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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 28 0 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Master Anthony Jenkinson, made from the citie of Mosco in Russia , to the citie of Boghar in Bactria , in the yeere 1558: written by himself to the Merchants of London of the Moscovie companie. (search)
le called Nyse Novogrod, situated at the falling of the foresaid river Occa into the worthie river of Volga, distant from the saide Moron 25. leagues, in the latitude of 56. degrees 18. minutes. From ainst the Tartars, inlarging his Empire even to the Caspian sea, having conquered the famous river of Volga, with all the countreis thereabout adjacent. Thus proceeding on our journey the 25. day of Ma, which we left on our left hand. This river falleth out of the countrey of Permia into the river of Volga, and is from Cazan 15. leagues: and the countrey lying betwixt the said Cazan and the said ralleth out of the aforesaide countrey, and runneth through Nagay, and entreth into the saide river of Volga. The 28. day wee came unto a great hill, where was in times past a castle made by the Crimmet selfe except it be under ground. The notable Rivers that fall into it, are first the great River of Volga, called in the Tartar tongue Edell, which springeth out of a lake in a marrish or plaine gro
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A compendious and briefe declaration of the journey of M. Anth. Jenkinson, from the famous citie of London into the land of Persia, passing in this same journey thorow Russia , Moscovia, and Mare Caspium, alias Hircanum, sent and imployed therein by the right worshipfull Societie of the Merchants Adventurers, for discoverie of Lands, Islans, &c. Being begun the foureteenth day of May, Anno 1561, and in the third yere of the reigne of the Queenes Majestie that now is: this present declaration being directed and written to the foresayd Societie. (search)
aine in his Majesties presence in company of an Ambassadour of Persia and others, and receiving a cup of drinke at his Majesties hands, I tooke my leave of his Highnesse, who did not onely give me letters, as aforesayd, but also committed matter of importance and charge unto me, to be done when I should arrive in those countreys whither I intended to go, and having all things in readinesse for the same voyage, I departed from the city of Mosco the 27 day of April 1562, downe by the great river of Volga, in company of the said Ambassadour of Persia, with whom I had great friendship and conference all the way downe the same river unto Astracan, where we arrived all in health the 10 day of June. And as touching the situations of the cities, townes, castles and countreys, aswell of Mahometans as also of Gentils adjoyning to the same, whereby I passed from Mosco unto Astracan, I omit in this breviat to rehearse, for that I heretofore have declared the same most amply unto you in my vo
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The way and distances from Saint Nicholas to the Caspian Sea. (search)
pian Sea, you must goe to Vologhda by water, as by the easiest passage, and that is accomplished, passing day and night, in foureteene dayes and foureteene nights, in boates cut out of a tree: (the boates are called Stroogs) 1100. versts it is. By horse and sleds in 8. dayes you may passe it in Winter. In Summer the way is dangerous by meanes of marishes and bogs, and not safely then to be passed. Then from Vologhda to Yeraslave, 180. versts over land. This Yeraslave standeth upon the river of Volga, 180. versts I say distant from Vologhda. To the Caspian sea are 2700. versts from Yeraslave. So from S. Nicholas to the Caspian sea, are } 3800.80. versts. The journey from S. Nicholas to Yeraslave is accomplished in foureteene dayes by water, and two dayes by land. } 16. dayes. From thence to Astracan men travell by water in 30. dayes and 30. nights. So between S. Nicholas and the Caspian sea, are } 46. dayes journey. There passe downe Volga every Summer, 500. boat
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Ambassage of the right worshipfull Master Thomas Randolfe, Esquire, to the Emperour of Russia, in the yeere 1568, briefly written by himselfe. (search)
) are many Churches, some built of bricke, the rest of wood, many Monks and Nunnes in it: a towne also of great traffike, and many rich merchants there dwelling. From hence we passed by land towards Mosco in poste, being 500 versts great, which are equall with our miles. In their townes we baited or lay, being post townes. The countrey is very faire, plaine & pleasant, well inhabited, corne, pasture, medowes enough, rivers, and woods, faire and goodly. At Yeraslave we passed the river of Volga, more then a mile over. This river taketh his beginning at Beal Ozera, & descendeth into Mare Caspium, portable thorow of very great vessels with flat bottomes, which farre passe any that our countrey useth. To saile by this river into Mare Caspium the English company caused a barke to be built of 27 tunns, which there was never seene before: This barke built, and ready rigged to the sea with her whole furniture cost not the company above one hundreth marks there. To Mosco we c
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The fift voiage into Persia made by M. Thomas Banister, and master Geofrey Ducket, Agents for the Moscovie companie, begun from England in the yeere 1568. and continuing to the yeere 1574. following. Written by P. I. from the mouth of M. Lionel Plumtree. (search)
nd Taffataes, and some in Turkie carpets cut & spoiled by those villanous Pirats, of whom afterwards as many as could be taken by the Persians who entirely loved the English merchants, were put to most cruell torments in all places according to their deserts. But our men being thus spoyled of their goods, and wounded in their bodies, remained about two moneths at Astracan for their better recoverie: & having gotten some reasonable strength, they then provided boates and went up the river of Volga to Cazan, with such goods as they had recovered from the Cassaks. From Cazan they went towards Yeraslave, but in the way the ice intercepted them about the beginning of October, where suddenly in the night they were taken with a cruell and vehement frost, and therewithall the waters so congeled, that their boates were crushed and cut in sunder with the ice, whereby they sustained both a further danger of life and losse of goods: but as much as they could preserve with much adoe, they con
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Further observations concerning the state of Persia, taken in the foresayd fift voyage into those partes, and written by M. Geffrey Ducket, one of the Agents emploied in the same. (search)
or more evill favoured beast can no man see. In the countrey of Shirvan (sometime called Media) if you chance to lie in the fields neere unto any village, as the twilight beginneth, you shall have about you two or three hundred foxes, which make a marveilous wawling or howling: and if you looke not well to your victuals, it shal scape them hardly but they will have part with you. The Caspian sea doeth neither ebbe nor flowe, except sometimes by rages of wind it swelleth up very high: the water is very salt. Howbeit, the quantitie of water that falleth out of the great river of Volga maketh the water fresh at the least twentie leagues into the sea. The Caspian sea is marveilous full of fish, but no kind of monstrous fish, as farre as I could understand, yet hath it sundry sortes of fishes which are not in these parts of the world. The mutton there is good, and the sheepe great, haying very great rumpes with much fat upon them. Rice and mutton is their chiefe victuall.
or more evill favoured beast can no man see. In the countrey of Shirvan (sometime called Media) if you chance to lie in the fields neere unto any village, as the twilight beginneth, you shall have about you two or three hundred foxes, which make a marveilous wawling or howling: and if you looke not well to your victuals, it shal scape them hardly but they will have part with you. The Caspian sea doeth neither ebbe nor flowe, except sometimes by rages of wind it swelleth up very high: the water is very salt. Howbeit, the quantitie of water that falleth out of the great river of Volga maketh the water fresh at the least twentie leagues into the sea. The Caspian sea is marveilous full of fish, but no kind of monstrous fish, as farre as I could understand, yet hath it sundry sortes of fishes which are not in these parts of the world. The mutton there is good, and the sheepe great, haying very great rumpes with much fat upon them. Rice and mutton is their chiefe victuall.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter of M. Henrie Lane to the worshipfull M. William Sanderson, conteining a briefe discourse of that which passed in the Northeast discovery for the space of three and thirtie yeres. (search)
s of Russia : and the markets, faires, commodities, great townes & rivers, were sent unto by divers servants: the reports were taken by Henry Lane, Agent, and delivered to the companie, 1561. The trade to Rie, and Revel, of old time hath bene long since frequented by our English nation, but this trade to the Narve was hitherto concealed from us by the Danskers and Lubeckers. Anno 1561. the said Master Anthony Jenkinson went Agent into Russia, who the next yeere after, passing all the river of Volga to Astracan, and over the Caspian sea, arrived in Persia, and opened the trade thither. Also betweene the yeeres of 1568. and 1573. sundry voyages after Master Jenkinsons, were made by Thomas Alcock, Arthur Edwards, Master Thomas Bannister, and Master Geffrey Ducket, whose returne (if spoyle neere Volga had not prevented by roving theeves) had altogether salved and recovered the companies (called the olde companies) great losse, charges, and damages: but the saying is true, By uni
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The description of the countrey of Russia, with the bredth, length, and names of the Shires. (search)
vive the silke-wormes (that lie dead all the Winter) by laying them in the warme sunne, and (to hasten their quickening that they may sooner goe to worke) to put them into bags, and so to hang them under their childrens armes. As for the woorme called Chrinisin (as wee call it Chrymson) that maketh coloured silke, it is bred not in Media, but in Assyria. This trade to Derbent and Samachi for rawe silkes, and other commodities of that Countrey, as also into Persia, and Bougharia downe the river of Volga, and through the Caspian sea, is permitted aswell to the English as to the Russe merchants, by the Emperours last grant at my being there. Which he accounteth for a very speciall favour, and might prove indeede very beneficial to our English merchants, if the trade were wel and orderly used. The whole nation of the Tartars are utterly voide of all learning, and without written Law: yet certaine rules they have which they hold by tradition, common to all the Hoords for the practise of
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Of the Tartars, and other borderers to the country of Russia , with whom they have most to doe in warre, and peace. (search)
vive the silke-wormes (that lie dead all the Winter) by laying them in the warme sunne, and (to hasten their quickening that they may sooner goe to worke) to put them into bags, and so to hang them under their childrens armes. As for the woorme called Chrinisin (as wee call it Chrymson) that maketh coloured silke, it is bred not in Media, but in Assyria. This trade to Derbent and Samachi for rawe silkes, and other commodities of that Countrey, as also into Persia, and Bougharia downe the river of Volga, and through the Caspian sea, is permitted aswell to the English as to the Russe merchants, by the Emperours last grant at my being there. Which he accounteth for a very speciall favour, and might prove indeede very beneficial to our English merchants, if the trade were wel and orderly used. The whole nation of the Tartars are utterly voide of all learning, and without written Law: yet certaine rules they have which they hold by tradition, common to all the Hoords for the practise of