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Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 79 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 13, 1864., [Electronic resource] 18 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 11 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. You can also browse the collection for Ottawa, Ill. (Illinois, United States) or search for Ottawa, Ill. (Illinois, United States) in all documents.

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ustly that a d-d hawk-billed Yankee is here besetting me at every turn I take, saying that Robert Kenzie never received the $80 to which he was entitled. In July, 1851, he wrote a facetious message to one of his clients, saying: I have news from Ottawa that we win our case. As the Dutch justice said when he married folks, Now where ish my hundred tollars. The following unpublished letter in possession of C. F. Gunther, Esq., Chicago, Ills., shows how he proposed to fill a vacancy in the off and acted in the law office has been graphically and, I must confess, truthfully told by a gentleman now in New York, who was for several years a student in our office. I beg to quote a few lines from him: My brother met Mr. Lincoln in Ottawa, Ill., John H. Littlefleld, Brooklyn Eagle, October 16, 1887. one day, and said to him: I have a brother whom I would very much like to have enter your office as a student. All right! was his reply; send him down and we will take a look at him.
oid meeting the enthusiastic champion of Abolitionism. Go home at once, I said. Take Bob with you and drive somewhere into the country and stay till this thing is over. Whether my admonition and reasoning moved him or not I do not know, but it only remains to state that under pretence of having business in Tazewell county he drove out of town in his buggy, and did not return till the apostles of Abolitionism had separated and gone to their homes. See Lincoln's Speech, Joint Debate, Ottawa, Ills., Aug. 20, 1858. I have always believed this little arrangement — it would dignify it too much to call it a plan — saved Lincoln. If he had endorsed the resolutions passed at the meeting, or spoken simply in favor of freedom that night, he would have been identified with all the rancor and extremes of Abolitionism. If, on the contrary, he had been invited to join them, and then had refused to take a position as advanced as theirs, he would have lost their support. In either event he wa
applied to the uses and purposes for which it was given. Sincerely yours, A. Campbell. The places and dates were, Ottawa, August 21; Freeport, August 27; Jonesboro, September 15; Charleston, September 18, Galesburg, October 7; Quincy, Octobe 15. I agree to your suggestion, wrote Douglas, that we shall alternately open and close the discussion. I will speak at Ottawa one hour, you can reply, occupying an hour and a half, and I will then follow for half an hour. At Freeport you shall opossed swords here yesterday. The fire flew some, and I am glad to know I am yet alive. --Lincoln to J. O. Cunningham, Ottawa, Ill., August 22, 1858, Ms. It is unnecessary and not in keeping with the purpose of this work to reproduce here the spe unnecessary, I presume, to insert here the seven questions which Douglas propounded to Lincoln at their first meeting at Ottawa, nor the historic four which Lincoln asked at Freeport. It only remains to say that in answering Lincoln at Freeport, D