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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 272 30 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for La Grange (Indiana, United States) or search for La Grange (Indiana, United States) in all documents.

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n the redan. Much nearer the enemy, they received a large share of his attention, and three of them were slightly wounded. General Hamilton remarked, while speaking of the fight a few days ago, that: The Twenty-fifth Indiana was not only an honor to its commander, but to the State of Indiana, and the whole army; and that had it not been for the victory of Davis's Mills, both Lagrange and Grand Junction would have fallen into the hands of the rebels. And General Grant's father, now at Lagrange, remarked that General Grant said: The fight at Davis's Mills was the most brilliant of the war. Colonel Morgan deserves the highest praise, not only for standing his ground, and successfully defending the position, but also for the skilful manner in which he did it. The determination to resist the triumphant advance of seven thousand men, with so small a force, may well be styled the climax of bravery. But when it is known that Col. Morgan not only determined to hold his ground, but ac