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erick by the arrest of its clerk and several of the members. During the evening the Union members of the House and Senate met in caucus and resolved that, the action of the Senators present in not assembling having virtually brought the Legislature to an end, they would return to their homes and not attempt again to assemble. This evening a train on the Ohio and Mississippi road, containing a portion of Colonel Torchin's Nineteenth Illinois regiment, while passing over a bridge near Huron, Ind., one hundred and forty-three miles west of Cincinnati, fell through, killing and wounding over one hundred soldiers.-Louisville Courier, September 19. A large concourse of citizens from all parts of the State assembled at Hartford, Conn., today, to listen to Hon. D. S. Dickinson and others. General James T. Pratt presided. All the political parties of the State were represented, and places of business were closed during the meeting. Mr. Dickinson's speech was one of his best effor
ion in handsome style, and her guns, after getting the range, were fired with rapidity, while the Mohican, Colorado, and the large vessels marked on the plan, got to their stations, all firing to cover themselves while anchoring. By the time the last of the large vessels anchored and got their batteries into play, but one or two guns of the enemy were fired, this feu d'enfer driving them all to their bomb-proofs. The small gunboats Kansas, Unadilla, Pequot, Seneca, Pontoosuc, Yantic, and Huron took positions to the northward and eastward of the monitors, and enfilading the works. The Shenandoah, Ticonderoga, Mackinaw, Tacony, and Vanderbilt took effective positions as marked on the chart, and added their fire to that already begun. The Santiago de Cuba, Fort Jackson, Osceola, Chippewa, Sassacus, Rhode Island, Monticello, Quaker City, and Iosco dropped into position according to order, and the battle became general. In one hour and fifteen minutes after the first shot was fi
of the Wabash, and a company of sailors, all under the command of Commander C. R. P. Rodgers, of that vessel, as well as the transports McClellan, Capt. Gray, on board of which was the battalion of marines of Major S. G. Reynolds; the Boston, with the Ninety--seventh Pennsylvania regiment, Col. Guss, and the armed cutter Henrietta, Capt. Bennett. We proceeded at once down the Cumberland Sound. The navigation, however, proved to be quite intricate, and beside, the Pawnee, the Ottawa, and Huron (the latter the only one with a pilot except myself) were alone able to cross the flats at the dividing line between the tides that meet in the Sound from the north and south. With these I continued on, until, at three o'clock, and when only three miles distant from Fort Clinch, all except the Ottawa grounded, and as the tide was falling, there was little hope of getting them off until its change. I determined, therefore, to push on in that vessel, with the three armed launches of the Wa
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cartier, Jacques 1494-1555 (search)
nd lieutenant-general of the new territory, and Cartier captain-general and chief pilot of the royal ships. Five vessels were fitted out, and Cartier, with two of them, sailed from St. Malo in May, 1541. Late in August these reached Stadacona. The people there eagerly pressed to the ships to welcome their monarch, whom Cartier had promised to bring back. They shook their heads incredulously when he told them Donnaconna was dead. To show his good faith, he showed them the pretty little Huron maiden whom he was to return to her friends at Hochelaga. But they grew more sullen every hour, and became positively hostile. After visiting Hochelaga, Cartier returned to Stadacona, and on an island (Orleans) just below, he caused a fort to be built for protection through the ensuing winter, where he waited patiently for the viceroy, but he came not. Towards the end of May the ice moved out of the St. Lawrence, and Cartier departed for France. He ran into the harbor of St. Johns, Newfou
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Indians, (search)
l. NanticokesEastern shores of Chesapeake Bay. Powhatan ConfederacyE. Virginia and Maryland. CoreesE. North Carolina. ShawneesSouth of the Ohio, W. Kentucky, and Tennessee. MiamisS. Michigan, N. Indiana, and N. W. Ohio. IllinoisS. Illinois and Indiana. KickapoosN. and central Illinois. PottawattomiesNorthern Illinois. OttawasMichigan. Sacs and FoxesNorthern Wisconsin. MenomoneesSouthern shore of Lake Superior. Chippewasor OjibwaysSouthern shore of Lake Superior. II. Wyandotte or Huron-Iroquois tribes: Eries (Huron or Wyandotte-Iroquois)Southern shore of Lake Erie. Andastes (Huronor Wyandotte-Iroquois)Head-waters of the Ohio. Wyandottes (Huron or Wyandotte-Iroquois)Territory north of Lakes Erie and Ontario. Senecas (Iroquois proper)Western New York. Cayugas (Iroquois proper)Central New York. Onondagas (Iroquois proper)Central New York. Oneidas (Iroquois proper)Eastern New York. Mohawks (Iroquois proper)Eastern New York. Tuscaroras (Iroquois proper)S. W. Virginia a<
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), MacKINAWinaw, or Michilimackinac (search)
MacKINAWinaw, or Michilimackinac In the bosom of the clear, cold, and damp waters of the strait between Lakes Huron and Michigan—a strait 40 miles in length —stands a limestone rock about 7 miles in circumference, rising in its centre to an altitude of nearly 300 feet, and covered with a rough and generous soil, out of which springs heavy timber. The Indians, impressed by its form, called it Mich-il-imack-i-nac— The Great Turtle. On the opposite shore of the peninsula of Michigan, French Jesuits erected a stronghold and called it Fort Michilimackinac, which name has been abbreviated to Mackinaw. This fort fell into the hands of the British, in their conquest of Canada in 1760, but the Indians there remained hostile to their new masters. You have conquered the French, they said, but you have not conquered us. The most important village of the Chippewas, one of the most powerful tribes of Pontiac's confederacy, was upon the back of Michilimackinac. Early in the summer of 176<
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pottawattomie Indians, (search)
olutionary War, and subsequently, but joined in the treaty at Greenville in 1795. In the War of 1812 they again joined the English, under the influence of Tecumseh (q. v.). Afterwards they made treaties with the United States for the cession of their lands, when a large tract was assigned them in Missouri, and the whole tribe, numbering about 4,000, settled there in 1838. A portion of them are Roman Catholics, and the remainder are pagans. They are divided into the St. Joseph, Wabash, and Huron bands, who are Roman Catholics, and the Prairie band, who are pagans. Missions among the latter have failed, and they have scattered, some of them having gone to Mexico. The experiment of giving a certain amount of land to each individual was undertaken with 1,400 of them in 1867, and was partially successful. In 1899 there were seventy-seven Huron Pottawattomies at the Mackinac agency in Michigan; 560 Prairie band Pottawattomies at the Pottawattomie and Great Nemaha agency in Kansas; and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Michigan, (search)
Michigan, One of the north central States of the United States, consists of two peninsulas; the upper peninsula lies wholly south of Lake Superior and north of Wisconsin, lakes Michigan and Huron, and is 318 miles long, east and west. The lower peninsula extends north between Lake Michigan on the west and Lake Huron and the Detroit River on the east to the Strait of Mackinaw, a distance of 280 miles. Canada lies to the east, Lake Erie touches the southeastern corner, while Ohio and Indiana form the southern boundary. In latitude the whole State is limited by 41° 42′ to 48° 22′ N., and in longitude by 82° 86′ to 90° 30′ W. Area, 58,915 square miles in eighty-three counties. Population in 1890, 2,093,889; 1900, 2,420,982. Capital, Lansing. Claude Dablon and Jacques Marquette establish a permanent mission at Sault Ste. Marie......1668 Two Sulpician priests, with three canoes and seven men, pass through the Detroit River and Lake St. Clair......1670 French under M. de
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), South Dakota, State of (search)
k Hills, by Professor Pearce, of Argo, is practically discovered by Maj. Andrew J. Simmons, of Rapid City......1883 Seat of government removed from Yankton to Bismarck......Sept. 11, 1883 A convention called by some 400 delegates who met at Huron, June 19, convenes at Sioux Falls, Sept. 4, and frames a constitution for the State of Dakota to comprise the southern half of the Territory......Sept. 19, 1883 University of South Dakota at Vermilion opened......1883 Pierre University at Eological bureau, a State inspector of mines, and a State board of pharmaceutical examiners......1890 Pierre selected as the permanent capital of the State.......1890 Farmers' Alliance and Knights of Labor parties meet in State convention at Huron, report in favor of woman suffrage, prohibition, and tariff for revenue only, and unite under the name of the Independent party......June 6, 1890 Dakota soldiers' home, established at Hot Springs, Fall River county, in 1889, is opened......Nov
ion in handsome style, and her guns, after getting the range, were fired with rapidity, while the Mohican, Colorado, and the large vessels marked on the plan, got to their stations, all firing to cover themselves while anchoring. By the time the last of the large vessels anchored and got their batteries into play, but one or two guns of the enemy were fired, this feu d'enfer giving them all to their bomb-proofs. The small gunboats Kansas, Unadilla, Pequot. Seneca, Pontoosuc, Yantic, and Huron took positions to the northward and eastward of the monitors, and enfilading the works. The Shenandoah, Ticonderoga, Mackinaw, Tacony, and Vanderbilt took effective positions as marked on the chart, and added their fire to that already begun. The Santiago de Cuba, Fort Jackson, Osceola, Chippewa, Sassacus, Rhode Island, Monticello, Quaker City, and Iosco dropped into position according to order, and the battle became general. In one hour and fifteen minutes after the first shot was fi
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