough, Tenn. 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 142, C7; 171 Jones' Bridge, Va. 16, 1; 17, 1; 19, 1; 21, 9; 74, 1; 93, 1; 117, 1; 137, F9, 137, H7, 137, H11 Jones' Cross-Roads, Md. 42, 5 Jones' Ford, Miss. 36, 1 Jones' Landing, Va.: View 125, 11 Jonesville, Va. 95, 3; 118, 1; 135-A; 142, B5; 171 Jordan's Store, Tenn. 30, 2 Jornada del Muerte, N. Mex. 98, 1 Joyner's Ferry, Va. 137, H9 Jug Tavern, Ga. 143, D3 Kabletown, W. Va. 27, 1; 69, 1; 100, 1; 116, 2 Kanawha River, W. Va. 117, 1; 135-A Kansas (State) 119, 1; 160-171 Price's Missouri Expedition, Aug. 29-Dec. 21, 1864 47, 1; 66, 1-66, 4, 66, 8 Kansas City, Mo. 47, 1; 66, 1-66, 3; 119, 1; 135-A; 161, C10; 171 Kansas, Department of (U): Boundaries 164; 165; 169; 170 Kearneysville, W. Va.: Action, Aug. 25, 1864 82, 5 Fort Kearny, Nebr. Ter. 119, 1; 171 Keedysville, Md.
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